Posts Tagged ‘video’

How It Feels to Go Viral, Then Watch Your Content Get Stolen All Over the Internet

April 4, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On a Tuesday morning in December, I uploaded my late-night talk show's 449th video to YouTube, then went about my day. By the afternoon, I was thinking this one—a mockumentary called "Instagram Husband" created for our Springfield, Missouri-based show, The Mystery Hour —might be different. The next day, when it hit 1 million views, I knew it was different. And by the time the next week rolled around, I didn't know which way was up anymore. When I came up with the idea for "Instagram Husband," I had a vague sense it had the chance to go viral, because when I shared the idea with people they enthusiastically related. I thought people I know would share it, the team that helped create it would share it, fans of my show would share it, and it would be a nice little feather in the cap. I never would have guessed just how big it would become. It's hard to accurately describe the feeling of going viral for the first time. The best I can come up with is that it's like you're dropped into the ocean with stray planks of wood, nails and a hammer. As you're frantically treading water, you're also trying to figure out how to build your boat at the same time. I'm proud that we built The Mystery Hour slowly from underground hit, to television, to syndication with good, live crowds—all in Springfield. The operative word here is "slowly." We slowly built things in a nice stair-step fashion. Then, with one video, I was getting calls and emails from press around the world and from people in the entertainment industry in New York and Los Angeles

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Launching a Subscription Service of Its Own, Fullscreen Joins a Crowded Streaming Market

March 30, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The past half decade has seen the rise of the multichannel network, where thousands of creators produce hundreds of hours of content to satisfy millions of subscribers. They are video collectives built on the back of the free service YouTube. But as such networks grow up, they are realizing "free" (or ad-supported only) content won't pay the bills. Defy Media, AOL and YouTube have recently launched paid services. The newest entrant is Fullscreen, the 5-year-old brainchild of YouTube veteran George Strompolos, who's hoping that among his 600 million subscribers, there are enough superfans willing to pay $5 a month for premium content with no ads. And Strompolos knows just who to target. "We're very specifically going after the teen and young audience that grew up in the social and mobile-first environment," Strompolos said. Fullscreen is not looking to compete with big-time SVOD services like Netflix and Hulu. Instead, Strompolos is looking to monetize younger viewers—the 13-30 set—who are already watching. Fullscreen's subscription service, called fullscreen, launches April 26 and will cost $4.99 per month, cheaper than YouTube Red ($10 per month) and more in line with NBCU's Seeso ($3.99) and Defy Media's Screenjunkies Plus ($4.99). It will be available on iPhone, iPad, some Android devices and Chromecast. So, what sets Fullscreen's subscription service apart from the others? Strompolos says it's all about community. "[Other services] do a really good job of giving you content," he said, "but they haven't necessarily succeeded in creating an environment where people discuss content." Strompolos wants the service to feel more like a hangout where subscribers chat about the content and become creators themselves. "They can make GIFs and riff off the content, really create the foundation for a community," he said. The service will feature a mix of original content from Fullscreen creators and licensed content. The originals are anchored by Grace Helbig and Hannah Hart's revival of Sid and Marty Krofft's 1970s TV series, Electra Woman and Dyna Girl; Paul Scheer and Jonathan Stern's Filthy Preppy Teen$; and Jack & Dean of All Trades

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Viceland Launches VR Partnership With Samsung and Downplays Weak Early TV Ratings Data

