Posts Tagged ‘video’

Black and Decker Got Belgians to Eat Dinner Right Off the Floor of an Old Post Office

December 5, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Everybody's heard the saying—often in reference to how well someone kept house—that the floor was so clean you could eat off it. But nobody really meant that literally, did they? Well, Black and Decker evidently does. To nudge sales of its Steam-Mop in Europe, the brand's agency These Days cooked up the idea of finding a well-trod floor, cleaning it, and serving dinner on top. "After we got the brief to promote the Steam-Mop as a product that kills 99.9 percent of all bacteria, we were pretty quickly reminded of the expression 'you could eat off the floor here,'" said creative director Manuel Ostyn. Ostyn's team could have picked a floor that was relatively clean to start with, but what fun would that be? Instead, it chose the floor of an old post office in the Belgian city Antwerp, a building that's since been converted to an upscale food market called the Mercado. The marble floors there see millions of footsteps a day, most of them right off the street. These Days marked off a large area with white tape to keep people away, then went over the floor—several times—with the steam appliance.

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As Social Platforms and Brands Turn to Live Video, Will Viewers Keep Tuning In?

December 5, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

A week before Thanksgiving, dozens of sharply dressed young men and women began arriving at Taco Bell's headquarters for the fourth annual Friendsgiving feast, which included rolled turkey tacos and turkey-and-stuffing-filled "Golden Quesalupas." While the event is usually exclusive to social media influencers and celebrities, this year, Taco Bell had one special seat for everyone—and anyone—by broadcasting the dinner on Facebook Live . "One of the requests we always get from fans is that they always want to experience the event with us," said Jozlynn Rush, Taco Bell's social and digital strategist. As many as 150,000 people tuned in for the dinner at any given time. The video, which first appeared on Nov. 17, has since reached 1.2 million views—without a single ad. "It was pretty amazing," said Rush, who added that her team plans to serve up a healthy portion of Facebook Live in the coming months. This holiday season is proving to be a fertile testing ground for the burgeoning space of branded livestreaming. For instance, ahead of Black Friday, Lowe's reached a live audience of 32,000 as it unveiled 10 on-sale products, while another 891,000 people saw promoted posts over the next two days. Taco Bell's Friendsgiving feast was on Facebook Live this year. Research firm MarketsandMarkets has forecasted that live video will be a $70 billion industry by 2021. That represents good news for Facebook Inc., which has been aggressively promoting Facebook Live with TV spots. This month, Facebook-owned Instagram also launched its own live feature, which lets users broadcast for an hour before the video disappears. "Live content is uniquely compelling when it offers rarity," said Topher Burns, group director of product innovation at Deep Focus.

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Google Says Faster Mobile Ads Are Boosting Clickthrough Rates Up to 200 Percent

December 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As tech giants continue their push to speed up load times for advertising and publishers across the mobile web, early numbers from one of them seem to show that faster ads really do work better. According to research released today by Google and Teads, the video tech company, mobile publishers using Google's AMP (Accelerated Mobile Pages) video inventory perform better than those that stick with the traditional mobile web. Results showed publishers using AMP, an open-source Google initiative, saw clickthrough rates increase by 200 percent, completion rates increase by 15 percent and ad performance increase 18 percent. Nearly 100 publishers are now using AMP including Mashable, Rodale, L'Express and Trinity Mirror. In a blog post detailing the findings, Eric Shih, global svp of business development at Teads, said videos by brands and publishers don't just need to be fast, they also should "engage, educate and entertain." "If you've ever waited impatiently for your favorite site to load only to watch an annoying pop-up take over your smartphone screen, you can probably understand why user engagement decreases," Shih wrote.

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European Pay TV Network Sky Ups Zai Bennett to U.K. Content Chief (Report)

November 17, 2016  |  Variety  |  No Comments

European pay-TV operator Sky has promoted Zai Bennett, formerly head of premium drama channel Sky Atlantic in the U.K., to director of programs, Sky Entertainment U.K. and Ireland, according to reports. More to follow.

