Posts Tagged ‘video’

Custom Spots for Honda Help Promote Comedy Central’s Late-Night Comedy Crossover

February 25, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Two of Comedy Central's late-night correspondents, Jordan Klepper and Mike Yard, have found a new use for Honda's 2016 Civic: drag racing, at least until the network's legal department wisely steps in. That's the premise of one of two custom spots for Honda. And it all leads up to Comedy Central's Late Night Showdown, a crossover event that pits members of the network's three late-night series in a Battle of the Network Stars-like event. Klepper, from The Daily Show, and Yard, who appears on The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore, will be joined by @midnight's Ron Funches on a special episode of @midnight Monday night. To help promote the event, Comedy Central got Klepper and Yard to create custom spots for Honda, including the drag-racing stunt, which debuts tonight during The Daily Show.

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To Keep Children Engaged During Prime Time, PBS Will Launch a 24/7 Kids Network

February 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Viewers might have wondered if PBS was rethinking its commitment to children's programming after it allowed HBO to snap up Sesame Street last summer. But today the network announced a big play to keep kids watching its shows around the clock. Later this year, the network will launch a free, 24-hour network for children's programming called PBS Kids. This will let children watch during prime time and other hours when PBS doesn't air kid-centric content. The channel will be available as a digital subchannel on PBS stations nationwide (joining other PBS digital subchannels like Create and World). The network will also stream it online at pbskids.org and via the PBS Kids Video app, which is available on iOS and Android devices, as well as Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, Chromecast, Android TV and Xbox One. The livestream will join the on-demand full episodes and clips that are currently available on the app and online. PBS will continue to air its PBS Kids programming blocks on the primary network during the morning and afternoon. "Parents know that PBS Kids makes a difference in their children's lives, which is why so many have said they would value having access to our content throughout the day. Television continues to be the most widely used platform for children's educational content, especially among low-income families," said Paula Kerger, PBS president and CEO, in a statement.

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Old New Yorker Stories Are Being Turned Them Into Compelling Short Films for Amazon Prime

February 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

How did David Remnick feel when he saw Burkhard Bilger's 2014 story, "The Ride of Their Lives" , about young Texas bull riders, turned into a film? "In a way, it was more emotional," said Remnick, who has served as editor for The New Yorker since 1998. "The film shows kids getting thrown from bulls and getting hurt pretty bad, and their dads are often pretty aggressive with them," said Remnick. This is what happens when the "cool, light tone" of a print piece is turned into a striking short film. Which is exactly the point of the new series The New Yorker Presents, available today on Amazon Prime. Each 30-minute episode consists of a variety of documentaries, scripted narrative films, comedy shorts, poetry, animation, and, yes, those illustrious New Yorker cartoons. The series is executive produced by Oscar and Emmy-winning filmmaker Alex Gibney, and his Jigsaw Productions. Kahane Cooperman, a longtime veteran of The Daily Show, serves as showrunner. After a lunchtime screening, Gibney talked about how his team decided on a "roster" of stories that would make for good films

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Super Bowl 50 Breaks Streaming Record for the Big Game but Doesn’t Match Yahoo’s NFL Livestream

February 8, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Super Bowl 50 was the most-streamed Super Bowl game ever, but it didn't break the NFL's own livestreaming record. As it announced this year's Super Bowl audience— 111.9 million, the third highest in Super Bowl history —CBS said its livestream of Sunday's game averaged 1.4 million viewers per minute. That represents a Super Bowl record for livestreaming. The 2015 game averaged 800,000 per minute for NBC. Fox's stream averaged 528,000 viewers in 2014, while CBS had 508,000 in 2013. NBC drew 346,000 viewers for the first livestream of a Super Bowl in 2012. However, the 1.4 million average was less than the audience Yahoo drew in October for the first exclusive livestream of an NFL game, which unlike the Super Bowl was not available on TV. An average of 2.36 million people worldwide—1.64 million of those in the U.S.—streamed the Buffalo Bills-Jacksonville Jaguars game, which took place in London. CBS said 3.96 million unique viewers watched Super Bowl 50 across all devices, including CBSSports.com on PCs and tablets; the CBS Sports app for iPad, Android, Windows 10, Amazon Fire, Apple TV, Chromecast, Roku and Xbox One; and NFL Mobile from Verizon

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How Super Bowl 50 Could Give a Boost to Verizon’s Go90

February 5, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

While Super Bowl 50 could set another TV viewership record, the audience that matters most to advertisers–adults 18 to 49– has been largely stagnant in recent years. But that may have to do more with where this crucial audience segment is watching the game, than whether they're watching it at all. For the fifth year in a row, the Super Bowl will be streamed over the Internet and on mobile phones, a tally that is not included in Nielsen's TV audience number. And while CBS is hoping most of those digital viewers will watch on CBSsports.com or its apps on connected TV devices and tablets, Verizon could steal some viewers who watch on its nascent mobile-TV service, go90 . Thanks to Verizon's existing deal with the NFL, as the exclusive mobile provider for live games, Super Bowl 50 will be available to go90 customers, with a catch: While go90 is available to non-Verizon users, the NFL mobile content is not. Super Bowl 50 is also available on the NFL's mobile app, but again, only for Verizon's 112 million wireless customers.

