Posts Tagged ‘video’

Tic Tac Calls Donald Trump’s Behavior ‘Completely Inappropriate and Unacceptable’

October 8, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After becoming the latest brand to get dragged into the presidential election on Friday, Tic Tac has a blunt response. On Friday, The Washington Post published a video that they obtained showing a vulgar and lewd conversation about women between Trump and TV personality Billy Bush in 2005 while the two were taping an Access Hollywood segment with Days of our Lives actress Arianne Zucker. At about one minute into the three-minute clip, Trump tells Bush, "I better use some Tic Tacs just in case I start kissing her. (Refering to Zucker) You know I'm automatically attracted to beautiful—I just start kissing them. It's like a magnet. Just kiss. I don't even wait." Today, Tic Tac responded to the name-drop in the video on Twitter, saying, "Tic Tac respects all women. We find the recent statements and behavior completely inappropriate and unacceptable." Tic Tac respects all women

Read More

How Marvel Juggles the Development of 6 Intertwined Netflix Superhero Shows

September 30, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

TV's crowded superhero genre needs to make room for a new entry today, as Netflix drops the first season of Marvel's Luke Cage. It's the third entry in what is now a six-series universe of Netflix shows revolving around Marvel's street-level heroes and villains in New York's Hell's Kitchen. Almost three years ago, Marvel and Netflix announced four separate series—Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Iron Fist and Luke Cage—to culminate in an Avengers-style team-up in a miniseries called The Defenders. Since then, Netflix has released two seasons of Daredevil (and ordered Season 3 in July), one season of Jessica Jones (and ordered Season 2 in January) and now Luke Cage. In April, it announced a spinoff series, The Punisher, centering around the character (played by Jon Bernthal) who was introduced in Daredevil's second season. That makes six Netflix Marvel series in all—with some characters appearing in multiple shows, like Luke Cage, who was first introduced last fall in Jessica Jones—which need to be plotted out and juggled by Jeph Loeb, Marvel's head of television and the executive producer of all Marvel's television series. While Marvel has announced its film schedule for the next several years (it currently extends to a fourth Avengers film due on May 3, 2019, with three 2020 release dates already earmarked for still unnamed films), the company plays things much closer to the vest on the TV side. Next year will bring Iron Fist and The Defenders and then … only Loeb knows for sure. "We very much have a schedule as to when things are happening, but we have chosen to say, look, this is where we are right now," said Loeb. "I also personally tend to find that when you talk about something that's coming, as opposed to what is happening right now, that people want to talk about the new thing, the new, shiny penny." Also, Marvel is ultimately at the mercy of Netflix and the other networks that air its shows. "Unlike the motion picture division, which has the ability to say, 'On this date we're doing Ant-Man 2,' the television driving is always going to be talking to our [network partners], and they're the ones that are going to tell us whether or not there's going to be another season," said Loeb. "I can't do anything about that. All we can do is tell the best stories we can and hope that the audience comes." But it also makes things more challenging for the showrunners behind Netflix's Marvel shows who not only have to wait to find out whether their shows will be renewed, but at which point in the ongoing saga the next season will actually air. Jessica Jones showrunner Melissa Rosenberg said that Season 2 will air at some point after The Defenders, but she didn't have any input as to when it would be slotted. "I just show up when they tell me to and pick up the pieces that are laying there for me, and start to play," said Rosenberg. Before she began to plot out the story lines for Jessica Jones' second season, Rosenberg met with Doug Petrie and Marco Ramirez, the Daredevil Season 2 showrunners who are overseeing The Defenders, for a detailed rundown of what was in store for her characters in that miniseries

Read More

Ad of the Day: Pine-Sol Is Clueless, Except When It Comes to Cleaning, in 19 Fun Prerolls

