Posts Tagged ‘video’

State Farm Is Being Featured in Tonight’s Episode of Black-ish

March 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Faced with declining overnight ratings and the myriad ways viewers can avoid ads, some brands are beginning to master the art of product placement, and networks are reaping the rewards. Last season, ABC's hit comedy Modern Family produced an episode shot entirely with Apple products. But that integration—in an episode called "Connection Lost"—was not a paid placement. Tonight, another ABC sitcom incorporates a well-known brand into its storyline, but this time, it gets something in return. On Black-ish, advertising executive Dre Johnson (played by Anthony Anderson) persuades his client, State Farm Insurance, to sponsor his son's basketball team, the "State Farm Good Neighbors." The integration, created in partnership with Omnicom agency The Marketing Arm, fits with State Farm's already sizeable footprint in basketball—it's a brand partner of the NCAA, NBA and WNBA.

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PopSugar Will Now Create Health and Fitness Content for TV

March 3, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

You may not have heard of the TV network Z Living. It's an Indian-owned health and fitness channel that, while available in 169 countries around the world, has yet to make a meaningful dent stateside. You've probably heard of PopSugar, one of the strongest brands among millennial women, with some 44 million monthly uniques according to comScore. Z Living is in need of programming. And that's where PopSugar comes in. The two have inked a wide-ranging production deal. "I think the brands are really well aligned," said Rafe Oller, Z Living's general manager, who approached PopSugar Studios president David Grant when looking for ways to work together. "We've got a certain audience and a high level of engagement," Grant said. PopSugar will create TV versions of their online series, including Class FitSugar. They'lll also develop a prime time series exclusively for Z Living. All of the shows will be branded 'PopSugar on Z Living.' Fitness has become a major growth area for PopSugar which, in January, saw month over month growth of 36 percent, making it the top vertical for the multichannel network.

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YouTube Star PewDiePie Can Now Win a Primetime TV Emmy

March 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

PewDiePie already boasts the largest following on YouTube, and now the popular creator could add another accomplishment to his list: an Emmy award. Today the Television Academy announced it has expanded and redefined many short-form categories for this year's Primetime Emmys. The Academy added three awards: Outstanding Short Form Series, Variety; Outstanding Individual Actor in a Short Form Series; and Outstanding Individual Actress in a Short Form Series. The Academy also renamed the Short Format Live Entertainment category as Outstanding Short Form Series, Comedy or Drama; and Short Format Nonfiction is now Outstanding Short Form Series, Reality/Nonfiction. The Academy defines a short-form series as having a minimum of six episodes that average 15 minutes or less. "Our industry is aggressively, quickly and creatively evolving the various ways episodic stories are told," said TV Academy chairman and CEO Bruce Rosenblum. "These category changes reflect the broader opportunities that emerging networks and distribution platforms, such as Maker Studios, Fullscreen, Crackle, AwesomenessTV, YouTube Red, Adult Swim and others, are seizing in choosing innovative formats that enable our television community to share stories in novel and entertaining ways." While the big streaming players like Netflix, Amazon and Hulu have qualified for TV Emmy nominations—and have won many—other digital players that don't have the budget for 30- or 60-minute episodes have largely been ignored. Until now, if a digital short longed for a prize, it would have to vie for a Webby or Streamy, which are based on fan votes.

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SheKnows Media Joins the Ranks of First-Time Presenters at This Year’s NewFronts

March 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The 2016 Digital Content NewFronts, now just two months away, will feature the largest roster of companies vying for a slice of the $3 billion digital-video advertising pie. Among the 37 presenting companies are six first-timers , including Playboy, Mashable and Hearst. The latest to join that group is SheKnows Media, the parenting, entertainment and lifestyle brand that reaches 90 million unique visitors per month. SheKnows replaces Vevo, the video music hub, which dropped out of the annual digital marketplace. "It felt like the right time for us to join," Samantha Skey, president and CMO for SheKnows Media, told Adweek. "We've spent a lot of time and effort experimenting with video content and what our audience wants from us." While Skey didn't divulge specifics on what SheKnows will present to media buyers, she said the company is focusing on growing its Hatch and The Pitch products.

