Posts Tagged ‘video’

Off the Beaten Path: Niche Subscription Video Services Between Boom and Bubble

March 21, 2017  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Are you a fan of horror movies? Anime? Arthouse? British dramas? Whatever your off-the-beaten-path obsession is, there’s a subscription video service just for people like you out there. Parks Associates estimates that there are now close to 100 video subscription services in the U.S. and Canada. Barely a week goes by without a network or..

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As a Producer, Bryan Cranston Knew the Best Way to Save His Pilot Sneaky Pete Was to Act In It Himself

January 12, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When his iconic TV series Breaking Bad went off the air in 2013, Bryan Cranston wasn't looking to dive back into another series role. But in May 2015, when CBS passed on Sneaky Pete, the drama pilot he had co-created, co-written and executive produced, Cranston knew there was one surefire way to help the show find a second life: hire himself as an actor on the show. His instinct paid off: Amazon (and its viewers) loved the retooled pilot— significantly improved by the addition of a riveting scene with Cranston in the closing moments—and gave the show a series order. The full season, one of this year's most anticipated shows, debuts on the streaming service Friday, with Cranston appearing in all 10 episodes (he also directs an episode). Sneaky Pete stars Giovanni Ribisi as Marius, a con man who has just been released after three years in prison, where his cell mate, Pete, talked incessantly about his idyllic childhood. On the run from Cranston's Vince, Marius decides to assume Pete's identity and hide out with his family (including Margo Martindale as his grandmother), who run a struggling bail bonds business, and haven't seen Pete in 20 years. The tension escalates after Vince tracks down Marius, and threatens to remove one of his brother's fingers each week until Marius repays his debt. Cranston told Adweek that Sneaky Pete refers to his family nickname growing up. "I was raised in a lower income household, with a fractured family: I didn't have a father in my life when I was 11 to when I was an adult, and my mother become an alcoholic," he said. "What happens is you start to self-parent, and you're making mistake after mistake and just weaving your way through, looking for shortcuts," Cranston said. "So my family was even calling me Sneaky Pete: a guy who was looking for shortcuts. A guy who was circumventing responsibility and striving for mediocrity. That's fine when you're in that condition, but at some point, something has to break." It did for Cranston in his early 20s, when he embarked on a two-year motorcycle trip and realized he wanted to be an actor. When he accepted his fourth and final acting Emmy for Breaking Bad in 2014, Cranston dedicated his award to "all the Sneaky Petes out there." The day after the Emmys, Cranston received a congratulatory phone call from Sony Pictures Television co-president Zack Van Amburg: "He says, 'I think there's a series there: Sneaky Pete.' I said, 'What's the series?" And he goes, 'I don't know! But I do know this'—and he left me with this little nugget—'What happens if you didn't mature and change when you were 20 years old

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Stay-at-Home Moms Watch One More Hour of Media Per Day Than Working Mothers

January 3, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Stay-at-home mothers don't have as many devices in their homes as their working counterparts, but they make the most of those that they do have: they spend around seven and a half more hours each week watching TV and TV-connected devices than working mothers do. In Nielsen's Q3 2016 Total Audience Report, released this morning, the company focused on the media habits of mothers: working and those who stay at home. (Previous reports spotlighted millennials and the extent to which consumers are using all options available to them .) According to Nielsen's national TV panel, there are 25.1 million females in the U.S. between the ages of 18 and 49 who have one or more children under the age of 12. Nearly three-quarters of those women are working, and the older a woman is, the more likely she is to be in the workforce: Seventy-one percent of mothers between 18 and 34 are working, but that jumps to 77 percent of those between 35 and 49. While working mothers are more affluent and more likely to live in high-tech homes with several devices, stay-at-home moms spend an average of 36:26 (in hours: minutes) each week on live TV viewing and connected TV devices, which include DVR, DVD/Blu-ray, game consoles and other devices like Roku and Apple TV. That's seven and a half hours more than working mothers, who spend an average of 28:49 each week. Live TV viewing accounts for the biggest discrepancy between the two groups, with stay-at-home moms watching more than five hours of live TV each week (25:37, versus 20:08 for working mothers). While working mothers spend less time consuming media, they have access to more devices than their stay-at-home counterparts. Seventy-four percent of working moms subscribe to SVOD services like Netflix and Hulu, while just 65 percent of stay-at-home moms do. Eighty percent of working moms have tablets, compared to 72 percent of stay-at-home mothers. However, both groups have an almost identical access to smartphones: Ninety-eight percent of working moms, 96 percent of stay-at-home moms. On the social media front, stay-at-home mothers gravitate toward PCs and smartphones, while working moms use tablets. Across all devices, radio reaches the greatest number of working moms, who average 13:45 per week (stay-at-home mothers listen for an average of 12:07 each week). But stay-at-home moms spend more time with all other devices, led by smartphones: stay-at-home mothers average 22:43 per week of smartphone time, versus 20:41 for working moms. Live TV drop-off In overall viewing numbers, U.S. adults spent an average of 4:06 (in hours: minutes) tuning into live TV each day in Q3 2016, which is one minute less than the previous year