September 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Most folks won't be floored by these brief, humorous Pine-Sol vignettes. But that's probably OK with the venerable brand, which set out to display its versatility and show viewers that its grease- and stain-fighting action works on lots of household stuff, not just floors. Running as YouTube pre-rolls geared to the site's most popular searches—from "funny cat videos" to "makeup tutorials"—each ad opens by explaining something the product can't do. For example, in the clip below, will Kitty leap onto the table or the countertop? Pine-Sol concedes it hasn't got a clue. But it has got the right stuff to make either surface shine: Heh, Mr. Boddington's all like, "I'm stock footage—meow!" Using stock exclusively allowed Pine-Sol to keep the costs low across 19 videos. "The work was designed to resonate with the audience by meeting them where they are, and talking about the things they're talking about—literally," says Stefan Smith, senior copywriter at Critical Mass, which developed the campaign. "Our target is too clever and focused to watch something they don't connect with right away, and Pine-Sol isn't something they are naturally enthused about." C'mon, dude, who isn't enthused about Pine-Sol? (Maybe they'll put you on a car account next time.) Oh, and the tagline changes to fit each ad. "Pine-Sol. We're not cats" serves Mr. B. well enough, but aspiring rockers get a different slogan: Wow, "We don't rock" shows admirable self-awareness, Pine-Sol! Kidding, of course. You absolutely rock—as much as any household cleaner can

Read More

The People v. O.J. Simpson, Game of Thrones Dominate 2016 Emmys

September 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On the night before the 2016-17 TV season began, the television industry honored its very best shows and actors at the 68th Emmy Awards—and the broadcast networks once again found themselves dominated by cable and streaming networks. For three hours on ABC, a series of broadcast stars strode onstage at the Microsoft Theater, and more often than not, presented Emmys to HBO's Game of Thrones, FX's The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story, and Amazon's Transparent. Of 27 Emmy awards, just four went to broadcast outlets: Kate McKinnon won for supporting actress in a comedy (NBC's Saturday Night Live), NBC's The Voice was named best reality competition program, Regina King won for supporting actress in a limited series (ABC's American Crime) and Fox's Grease: Live was honored for directing in a variety special. HBO and FX dominated the evening, with 6 Emmys apiece, led by Game of Thrones and The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story. Netflix and Amazon were also well represented (with 3 and 2 awards, respectively), and even BBC America snuck in, as Orphan Black's Tatiana Maslany, who read her acceptance speech via smartphone, was a surprise pick for best actress in a drama series