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Custom Spots for Honda Help Promote Comedy Central’s Late-Night Comedy Crossover

February 25, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Two of Comedy Central's late-night correspondents, Jordan Klepper and Mike Yard, have found a new use for Honda's 2016 Civic: drag racing, at least until the network's legal department wisely steps in. That's the premise of one of two custom spots for Honda. And it all leads up to Comedy Central's Late Night Showdown, a crossover event that pits members of the network's three late-night series in a Battle of the Network Stars-like event. Klepper, from The Daily Show, and Yard, who appears on The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore, will be joined by @midnight's Ron Funches on a special episode of @midnight Monday night. To help promote the event, Comedy Central got Klepper and Yard to create custom spots for Honda, including the drag-racing stunt, which debuts tonight during The Daily Show.

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To Keep Children Engaged During Prime Time, PBS Will Launch a 24/7 Kids Network

February 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Viewers might have wondered if PBS was rethinking its commitment to children's programming after it allowed HBO to snap up Sesame Street last summer. But today the network announced a big play to keep kids watching its shows around the clock. Later this year, the network will launch a free, 24-hour network for children's programming called PBS Kids. This will let children watch during prime time and other hours when PBS doesn't air kid-centric content. The channel will be available as a digital subchannel on PBS stations nationwide (joining other PBS digital subchannels like Create and World). The network will also stream it online at pbskids.org and via the PBS Kids Video app, which is available on iOS and Android devices, as well as Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, Chromecast, Android TV and Xbox One. The livestream will join the on-demand full episodes and clips that are currently available on the app and online. PBS will continue to air its PBS Kids programming blocks on the primary network during the morning and afternoon. "Parents know that PBS Kids makes a difference in their children's lives, which is why so many have said they would value having access to our content throughout the day. Television continues to be the most widely used platform for children's educational content, especially among low-income families," said Paula Kerger, PBS president and CEO, in a statement.

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Old New Yorker Stories Are Being Turned Them Into Compelling Short Films for Amazon Prime

February 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

How did David Remnick feel when he saw Burkhard Bilger's 2014 story, "The Ride of Their Lives" , about young Texas bull riders, turned into a film? "In a way, it was more emotional," said Remnick, who has served as editor for The New Yorker since 1998. "The film shows kids getting thrown from bulls and getting hurt pretty bad, and their dads are often pretty aggressive with them," said Remnick. This is what happens when the "cool, light tone" of a print piece is turned into a striking short film. Which is exactly the point of the new series The New Yorker Presents, available today on Amazon Prime. Each 30-minute episode consists of a variety of documentaries, scripted narrative films, comedy shorts, poetry, animation, and, yes, those illustrious New Yorker cartoons. The series is executive produced by Oscar and Emmy-winning filmmaker Alex Gibney, and his Jigsaw Productions. Kahane Cooperman, a longtime veteran of The Daily Show, serves as showrunner. After a lunchtime screening, Gibney talked about how his team decided on a "roster" of stories that would make for good films

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Super Bowl 50 Breaks Streaming Record for the Big Game but Doesn’t Match Yahoo’s NFL Livestream