March 28, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As it nears its one-month anniversary, Viceland is expanding its stable of advertising partners by striking a new virtual reality deal with Samsung. But the network is also downplaying early ratings data that indicates soft initial audience interest in the cable network that replaced H2. Viceland and Samsung unveiled a major partnership today to create new virtual reality content for both companies' platforms. The companies are enlisting big names in film, music and gaming to create VR projects for Samsung Milk VR, Samsung's virtual reality content service which is exclusive to the SamsungGear VR headset. The first one will focus on VR pioneer Chris Milk (founder and CEO of Vrse) and highlight his work in the VR space. The partnership launches with this two-minute spot, which will air tonight on Viceland. As part of the partnership, Viceland and Samsung will co-produce a documentary series about the VR creators as they work on these projects. They will premiere as native ads on Viceland prime-time programming, while 30-second versions of each documentary will run during Viceland commercial breaks. "We want to pioneer storytelling 'beyond the frame' and to connect with audiences in completely new, and emotional, ways," said Eddy Moretti, Vice's chief creative officer and Viceland's co-president, in a statement about the new efforts. The new partnership is part of Viceland's efforts to shake up TV advertising by reducing ad load and running more native ads . Viceland hopes to have native ads—which are created by Vice Media to look more like editorial content—represent half its ad inventory within the year. "Vice has always been more successful when it's done native advertising and interesting custom partnerships with brands, and then you extend that idea to this TV network also," said Guy Slattery, general manager for Viceland, told Adweek earlier this month. Early ratings woes? The announcement comes three days after an International Business Times report said ratings had plummeted since Viceland replaced H2 on Feb. 29. According to the story, which cited data from Rentrak, Viceland's average daily viewership over its first three weeks (55,000) is 77 percent lower than H2's numbers during its final three weeks (241,000). A Viceland spokesman said that Rentrak data was "inaccurate," noting that it doesn't focus on the 18-34 demo that Viceland is targeting, which is much younger than the 25-54 demo that had tuned in for H2.

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With Its Total Audience Measurement Delayed, Nielsen Will Share More Connected TV Data

March 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Networks will have to wait a few months longer for full access to Nielsen's new Total Audience Measurement data, but in the interim, the company is preparing to share more information about usage of connected TV devices like Roku and Apple TV. Nielsen announced today that beginning April 25, it will make brand-level data available from connected TV devices, including streaming video devices and game consoles—Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, Google Chromecast, Xbox, Sony PlayStation and Nintendo Wii—as well as enabled smart TVs. This will allow clients to track how many homes across the country own TV connected devices and which brands, and how those numbers grow over time. Clients will be able to determine how much time people spend with devices overall and link program viewing to those specific devices. The company is also creating a new metric called Total Use of Television (TUT), which adds connected TV usage to linear usage for what Nielsen calls "a complete view" of TV usage. "Our device breakout data will report how much viewing to a particular network, program, episode or telecast came from a particular device type or device brand for measured content," said Sara Erichson, evp, client solutions and audience insights.

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How FX Bids for New Series Without the Big Budget of Netflix

March 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As streaming services like Netflix, Amazon and Hulu snap up original series away from linear networks, as well as lure creators with big paydays and promises of creative autonomy, their competitors have had to alter their approaches to bidding for new projects. One of those is FX, which lost out on the bidding for Aziz Ansari's comedy Master of None and the upcoming drama The Crown. Both of those shows went to Netflix after the streaming service "overwhelmed us with shock and awe levels of money and commitment," FX CEO John Landgraf told reporters in January . He also used a "Moneyball" analogy when comparing FX to Netflix, explaining, "Basically, we're competing against payrolls, if you will, a la the Oakland A's and New York Yankees, that are three or four times ours." Because he can't match Netflix dollar for dollar, Landgraf has shifted the focus of his pitches, highlighting other attributes of the network when bidding for shows. Landgraf highlights his marketing team, which has been named PromaxBDA's In-House Marketing Team of the Year for five consecutive years. "I think the talent appreciates that," he told Adweek. Landgraf also emphasizes the personal touch and attention he can give FX's shows versus Netflix, which now has 100 series in the pipeline—55 for adults, 45 for children. "Our network is more of a bespoke organization than a factory. We're at about 18 shows, and that's the most that I can personally pay attention to," said Landgraf. While he could maybe do as many as 20, "I'm at the max in terms of being able to read scripts, watch rough cuts, have a thoughtful input and dialogue." And that's important, even when the network doesn't have much creative feedback in terms of notes for producers. Landgraf said that his deal with Louis CK for Louie specified that the network wasn't able to give him notes.

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State Farm Is Being Featured in Tonight’s Episode of Black-ish

March 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Faced with declining overnight ratings and the myriad ways viewers can avoid ads, some brands are beginning to master the art of product placement, and networks are reaping the rewards. Last season, ABC's hit comedy Modern Family produced an episode shot entirely with Apple products. But that integration—in an episode called "Connection Lost"—was not a paid placement. Tonight, another ABC sitcom incorporates a well-known brand into its storyline, but this time, it gets something in return. On Black-ish, advertising executive Dre Johnson (played by Anthony Anderson) persuades his client, State Farm Insurance, to sponsor his son's basketball team, the "State Farm Good Neighbors." The integration, created in partnership with Omnicom agency The Marketing Arm, fits with State Farm's already sizeable footprint in basketball—it's a brand partner of the NCAA, NBA and WNBA.