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Broadcast TV Is Still Outpacing Netflix’s Top Shows by Millions of Viewers Per Episode

January 21, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Hit streaming shows on Netflix and Amazon may seem to be pulling huge audiences, but they're still lagging far behind TV's top programs, according to data obtained exclusively by Adweek. Multiplatform measurement firm Symphony Advanced Media—whose data was recently used by NBC as evidence the network was staying well ahead of Netflix—has released a new round of viewership stats showing the biggest shows in streaming still don't measure up to broadcast's top series. Symphony's VideoPulse measurement tool looked at the average 18- to 49-year-old audience per episode within the first 35 days of broadcast, and includes DVR, on-demand and streaming data in addition to live viewing. While some of this data was shared by NBCU ratings guru Alan Wurtzel last week , the data released today offers a more complete picture of the 18-49 audience last fall per episode on Netflix, Hulu, Amazon and Crackle's original series. Here's how many people watched each episode of top streaming shows over a 35-day period this past fall, according to Symphony: Marvel's Jessica Jones (Netflix): 4.81 million* Master of None (Netflix): 3.92 million Narcos (Netflix): 3.21 million** The Man in the High Castle (Amazon): 2.12 million* Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp (Netflix): 832,000** Transparent (Amazon): 653,000*** Orange is the New Black (Netflix): 644,000** Hemlock Grove (Netflix): 597,000 Dinotrux (Netflix): 534,000** Casual (Hulu, ongoing series): 491,000 The Hotwives of Las Vegas (Hulu, ongoing series): 336,000 Longmire (Netflix): 139,000 The Art of More (Crackle): 80,000* Bojack Horseman (Netflix): 64,000** Project Mc2 (Netflix): 42,000** * These titles were released later in fall, so the measurement reflects between 31 and 35 days of viewing. ** These titles were released before Sept. 1, when Symphony's measurement began, so the data reflects viewing between Sept. 1 and Oct. 6. *** Measurement only includes 21 days of episode 1 (released Nov. 30), and 10 days for the other nine episodes (released on Dec. 11). Symphony's data shows the continued resilience of Netflix's summer hits like Wet Hot American Summer and Orange is the New Black, which outrated "new" Hulu programming, even though they premiered months earlier. Narcos premiered Aug. 28, just a few days before VideoPulse's measurement began

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From Reducing Ad Loads to Declaring War on Netflix, Here’s How the TV Industry Is Gearing Up for 2016

January 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The broadcast and cable networks, along with streaming services like Netflix, Hulu and Amazon, have spent the past two weeks at the Television Critics Association's winter press tour, sharing their plans for midseason and beyond. (You can find all of Adweek's TCA coverage here .) In addition to trotting out the new shows they hope will connect with audiences, the networks also addressed the industry's larger issues—chiefly, how to stay relevant in a dramatically-shifting landscape—and how to solve them. Here are the five biggest takeaways from the TCA winter press tour, and the most significant ways the industry will change this year: 1. Reducing ad loads to entice and keep viewers. "TV is the best advertising delivery mechanism ever invented. It's unparalleled for building brands and moving consumers, but we have overstuffed the bird" and diluted the effectiveness of ads, said Kevin Reilly, president of TNT and TBS, and chief creative officer of Turner Entertainment. That's why as part of his dramatic overhaul of TNT and TBS, Reilly is going to reduce the ad load on TNT's three new dramas this year by more than half , which will add eight to 10 minutes of program time per hour. (Turner is pursuing a similar strategy for truTV .) Fewer, more effective ads are essential to "create a better viewing experience," Reilly said. And if networks want to keep audiences from flocking to Netflix, reducing their "overstuffed" ad load is a solid first step. 2. The best way to make a series premiere stand out: Drop the ads. Sensing a trend here? Sometimes reducing ads isn't enough: Some networks are eliminating them altogether in order to make a splash of their series premieres. Syfy led the charge with The Magicians debut last month , and at least one other network is following suit. WGN America will premiere its next two series—Outsiders on Jan. 26, and Underground on March 9—without ads. "In today's competitive landscape, we felt it was important for viewers to get as pure and as uninterrupted an introduction to these worlds as possible," said Matt Cherniss, president and GM for WGN America and Tribune Studios. 3. Even more TV is on the way—for at least one more year. A record 412 scripted series aired last year , along with an additional 750 unscripted series.

