Posts Tagged ‘yahoo’

Why the San Francisco Giants Are Baseball’s Marketing MVPs

June 27, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If recent history is any guide, it's the San Francisco Giants' "turn" to win the World Series this year. For the past six years, the team has won the series three times, every other year: in 2010, 2012 and 2014. But the Giants' winning record isn't the only reason fans have embraced them. The team's marketing efforts, including creating unique ballpark experiences and capitalizing on its players' personalities, have played a huge part in building one of the most successful brands in baseball. "The success of a baseball team comes down to two things: selling tickets and selling sponsorships," said Adam Lippard, head of global sports and entertainment consulting at GMR Marketing. "The Giants are among the best at both of those because of the team and the experience they've created at the ballpark." The Giants are MLB's fourth most-valuable team, according to Forbes , after the New York Yankees, Los Angeles Dodgers and Boston Red Sox. The team has sponsorship deals with brands including AT&T, Coca-Cola, Toyota, Anheuser-Busch, Virgin America, Levi's, PlayStation, MillerCoors, Oracle, Yahoo and Salesforce.com. Attendance at the team's AT&T Park rose from 2.8 million in 2009 to 3.3 million in 2015, and season ticket sales grew from 19,016 in 2009 to 31,424 in 2016. The Giants have sold out every home regular season game since September 2010, and TV ratings increased 34 percent from 2009 to 2015

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Super Bowl 50 Breaks Streaming Record for the Big Game but Doesn’t Match Yahoo’s NFL Livestream

February 8, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Super Bowl 50 was the most-streamed Super Bowl game ever, but it didn't break the NFL's own livestreaming record. As it announced this year's Super Bowl audience— 111.9 million, the third highest in Super Bowl history —CBS said its livestream of Sunday's game averaged 1.4 million viewers per minute. That represents a Super Bowl record for livestreaming. The 2015 game averaged 800,000 per minute for NBC. Fox's stream averaged 528,000 viewers in 2014, while CBS had 508,000 in 2013. NBC drew 346,000 viewers for the first livestream of a Super Bowl in 2012. However, the 1.4 million average was less than the audience Yahoo drew in October for the first exclusive livestream of an NFL game, which unlike the Super Bowl was not available on TV. An average of 2.36 million people worldwide—1.64 million of those in the U.S.—streamed the Buffalo Bills-Jacksonville Jaguars game, which took place in London. CBS said 3.96 million unique viewers watched Super Bowl 50 across all devices, including CBSSports.com on PCs and tablets; the CBS Sports app for iPad, Android, Windows 10, Amazon Fire, Apple TV, Chromecast, Roku and Xbox One; and NFL Mobile from Verizon

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In New Thursday Night Football Deal, CBS Will Share Games With NBC

February 1, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After sharing the slate of Thursday night NFL games with the nascent NFL Network for the last two seasons, CBS is now forced to share the lucrative franchise with one of its broadcast rivals: NBC. As the NFL takes over the Bay Area this week for Super Bowl 50, the league has reached a new two-year deal for its Thursday Night Football package, adding NBC to the mix. Under the new deal, CBS gets five early season Thursday night games, with NBC getting five late-season games and the remainder going on NFL Network. The league is also looking to cut an additional streaming package with Yahoo, Google or Apple that would put even more money in its coffers. An announcement on that is expected in the near future. "We are continuing to make Thursday Night Football bigger and better," said Commissioner Roger Goodell." CBS has played an integral role over the last two seasons in helping build Thursdays as a night for NFL football, and we're excited to have them on board again," Goodell said. Goodell said he's "thrilled to add NBC to the Thursday Night Football mix," calling the network "a trusted partner with a proven track record of success broadcasting NFL football in primetime." NBC will continue with its Sunday Night Football package. With 22 million viewers, it's the most popular show on broadcast TV. Thursday Night Football was the 4th-most watched this season averaging 17.7 million for CBS. CBS and NBC will pay the league between $450-$500 million, according to multiple reports . CBS paid an estimated $300 million for its eight-game slate this past season. The deal puts 10 games on broadcast TV, up from eight the past two seasons. But the league needs to maintain a certain amount of games exclusive to NFL Network due to its carriage deals with satellite and cable operators; the NFL Network will maintain exclusivity on eight games next season, and will get production assistance from both CBS and NBC. The deal is a major win for NBC. Once Must-see TV, NBC Thursday's nights have suffered for the past decade.