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PopSugar Will Now Create Health and Fitness Content for TV

March 3, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

You may not have heard of the TV network Z Living. It's an Indian-owned health and fitness channel that, while available in 169 countries around the world, has yet to make a meaningful dent stateside. You've probably heard of PopSugar, one of the strongest brands among millennial women, with some 44 million monthly uniques according to comScore. Z Living is in need of programming. And that's where PopSugar comes in. The two have inked a wide-ranging production deal. "I think the brands are really well aligned," said Rafe Oller, Z Living's general manager, who approached PopSugar Studios president David Grant when looking for ways to work together. "We've got a certain audience and a high level of engagement," Grant said. PopSugar will create TV versions of their online series, including Class FitSugar. They'lll also develop a prime time series exclusively for Z Living. All of the shows will be branded 'PopSugar on Z Living.' Fitness has become a major growth area for PopSugar which, in January, saw month over month growth of 36 percent, making it the top vertical for the multichannel network.

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YouTube Star PewDiePie Can Now Win a Primetime TV Emmy

March 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

PewDiePie already boasts the largest following on YouTube, and now the popular creator could add another accomplishment to his list: an Emmy award. Today the Television Academy announced it has expanded and redefined many short-form categories for this year's Primetime Emmys. The Academy added three awards: Outstanding Short Form Series, Variety; Outstanding Individual Actor in a Short Form Series; and Outstanding Individual Actress in a Short Form Series. The Academy also renamed the Short Format Live Entertainment category as Outstanding Short Form Series, Comedy or Drama; and Short Format Nonfiction is now Outstanding Short Form Series, Reality/Nonfiction. The Academy defines a short-form series as having a minimum of six episodes that average 15 minutes or less. "Our industry is aggressively, quickly and creatively evolving the various ways episodic stories are told," said TV Academy chairman and CEO Bruce Rosenblum. "These category changes reflect the broader opportunities that emerging networks and distribution platforms, such as Maker Studios, Fullscreen, Crackle, AwesomenessTV, YouTube Red, Adult Swim and others, are seizing in choosing innovative formats that enable our television community to share stories in novel and entertaining ways." While the big streaming players like Netflix, Amazon and Hulu have qualified for TV Emmy nominations—and have won many—other digital players that don't have the budget for 30- or 60-minute episodes have largely been ignored. Until now, if a digital short longed for a prize, it would have to vie for a Webby or Streamy, which are based on fan votes.

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SheKnows Media Joins the Ranks of First-Time Presenters at This Year’s NewFronts

March 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The 2016 Digital Content NewFronts, now just two months away, will feature the largest roster of companies vying for a slice of the $3 billion digital-video advertising pie. Among the 37 presenting companies are six first-timers , including Playboy, Mashable and Hearst. The latest to join that group is SheKnows Media, the parenting, entertainment and lifestyle brand that reaches 90 million unique visitors per month. SheKnows replaces Vevo, the video music hub, which dropped out of the annual digital marketplace. "It felt like the right time for us to join," Samantha Skey, president and CMO for SheKnows Media, told Adweek. "We've spent a lot of time and effort experimenting with video content and what our audience wants from us." While Skey didn't divulge specifics on what SheKnows will present to media buyers, she said the company is focusing on growing its Hatch and The Pitch products.

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Custom Spots for Honda Help Promote Comedy Central’s Late-Night Comedy Crossover

February 25, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Two of Comedy Central's late-night correspondents, Jordan Klepper and Mike Yard, have found a new use for Honda's 2016 Civic: drag racing, at least until the network's legal department wisely steps in. That's the premise of one of two custom spots for Honda. And it all leads up to Comedy Central's Late Night Showdown, a crossover event that pits members of the network's three late-night series in a Battle of the Network Stars-like event. Klepper, from The Daily Show, and Yard, who appears on The Nightly Show with Larry Wilmore, will be joined by @midnight's Ron Funches on a special episode of @midnight Monday night. To help promote the event, Comedy Central got Klepper and Yard to create custom spots for Honda, including the drag-racing stunt, which debuts tonight during The Daily Show.

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