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Russell Athletic Pays Tribute to Emotional Bond Between High School Football Players and Coaches

December 27, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

High school athletes put their all into their football careers—but for most of these athletes, their senior year marks the last time they'll put on a jersey. Russell Athletic is showing how amateur football can impart valuable life lessons in its latest ads from agency Barkley. Two new videos, "Dear Seniors" and "Dear Coach" highlight the emotional bond between players and coaches. In the first video, New Palestine, Ind., high school football coach Kyle Ralph explains how his players have learned to deal with adversity and how football builds character. In the second video, one of his players responds, speaking about how Ralph taught the team lessons that would make them better people.

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Black and Decker Got Belgians to Eat Dinner Right Off the Floor of an Old Post Office

December 5, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Everybody's heard the saying—often in reference to how well someone kept house—that the floor was so clean you could eat off it. But nobody really meant that literally, did they? Well, Black and Decker evidently does. To nudge sales of its Steam-Mop in Europe, the brand's agency These Days cooked up the idea of finding a well-trod floor, cleaning it, and serving dinner on top. "After we got the brief to promote the Steam-Mop as a product that kills 99.9 percent of all bacteria, we were pretty quickly reminded of the expression 'you could eat off the floor here,'" said creative director Manuel Ostyn. Ostyn's team could have picked a floor that was relatively clean to start with, but what fun would that be? Instead, it chose the floor of an old post office in the Belgian city Antwerp, a building that's since been converted to an upscale food market called the Mercado. The marble floors there see millions of footsteps a day, most of them right off the street. These Days marked off a large area with white tape to keep people away, then went over the floor—several times—with the steam appliance.

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As Social Platforms and Brands Turn to Live Video, Will Viewers Keep Tuning In?

December 5, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

A week before Thanksgiving, dozens of sharply dressed young men and women began arriving at Taco Bell's headquarters for the fourth annual Friendsgiving feast, which included rolled turkey tacos and turkey-and-stuffing-filled "Golden Quesalupas." While the event is usually exclusive to social media influencers and celebrities, this year, Taco Bell had one special seat for everyone—and anyone—by broadcasting the dinner on Facebook Live . "One of the requests we always get from fans is that they always want to experience the event with us," said Jozlynn Rush, Taco Bell's social and digital strategist. As many as 150,000 people tuned in for the dinner at any given time. The video, which first appeared on Nov. 17, has since reached 1.2 million views—without a single ad. "It was pretty amazing," said Rush, who added that her team plans to serve up a healthy portion of Facebook Live in the coming months. This holiday season is proving to be a fertile testing ground for the burgeoning space of branded livestreaming. For instance, ahead of Black Friday, Lowe's reached a live audience of 32,000 as it unveiled 10 on-sale products, while another 891,000 people saw promoted posts over the next two days. Taco Bell's Friendsgiving feast was on Facebook Live this year. Research firm MarketsandMarkets has forecasted that live video will be a $70 billion industry by 2021. That represents good news for Facebook Inc., which has been aggressively promoting Facebook Live with TV spots. This month, Facebook-owned Instagram also launched its own live feature, which lets users broadcast for an hour before the video disappears. "Live content is uniquely compelling when it offers rarity," said Topher Burns, group director of product innovation at Deep Focus.