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Symphony Brushes Off Netflix Attacks on Its Ratings Metrics

January 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If Netflix was hoping to intimidate Symphony Advanced Media into submission when it blasted the company's data —which, for the first time, revealed how many viewers are watching Netflix's original series —it is going to have to switch to Plan B. Symphony Advanced Media told Adweek today it is standing by its metrics, which Netflix's chief content officer Ted Sarandos derided as "remarkably inaccurate data" that "doesn't reflect any sense of reality of anything that we keep track of." Despite Sarandos' scoffing, "we have confidence in our data," said Laura Bernstein, Symphony's svp of client solutions. She said that Symphony's multiplatform measurement tool, VideoPulse, also measures broadcast and cable programming, and the company's partners and clients—which include NBCUniversal, A+E Networks and Viacom—have said Symphony's numbers echo the data they receive from other ratings sources like Nielsen. "There's some variation—there's different methodologies to data collection—but for the most part, we're very in line with other published numbers and with what our clients would expect. So our methodology is where people would want it to be on the broadcast and cable, where there is a comparison, which gives us a lot of confidence in what we're seeing in the streaming originals," said Bernstein. NBC kickstarted Symphony's battle with Netflix last Wednesday, when NBCUniversal's ratings guru Alan Wurtzel shared Symphony's Netflix data with reporters during the Television Critics Association's winter press tour. Wurtzel claimed Netflix doesn't yet pose a "consistent" threat to broadcasters. To make his point, Wurtzel incorporated data from Symphony Advanced Media, which has been tracking Netflix ratings metrics for the notoriously tight-lipped streaming service with VideoPulse, the multiplatform measurement tool Symphony unveiled last September . (Symphony does that by using automatic content recognition, or ACR, software embedded on a mobile app to recognize and match a program's audio files, as well as URL matches for streamed content. The company also sends a targeted survey to its panelists twice a week, asking which platform they watched specific programs on, to determine whether a show like Quantico was viewed via Hulu, VOD, ABC.com or DVR.) Among the Symphony data that Wurtzel shared: Each episode of Marvel's Jessica Jones averaged 4.8 million viewers in the 18-49 demographic within 35 days of its November premiere. Master of None drew 3.9 million in the demo and Narcos was third with 3.2 million. Sarandos returned fire on Sunday, blasting Symphony's methodology and data. "It's a bold statement for them to make," said Bernstein of the company's response. "We've never had a conversation with Netflix, so I'm not even familiar with what they know of our methodology." And while Sarandos argued that the 18-49 demo "means nothing" to Netflix, Symphony counters that the demographic is in fact incredibly important to the industry. "It's the demo that matters to the people who are selling advertising, so I do think that makes it an important demo," she said.

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How Hulu Is Helping Shows Like Dawson’s Creek and Melrose Place Find New Audiences

January 9, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

While most outlets are using their time at Television Critics Association's winter press tour to focus on upcoming shows, Hulu took a different approach to part of its presentation: showing how the streaming service has helped bring new audiences to beloved series of the past. "We've signed a multi-year agreement with Sony, which is going to bring a tremendous lineup of programming, including all episodes of series like The Shield, Party of Five, Dawson's Creek and a vast movie library to Hulu," said svp of content Craig Erwich. Also included in the deal: Damages and Happy Endings . Several TV creators who have shows streaming on Hulu talked about how subscription video on demand (SVOD) services are giving their projects new life—and a new revenue stream. "We're excited about the fact that new audiences are discovering our shows," said Darren Star, creator of '90s hit programs Beverly Hills, 90210 and Melrose Place. As for the financial benefits of appearing on Hulu, Star said he's not making anywhere near the estimated $180 million that Hulu paid to secure SVOD rights to Seinfeld last spring. "There's an income stream, but I read that Seinfeld story , I was like, wait a second, that's a lot of money! I'm not sure that's happening here," said Star.

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Yahoo Shutters Screen, Scales Back Original Series

January 4, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just four days into 2016, Yahoo is making good on a plans announced at the end of 2015. The struggling tech giant has shut down Yahoo Screen, a 5-year-old digital video platform that housed its original series, its first livestream of an NFL game, and old episodes of Saturday Night Live. The remaining video properties on Yahoo Screen will be moved to the company's digital magazines, so like-minded content will exist side by side. "At Yahoo, we're constantly reviewing and iterating on our products as we strive to create the best user experience," said a Yahoo rep. "With that in mind, video content from Yahoo as well as our partners has been transitioned from Yahoo Screen to our Digital Magazine properties so users can discover complementary content in one place." The shutdown of Yahoo Screen, first reported by Variety, comes after a year in which the tech giant attempted to break into original content with the revival of NBC sitcom Community, the NBA-themed series Sin City Saints, and sci-fi comedy Other Space (from Ghostbusters director Paul Feig). It's a blow to the tumultuous tenure of CEO Marissa Mayer, for whom original video had been a priority. Despite the three original series, as well as a licensing deal with Viacom for Comedy Central shows and the entire catalogue of Saturday Night Live, Yahoo simply couldn't compete with streaming giants Netflix, Amazon Prime and even Hulu. Yahoo's originals contributed to a $42 million write down for the company last year. CFO Ken Goldman admitted at the time he "couldn't see a way to make money over time" on pricey original series

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