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Facebook Users May Soon See Multiple Products Featured in a Single News Feed Ad

November 15, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Ahead of the holiday season, Facebook is testing a different kind of product ad that lets retailers showcase more than one item within the news feed. The two-click process seems to be focused on both brand awareness and direct response. The ads pair a main image or video along with related product images underneath and, if clicked, then bring up a second page with more products. If clicked again, the ad leads to the retailer's website where a consumer can actually buy the product. (The launch comes just weeks after Facebook-owned Instagram began letting more than a dozen retailers focus more specifically on ecommerce by tagging products in photos that then lead to a way to buy items online.) Some retailers like Michael Kors and Lowes have already begun testing the Facebook format this week. However, a Facebook spokesperson said other brands will ramp up their own campaigns later this month and through the holiday season. More could join early next year, with other industries beyond retail possibly added if retailers are pleased with results. According to Michael Kors, which has been using the format along with the rest of its fall campaign, cost per conversion has fallen by 79 percent. Instead of focusing too much on targeting a user with a single product, the goal is to give people enough items that might prompt them to shop more. The ads in some ways seem reminiscent of Google's " showcase shopping " ad format that launched for retailers this summer. Those ads, featured in Google search, aim to connect retailers with potential buyers who might be interested in a product even if their search query isn't quite exact. The formats seem to potentially point to a broader trend toward clustering retail items in a way that brings a number of product listing ads underneath a single main piece of creative. The approach gives users more ideas to consider beyond just the one image they might or might not be interested in. According to Facebook, this approach drives more visual discovery by letting retailers use as many as 50 products to target users.

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Adobe Buys Programmatic Ad Player TubeMogul for $540 Million

November 10, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In a deal to bolster its video offerings for advertisers, Adobe has acquired demand-side platform TubeMogul for $540 million. Programmatic-geared TubeMogul works with brands like Dannon and Quiznos to run digital, mobile and video campaigns by powering the ad-tech pipes in platforms like Facebook and Snapchat. According to Adobe, TubeMogul will get plugged into Adobe Marketing Cloud, the company's tool to help brands manage digital campaigns, primarily in display, social and search. As brands' spending on digital video continues to increase, the addition of TubeMogul will theoretically help Adobe grab bigger digital budgets. The deal is expected to close in the first quarter of 2017. "Adobe and TubeMogul will provide a unified advertising and data management solution that enables brands to precisely identify the right segments and plan, execute and measure paid media across any device," TubeMogul CEO Brett Wilson said in a statement.

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Tic Tac Calls Donald Trump’s Behavior ‘Completely Inappropriate and Unacceptable’

October 8, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After becoming the latest brand to get dragged into the presidential election on Friday, Tic Tac has a blunt response. On Friday, The Washington Post published a video that they obtained showing a vulgar and lewd conversation about women between Trump and TV personality Billy Bush in 2005 while the two were taping an Access Hollywood segment with Days of our Lives actress Arianne Zucker. At about one minute into the three-minute clip, Trump tells Bush, "I better use some Tic Tacs just in case I start kissing her. (Refering to Zucker) You know I'm automatically attracted to beautiful—I just start kissing them. It's like a magnet. Just kiss. I don't even wait." Today, Tic Tac responded to the name-drop in the video on Twitter, saying, "Tic Tac respects all women. We find the recent statements and behavior completely inappropriate and unacceptable." Tic Tac respects all women

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How Marvel Juggles the Development of 6 Intertwined Netflix Superhero Shows