February 8, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Super Bowl 50 was the most-streamed Super Bowl game ever, but it didn't break the NFL's own livestreaming record. As it announced this year's Super Bowl audience— 111.9 million, the third highest in Super Bowl history —CBS said its livestream of Sunday's game averaged 1.4 million viewers per minute. That represents a Super Bowl record for livestreaming. The 2015 game averaged 800,000 per minute for NBC. Fox's stream averaged 528,000 viewers in 2014, while CBS had 508,000 in 2013. NBC drew 346,000 viewers for the first livestream of a Super Bowl in 2012. However, the 1.4 million average was less than the audience Yahoo drew in October for the first exclusive livestream of an NFL game, which unlike the Super Bowl was not available on TV. An average of 2.36 million people worldwide—1.64 million of those in the U.S.—streamed the Buffalo Bills-Jacksonville Jaguars game, which took place in London. CBS said 3.96 million unique viewers watched Super Bowl 50 across all devices, including CBSSports.com on PCs and tablets; the CBS Sports app for iPad, Android, Windows 10, Amazon Fire, Apple TV, Chromecast, Roku and Xbox One; and NFL Mobile from Verizon

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How Super Bowl 50 Could Give a Boost to Verizon’s Go90

February 5, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

While Super Bowl 50 could set another TV viewership record, the audience that matters most to advertisers–adults 18 to 49– has been largely stagnant in recent years. But that may have to do more with where this crucial audience segment is watching the game, than whether they're watching it at all. For the fifth year in a row, the Super Bowl will be streamed over the Internet and on mobile phones, a tally that is not included in Nielsen's TV audience number. And while CBS is hoping most of those digital viewers will watch on CBSsports.com or its apps on connected TV devices and tablets, Verizon could steal some viewers who watch on its nascent mobile-TV service, go90 . Thanks to Verizon's existing deal with the NFL, as the exclusive mobile provider for live games, Super Bowl 50 will be available to go90 customers, with a catch: While go90 is available to non-Verizon users, the NFL mobile content is not. Super Bowl 50 is also available on the NFL's mobile app, but again, only for Verizon's 112 million wireless customers.

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Broadcast TV Is Still Outpacing Netflix’s Top Shows by Millions of Viewers Per Episode

January 21, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Hit streaming shows on Netflix and Amazon may seem to be pulling huge audiences, but they're still lagging far behind TV's top programs, according to data obtained exclusively by Adweek. Multiplatform measurement firm Symphony Advanced Media—whose data was recently used by NBC as evidence the network was staying well ahead of Netflix—has released a new round of viewership stats showing the biggest shows in streaming still don't measure up to broadcast's top series. Symphony's VideoPulse measurement tool looked at the average 18- to 49-year-old audience per episode within the first 35 days of broadcast, and includes DVR, on-demand and streaming data in addition to live viewing. While some of this data was shared by NBCU ratings guru Alan Wurtzel last week , the data released today offers a more complete picture of the 18-49 audience last fall per episode on Netflix, Hulu, Amazon and Crackle's original series. Here's how many people watched each episode of top streaming shows over a 35-day period this past fall, according to Symphony: Marvel's Jessica Jones (Netflix): 4.81 million* Master of None (Netflix): 3.92 million Narcos (Netflix): 3.21 million** The Man in the High Castle (Amazon): 2.12 million* Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp (Netflix): 832,000** Transparent (Amazon): 653,000*** Orange is the New Black (Netflix): 644,000** Hemlock Grove (Netflix): 597,000 Dinotrux (Netflix): 534,000** Casual (Hulu, ongoing series): 491,000 The Hotwives of Las Vegas (Hulu, ongoing series): 336,000 Longmire (Netflix): 139,000 The Art of More (Crackle): 80,000* Bojack Horseman (Netflix): 64,000** Project Mc2 (Netflix): 42,000** * These titles were released later in fall, so the measurement reflects between 31 and 35 days of viewing. ** These titles were released before Sept. 1, when Symphony's measurement began, so the data reflects viewing between Sept. 1 and Oct. 6. *** Measurement only includes 21 days of episode 1 (released Nov. 30), and 10 days for the other nine episodes (released on Dec. 11). Symphony's data shows the continued resilience of Netflix's summer hits like Wet Hot American Summer and Orange is the New Black, which outrated "new" Hulu programming, even though they premiered months earlier. Narcos premiered Aug. 28, just a few days before VideoPulse's measurement began

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