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Yahoo Shutters Screen, Scales Back Original Series

January 4, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just four days into 2016, Yahoo is making good on a plans announced at the end of 2015. The struggling tech giant has shut down Yahoo Screen, a 5-year-old digital video platform that housed its original series, its first livestream of an NFL game, and old episodes of Saturday Night Live. The remaining video properties on Yahoo Screen will be moved to the company's digital magazines, so like-minded content will exist side by side. "At Yahoo, we're constantly reviewing and iterating on our products as we strive to create the best user experience," said a Yahoo rep. "With that in mind, video content from Yahoo as well as our partners has been transitioned from Yahoo Screen to our Digital Magazine properties so users can discover complementary content in one place." The shutdown of Yahoo Screen, first reported by Variety, comes after a year in which the tech giant attempted to break into original content with the revival of NBC sitcom Community, the NBA-themed series Sin City Saints, and sci-fi comedy Other Space (from Ghostbusters director Paul Feig). It's a blow to the tumultuous tenure of CEO Marissa Mayer, for whom original video had been a priority. Despite the three original series, as well as a licensing deal with Viacom for Comedy Central shows and the entire catalogue of Saturday Night Live, Yahoo simply couldn't compete with streaming giants Netflix, Amazon Prime and even Hulu. Yahoo's originals contributed to a $42 million write down for the company last year. CFO Ken Goldman admitted at the time he "couldn't see a way to make money over time" on pricey original series

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Here’s How the NFL Is Beefing Up Its Digital Presence

September 7, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

National Football League games are the biggest draw in broadcast television, with national telecasts averaging more than 20 million weekly viewers last season for one network—NBC—alone. While the league's digital presence has also been growing (NBC's streamed games averaged a record 3.3 million unique users last season, up 9 percent year over year), the NFL this season plans to livestream more games than ever across multiple platforms, including digital partners CBS Sports and Yahoo, and offer fans a comprehensive paid subscription service featuring premium content. To help make viewing a beefed-up, more seamless experience for fans, the NFL will announce on Tuesday that it has rolled up all its subscription offerings into one package called Domestic NFL Game Pass. The service, which will cost $99 per year, will include NFL Game Rewind, NFL Audio Pass, NFL Preseason Live and the subscription portion of the retooled NFL Now, which features NFL Films and other long-form content. The free, ad-supported version of NFL Now will be added to NFL Mobile and become the basis for much of the video on that platform. NFL Now will no longer be a stand-alone app. The goal is to provide fans with a more user-friendly experience. "A lot of people were confused by what they could get for free," explained Brian Rolapp, NFL's evp of media.

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Joel McHale Explains Why He Has ’30 Good Years Left’ on The Soup

August 17, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Treetop Cat Rescue (yes, that's a real show), the sad demise of hitchBOT, Lenny Kravitz's penis—all topics covered in just a single episode of E!'s The Soup. "As you can see, it's a very high-brow show," deadpans Joel McHale , who has hosted the pop culture-skewering series since 2004. Every week, a team of 14 staffers spends the week with their eyes glued to the tube in search of the most buzzworthy moments. "These poor people have to watch so much television they're going to shoot themselves in the eye," cracks McHale. As with any topical TV program, having an online presence is a must. But since many of the clips The Soup uses are owned by other rightsholders, the show has to do some finagling around which videos can live online after the show airs. "We try to find clips that nobody else found, or we take a clip that everyone is watching and try to tell a joke that nobody has told yet," explains McHale. The Soup has a knack for getting a weekly celebrity guest to join in on the fun. One memorable walk-on had actor Haley Joel Osment showing off his new career in "Haley Joel Osment Is a Cock Merchant," which made light of Peter Dinklage's Game of Thrones character Tyrion Lannister's Season 5 predicament. "We saw that clip from Game of Thrones, and they kept repeating it over and over," says McHale. "We just thought, well, this is ridiculous and, much like 14-year-olds, it will give us an opportunity to say 'cock' over and over again." As McHale works his way through 11 years with The Soup, he is often asked how much longer he'll continue. Given that he also stars in Yahoo's Community (despite recent press reports about its cancelation, the actor tells Adweek the show is still alive ) and is set to guest star on Fox's revival of The X-Files ("People think that I can't do anything dramatic because I do so much in comedy," he bemoans), it's little wonder the question comes up. "I've got a good 30 years left!" jokes McHale.