Read More

Ad of the Day: Millennial Smokers Get Left Out in Truth’s New FOMO-Filled Ads

August 25, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The tobacco-slagging Truth campaign is back to inspire, or maybe just torture, teenagers with more anti-smoking rhymes. A new ad, set to air during this Sunday's MTV Video Music Awards, focuses on a statistic largely overlooked among millennials—that people who habitually suck down cigarettes have significantly less cash than people who don't. And it does that, for better or worse, in song form. "I'm stuck with Pee-Pop, who smells like a foot, while my squad's at the movies, and they're seeing something good," raps the first young man in the minute-long video, as he laments not being able to afford to join his pals—he's broke because he smokes. It's part of a new ad push, unified under the hashtag #Squadless and created by Truth's agency, 72andSunny. With some two and a half minutes of airtime scheduled for the VMAs, the campaign is the organization's largest on the show since first partnering with it in 2014. Based on research that showed 88 percent of 15- to 25-year-olds didn't know that smokers have an average of 20 percent less income than non-smokers, the campaign will also include a :60 featuring a Diplo track, as well as digital and social components that will featuring singer Macy Kate and Vine star George Janko. And in perhaps the most brain-meltingly millennial media themed sentence ever, the release reads: "YouTube personality Timothy DeLaGhetto, Vine stars Lele Pons and Brent Rivera, will also support the #Squadless campaign by creating their own rap verses to start a rap battle on MTV's VMA Pre-Show Snapchat live story." One or two of those names might be vaguely familiar to the olds in the audience—at least, the olds familiar with Truth's advertising. Last year, DeLaGhetto had a hand in the campaign's Tinder-themed anti-smoking ad, a full-blown music video that left some, if not many, viewers reeling, and desperate for a cigarette. (Earlier this year, meanwhile, Truth was seen urging audiences to save the art of cat videos by not exposing felines to second-hand smoke—an effort that included an awkward "Peetition" requiring would-be signatories to share pictures or their pets urinating.) The new musical number is short, at least, and despite sporting one of the more obvious and stilted lyrical flows in the history of hip-hop (if it can be called that), manages one brilliant line, from the guy whose empty pockets leave him enough free time to become a Photoshop god. Confined to his room, he confesses: "I don't have the memories or experiences to share, but I can put my head on the body of a bear." That moment of charming idiocy is the ad's first saving grace (though it could reasonably be argued that the kid should be grateful for his newfound skill, which in the modern economy he might be able to parlay into a better-paying job). The second redeeming moment comes in slapstick form, when a young woman faceplants in the dirt from a significant height, though the point on which it's based is perhaps a bit convoluted: "If you smoke, you'll end up with a face full of bee stings, because you tried to climb a tree to see a concert your friends were going to but had no money to buy a ticket." In other words, the set pieces are willfully absurd—which itself wouldn't be a bad thing, if they didn't also come across as contortionist attempts to avoid preaching. The larger point, meanwhile—suggesting smoking cigarettes will lead to being alone—might seem counterintuitive, given that lighting up is often a social habit. More likely it's clever, though, given that the point is clearly meant to hit millennials where it counts—in their infamous FOMOs. But mostly, and unfortunately, what the ad seems to convey, is that do-gooder marketing executives think what kids really want these days is to cringe endlessly. That's a shame, given how important the message is. Or maybe it's an ingenious sleeper strategy, insofar as one of the best arguments for everyone everywhere quitting smoking forever is that nobody would ever have to cringe at one of these intentionally embarrassing spots again.

Read More

Amazon Dedicates September to Comedy by Releasing 4 Series, Including One From Woody Allen

August 7, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The broadcast networks aren't the only ones rolling out most of their comedies when the new TV season kicks off in September. Amazon will debut four of its comedies, including the third season of Transparent, that same month. "This September will be Amazon's month of comedy, where we will debut four new comedy series in a row, the first streaming service to do so. We're calling it Amazon's month of comedy, unless we come up with something better before September," Amazon Studios' head of half-hour series Joe Lewis said today at the Television Critics Association's summer press tour in L.A. One Mississippi, starring comedian Tig Notaro and inspired by her life, debuts on Sept. 9. Fleabag, starring Phoebe Waller-Bridge (who also wrote every episode) as a detached London woman, airs on Sept. 16. The critically-acclaimed Transparent returns for Season 3 on Sept. 23.

Read More

CBS Spins Off Carpool Karaoke Into Its Own Series, on Apple Music

July 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The Late Late Show with James Corden wasn't kidding about trying to beat Spike's new rival series (also combining cars and karaoke) to the punch. Today, CBS Television Studios announced that Apple Music had landed global rights to Carpool Karaoke, a series based on the wildly popular segment from The Late Late Show. It will be created and produced by Corden and Late Late Show executive producer Ben Winston. The weekly series will consist of 16 episodes, in which celebrities ride along with the host and "visit places meaningful to the celebrity," according to the release. A host (which is very unlikely to be Corden) and premiere date will be announced later. CBS said Carpool Karaoke will also continue as a recurring segment on The Late Late Show. Apple Music is available in more than 100 countries. The service, which gives subscribers access to more than 30 million songs, costs $9.99 per month. While the show is obviously a good fit for Apple Music, it's still surprising that CBS didn't put the series on its own fledgling streaming service, CBS All Access. Executive producers had initially been dismissive of efforts to spin off Carpool Karaoke, as The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon had done with Lip Sync Battle on Spike

Read More

How Time Inc.’s New Video-Only Platform Hopes to Unearth the Next Big Digital Star