September 30, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

TV's crowded superhero genre needs to make room for a new entry today, as Netflix drops the first season of Marvel's Luke Cage. It's the third entry in what is now a six-series universe of Netflix shows revolving around Marvel's street-level heroes and villains in New York's Hell's Kitchen. Almost three years ago, Marvel and Netflix announced four separate series—Daredevil, Jessica Jones, Iron Fist and Luke Cage—to culminate in an Avengers-style team-up in a miniseries called The Defenders. Since then, Netflix has released two seasons of Daredevil (and ordered Season 3 in July), one season of Jessica Jones (and ordered Season 2 in January) and now Luke Cage. In April, it announced a spinoff series, The Punisher, centering around the character (played by Jon Bernthal) who was introduced in Daredevil's second season. That makes six Netflix Marvel series in all—with some characters appearing in multiple shows, like Luke Cage, who was first introduced last fall in Jessica Jones—which need to be plotted out and juggled by Jeph Loeb, Marvel's head of television and the executive producer of all Marvel's television series. While Marvel has announced its film schedule for the next several years (it currently extends to a fourth Avengers film due on May 3, 2019, with three 2020 release dates already earmarked for still unnamed films), the company plays things much closer to the vest on the TV side. Next year will bring Iron Fist and The Defenders and then … only Loeb knows for sure. "We very much have a schedule as to when things are happening, but we have chosen to say, look, this is where we are right now," said Loeb. "I also personally tend to find that when you talk about something that's coming, as opposed to what is happening right now, that people want to talk about the new thing, the new, shiny penny." Also, Marvel is ultimately at the mercy of Netflix and the other networks that air its shows. "Unlike the motion picture division, which has the ability to say, 'On this date we're doing Ant-Man 2,' the television driving is always going to be talking to our [network partners], and they're the ones that are going to tell us whether or not there's going to be another season," said Loeb. "I can't do anything about that. All we can do is tell the best stories we can and hope that the audience comes." But it also makes things more challenging for the showrunners behind Netflix's Marvel shows who not only have to wait to find out whether their shows will be renewed, but at which point in the ongoing saga the next season will actually air. Jessica Jones showrunner Melissa Rosenberg said that Season 2 will air at some point after The Defenders, but she didn't have any input as to when it would be slotted. "I just show up when they tell me to and pick up the pieces that are laying there for me, and start to play," said Rosenberg. Before she began to plot out the story lines for Jessica Jones' second season, Rosenberg met with Doug Petrie and Marco Ramirez, the Daredevil Season 2 showrunners who are overseeing The Defenders, for a detailed rundown of what was in store for her characters in that miniseries

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Ad of the Day: Pine-Sol Is Clueless, Except When It Comes to Cleaning, in 19 Fun Prerolls

September 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Most folks won't be floored by these brief, humorous Pine-Sol vignettes. But that's probably OK with the venerable brand, which set out to display its versatility and show viewers that its grease- and stain-fighting action works on lots of household stuff, not just floors. Running as YouTube pre-rolls geared to the site's most popular searches—from "funny cat videos" to "makeup tutorials"—each ad opens by explaining something the product can't do. For example, in the clip below, will Kitty leap onto the table or the countertop? Pine-Sol concedes it hasn't got a clue. But it has got the right stuff to make either surface shine: Heh, Mr. Boddington's all like, "I'm stock footage—meow!" Using stock exclusively allowed Pine-Sol to keep the costs low across 19 videos. "The work was designed to resonate with the audience by meeting them where they are, and talking about the things they're talking about—literally," says Stefan Smith, senior copywriter at Critical Mass, which developed the campaign. "Our target is too clever and focused to watch something they don't connect with right away, and Pine-Sol isn't something they are naturally enthused about." C'mon, dude, who isn't enthused about Pine-Sol? (Maybe they'll put you on a car account next time.) Oh, and the tagline changes to fit each ad. "Pine-Sol. We're not cats" serves Mr. B. well enough, but aspiring rockers get a different slogan: Wow, "We don't rock" shows admirable self-awareness, Pine-Sol! Kidding, of course. You absolutely rock—as much as any household cleaner can

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The People v. O.J. Simpson, Game of Thrones Dominate 2016 Emmys

September 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On the night before the 2016-17 TV season began, the television industry honored its very best shows and actors at the 68th Emmy Awards—and the broadcast networks once again found themselves dominated by cable and streaming networks. For three hours on ABC, a series of broadcast stars strode onstage at the Microsoft Theater, and more often than not, presented Emmys to HBO's Game of Thrones, FX's The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story, and Amazon's Transparent. Of 27 Emmy awards, just four went to broadcast outlets: Kate McKinnon won for supporting actress in a comedy (NBC's Saturday Night Live), NBC's The Voice was named best reality competition program, Regina King won for supporting actress in a limited series (ABC's American Crime) and Fox's Grease: Live was honored for directing in a variety special. HBO and FX dominated the evening, with 6 Emmys apiece, led by Game of Thrones and The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story. Netflix and Amazon were also well represented (with 3 and 2 awards, respectively), and even BBC America snuck in, as Orphan Black's Tatiana Maslany, who read her acceptance speech via smartphone, was a surprise pick for best actress in a drama series

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