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How Daily Fantasy Sports Became a Heavyweight in the Advertising World

July 6, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It seems these days sports fans can't catch a game on TV or listen to sports talk radio without being hit with ads for daily fantasy sports (DFS). While fantasy sports have enjoyed a long run, with digital giants ESPN, Yahoo and CBS capturing the attention of sports-crazed gamers, a daily form of drafting players and tracking teams is exploding in popularity. The fantasy sports world boasts 56.8 million active players in the U.S. and Canada, according to the Fantasy Sports Trade Association. Of those, roughly 20 percent are participating exclusively in DFS, up from 8 percent in 2013, with just two providers—6-year-old FanDuel and 3-year-old DraftKings —cornering the market. It's not just fans' ability to build a new team on a daily basis that's the driver. The real key to DFS' success is legalized betting. Thanks to a series of technicalities, DFS players can win cash. One heavy hitter, Tommy Gelati, has won well over $100,000 playing DFS and even has parlayed his success into a hosting gig on SiriusXM's Fantasy Sports radio station. "I play high volume—thousands [of dollars] a day," said Gelati.

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Why Streaming Service Crackle Ditched the NewFronts for the Upfronts

April 9, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Xbox, Kindle Fire, Roku, Smart TV—no matter what device you have, you can find Crackle on it. Each month, 18 million users in the U.S. access the Sony-owned, advertiser-supported streaming network to watch a selection of movies and TV shows, as well as a growing number of original series, including Jerry Seinfeld's Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee. But Crackle still has a bit of an identity crisis as it looks to make a name for itself among the likes of Netflix and Amazon. After an erroneous New York Post report in December indicated that Sony—at the time under siege from hackers and seeking alternative distribution for its controversial comedy The Interview—would be releasing the film for free on Crackle, most people said, "What's Crackle?" (In the end, Crackle landed rights to the film next year in the first ad-supported window.) Crackle's general manager and evp Eric Berger, who's also general manager of digital for Sony Pictures Television, is trying to change that. He's taking big swings like commissioning Joe Dirt 2: Beautiful Loser—the first digital sequel to a movie—and pushing original series like the drama Cleaners, starring David Arquette and Gina Gershon, and the thriller Chosen, starring Chad Michael Murray and Rose McGowan. And in his loudest statement yet, he's moved Crackle out of the NewFronts and into the upfronts for the first time this year: on April 14, it will become the first streaming network to present at the upfronts. On the eve of Crackle's first upfront, Berger talked about his bold move, what really happened with The Interview and meeting the challenge of raising Crackle's profile.

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Yahoo Bets on TV-Style Comedies to Grow Its Video Business

March 18, 2015  |  Variety  |  No Comments

The seeds of Yahoo’s St. Patrick’s Day premiere of season six of “Community” were planted when CEO Marissa Mayer made a critical decision in January 2014 about the future of the Internet media company’s video biz. Mayer, on the job for 18 months after leaving Google, had just fired chief operating officer Henrique de Castro, whose... Read more

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Can Data Help Maker Studios Guarantee a Hit for The Walking Dead’s Robert Kirkman?

March 9, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In a heated exchange before a judge, YouTuber Commander Holly (real name: Holly Conrad) faces off against actress Tina Huang. The issue at hand is one that has divided many a Trekkie: William Riker, yay or nay? Welcome to Nerd Court, where arguments that one might normally witness at a comic book store instead are heard in a "court of law,"

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