July 1, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As the digital video ecosystem has exploded over the past five years, it's given rise to a new kind of celebrity: Those who are able to amass large swaths of fans without having to be on a traditional media platform. Now that the industry, along with advertisers, has accepted the importance of digitally-born stars, Time Inc. saw the perfect opportunity to extend its coverage of the traditional celebrity space into YouTube, Vine and Instagram. Announced during its NewFronts presentation , Time Inc. formally took the wraps off Instant , its new mobile-first video-only brand, during last week's VidCon. Instant launched with Degree Deodorant as the exclusive sponsor for the first six months; all the advertising will be either sponsored or branded content. Instant, which is built exclusively for mobile consumption, though it can be viewed on desktops—caters to a growing fanbase that sees YouTubers like Lilly Singh in the same vein as a Jennifer Lawrence. But it's also for those older generations who may not be up to speed on the fast-growing ecosystem. "The goal with Instant is for my grandmother to be able to go onto the site and enjoy herself and get caught up," said Instant editorial director Kirstin Benson. "These digital artists ebb and flow; some of them back out of the industry and there's new ones every day." Instant will be run by Time's two celebrity and pop culture brands People and Entertainment Weekly and will also work with YouNow and Launching a new media brand in today's oversaturated world is akin to asking viewers to find a needle in a very large haystack. But Benson, who has experience launching new digital platforms after heading up WhoSay, says that using the clout of People and EW gives Instant a massive leg up. "The space is so crowded," she said. "Those two outlets help give us the street cred that we would need." One way Instant will look to gain relevancy is to become the place that will unearth the next big digital star, which has become a key goal across the entire industry . Two of Instant's series, You Should Follow and The Instant Mix, are dedicated to finding untapped talent. "We are literally crawling the internet," said Benson, who adds they're focusing on international talent as well

Read More

Is There a Formula for Success at Cannes?

June 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Cannes Lions, the biggest advertising event in the world, is here. Vive les ads! Brands and agencies are keeping their fingers crossed that their campaigns will win the hearts and eyes of the judging panel in the south of France. But just what makes a Cannes winner? Is there something in the DNA of an ad that makes an award winner? Is there a formula for Lions success? Unruly dug into the data to find out if previous Grand Prix winners had anything in common that helped them stand out from the crowd. We analyzed four previous Cannes winners—Geico's "Unskippable: Family" (2015), Volvo Trucks' "Epic Split" (2014), Metro Trains Melbourne's "Dumb Ways to Die" (2013) and Nike's "Write the Future" (2011)—to see if there were any key themes or insights to success at Cannes. Here are the results: Winning Critical Success Didn't Necessarily Drive Business Results While these videos undoubtedly are beautifully made, highly recognized in the industry and worthy of creative accolades, brand recall and brand favorability from our panel were surprisingly lower than the industry average. Geico was the only advertiser to exceed global averages, including brand favorability (40 percent), purchase intent (40 percent) and brand recall (89 percent). Global averages are generally 29 percent for brand favorability, 31 percent for purchase intent and 74 percent for brand recall. This was most likely due to the prominent Geico logo, which appeared at the five-second mark of the "Unskippable" ad and remained on screen while the silent family held their poses.

Read More

Infographic: Who’s Winning the Race on YouTube, Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump?

June 9, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Donald Trump is usually quick to boast about how much he's winning—in politics, in business, etc., etc., etc. But now, it appears he's winning on YouTube as well, according to web analytics firm Zefr. Zefr's analysis of YouTube views for the month of May found that videos about the presumptive Republican nominee have amassed many millions more views than the combined total of Democrat rivals Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. Views of Trump-related videos increased by 42.8 percent from April to May to a total of 254 million. Meanwhile, the total 106 million views of Clinton-related videos were only up 0.68 percent from the previous month. Total views for Sanders videos fell 16.25 percent to 69.7 million. "If all publicity is indeed good publicity, then Trump has a huge advantage," said Dave Rosner, Zefr's evp of strategic marketing. However, nearly half of Trump-related views (47 percent) were for videos that expressed a negative sentiment about the candidate, while only 17 percent were positive. (The remaining 36 percent were neutral.) For Clinton, sentiment was even more negative—48 percent compared with 4 percent positive and 47 percent neutral

Read More