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Google Says Faster Mobile Ads Are Boosting Clickthrough Rates Up to 200 Percent

December 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As tech giants continue their push to speed up load times for advertising and publishers across the mobile web, early numbers from one of them seem to show that faster ads really do work better. According to research released today by Google and Teads, the video tech company, mobile publishers using Google's AMP (Accelerated Mobile Pages) video inventory perform better than those that stick with the traditional mobile web. Results showed publishers using AMP, an open-source Google initiative, saw clickthrough rates increase by 200 percent, completion rates increase by 15 percent and ad performance increase 18 percent. Nearly 100 publishers are now using AMP including Mashable, Rodale, L'Express and Trinity Mirror. In a blog post detailing the findings, Eric Shih, global svp of business development at Teads, said videos by brands and publishers don't just need to be fast, they also should "engage, educate and entertain." "If you've ever waited impatiently for your favorite site to load only to watch an annoying pop-up take over your smartphone screen, you can probably understand why user engagement decreases," Shih wrote.

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European Pay TV Network Sky Ups Zai Bennett to U.K. Content Chief (Report)

November 17, 2016  |  Variety  |  No Comments

European pay-TV operator Sky has promoted Zai Bennett, formerly head of premium drama channel Sky Atlantic in the U.K., to director of programs, Sky Entertainment U.K. and Ireland, according to reports. More to follow.

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Facebook Users May Soon See Multiple Products Featured in a Single News Feed Ad

November 15, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Ahead of the holiday season, Facebook is testing a different kind of product ad that lets retailers showcase more than one item within the news feed. The two-click process seems to be focused on both brand awareness and direct response. The ads pair a main image or video along with related product images underneath and, if clicked, then bring up a second page with more products. If clicked again, the ad leads to the retailer's website where a consumer can actually buy the product. (The launch comes just weeks after Facebook-owned Instagram began letting more than a dozen retailers focus more specifically on ecommerce by tagging products in photos that then lead to a way to buy items online.) Some retailers like Michael Kors and Lowes have already begun testing the Facebook format this week. However, a Facebook spokesperson said other brands will ramp up their own campaigns later this month and through the holiday season. More could join early next year, with other industries beyond retail possibly added if retailers are pleased with results. According to Michael Kors, which has been using the format along with the rest of its fall campaign, cost per conversion has fallen by 79 percent. Instead of focusing too much on targeting a user with a single product, the goal is to give people enough items that might prompt them to shop more. The ads in some ways seem reminiscent of Google's " showcase shopping " ad format that launched for retailers this summer. Those ads, featured in Google search, aim to connect retailers with potential buyers who might be interested in a product even if their search query isn't quite exact. The formats seem to potentially point to a broader trend toward clustering retail items in a way that brings a number of product listing ads underneath a single main piece of creative. The approach gives users more ideas to consider beyond just the one image they might or might not be interested in. According to Facebook, this approach drives more visual discovery by letting retailers use as many as 50 products to target users.

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Adobe Buys Programmatic Ad Player TubeMogul for $540 Million

November 10, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In a deal to bolster its video offerings for advertisers, Adobe has acquired demand-side platform TubeMogul for $540 million. Programmatic-geared TubeMogul works with brands like Dannon and Quiznos to run digital, mobile and video campaigns by powering the ad-tech pipes in platforms like Facebook and Snapchat. According to Adobe, TubeMogul will get plugged into Adobe Marketing Cloud, the company's tool to help brands manage digital campaigns, primarily in display, social and search. As brands' spending on digital video continues to increase, the addition of TubeMogul will theoretically help Adobe grab bigger digital budgets. The deal is expected to close in the first quarter of 2017. "Adobe and TubeMogul will provide a unified advertising and data management solution that enables brands to precisely identify the right segments and plan, execute and measure paid media across any device," TubeMogul CEO Brett Wilson said in a statement.

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