Posts Tagged ‘twitter’

Has Justine Sacco Been Fired Yet? Barry Diller’s IAC Isn’t Saying

December 21, 2013  |  Variety  |  No Comments

IAC, the Internet media company run by Barry Diller, removed the name and contact info for communications director Justine Sacco after her racially charged tweet about AIDS and Africa spawned a massive wave of outrage on Twitter. But the company has not yet confirmed whether she has been fired for the offending tweet. On Friday,... Read more

Read More

Real-Time Marketing Hits New Low, Starring Gogo and Justine Sacco

December 21, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Shutterstock/R. Gino Santa Maria When will brands learn? In a race to be crowned the next Oreo , it seems like every week another advertiser makes a really dumb decision on social media, by trying to latch on to the issue of the moment. Call it the drunk dialing of social marketing. The most recent offender is in-flight Internet provider Gogo. The company — or at least the person manning its Twitter account —  has decided that Justine Sacco’s terrible judgement is a fantastic marketing opportunity. Sacco, of course, is the IAC PR head who on Friday posted this message to Twitter — “Going to Africa. Hope I don’t get AIDS. Just kidding. I’m white!” — and then went silent, supposedly because she was on an international flight. Cue Internet frenzy, and then, a few hours later, Gogo’s classy response: Next time you plan to tweet something stupid before you take off, make sure you are getting on a @Gogo flight! CC: @JustineSacco — Gogo (@Gogo) December 21, 2013

Read More

AllThingsD Week in Review: Nokia’s Android Phone, Bitcoin Funding and Facebook the Newspaper

December 15, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

In case you missed anything, here’s a quick roundup of some of the news that powered AllThingsD this week: Most people think of Facebook as a place to share photos, keep up with friends and family members, or see and share those funny, viral stories and LOLcat pictures. This is not how Facebook thinks of Facebook. Is Nokia really working on an Android-based phone, and would Microsoft really go ahead with such a device? The answer to the first one is definitely yes. And, surprisingly, the answer to the second question may be yes, as well . The saga of Yahoo’s problematic latest Mail product continues: The Yahoo in charge of Mail made some fellow employees a bit upset when he suggested that the company would have to “kick the users hard” in a certain body part to get them to leave. Functionality is returning for many after a recent outage, but up to two weeks of mail may be missing. CEO Marissa Mayer has apologized . Facebook and Twitter let advertisers turn their (free) posts into (paid) “native ads.” Now Google+ is joining the native ad party, too — but there’s a twist . The independent videogame Minecraft is a global sensation, but it almost went down a very different path. In an excerpt from a new book about the game, we learn how Minecraft’s original creator, Markus Persson, almost took a job at Valve .

Read More

Twitter Steps Up Test of Local Tweet Discovery Feature

December 14, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

As AllThingsD first reported in April , Twitter is continuing to test a feature that surfaces nearby tweets based on a user’s location. Spotted by The Wall Street Journal in the wild, the feature looks to be a separate swipe-able timeline — and opt-in only, in its current state.

Read More

QOTD: My Favorite Waste of Time

December 13, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

All writers should have as many forms of unproductive distraction as possible. For me it used to be that I would clean drawers or rearrange my closets or start cooking lunch. I had many, many ways of pretending to be working, but not really working. So Twitter is quite marvelous at that. It is a wonderful, wonderful way of just procrastinating … – Author Susan Orlean, extolling a side benefit of Twitter, on the All Write Already! podcast

Read More

QOTD: My Favorite Waste of Time

December 13, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

All writers should have as many forms of unproductive distraction as possible. For me it used to be that I would clean drawers or rearrange my closets or start cooking lunch. I had many, many ways of pretending to be working, but not really working. So Twitter is quite marvelous at that. It is a wonderful, wonderful way of just procrastinating … – Author Susan Orlean, extolling a side benefit of Twitter, on the All Write Already! podcast

Read More

QOTD: My Favorite Waste of Time

December 13, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

All writers should have as many forms of unproductive distraction as possible. For me it used to be that I would clean drawers or rearrange my closets or start cooking lunch. I had many, many ways of pretending to be working, but not really working. So Twitter is quite marvelous at that. It is a wonderful, wonderful way of just procrastinating … – Author Susan Orlean, extolling a side benefit of Twitter, on the All Write Already! podcast

Read More

With Private Messaging, Instagram and Twitter Continue Their Arms Race

December 12, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

So Instagram introduced a version of private messaging on Thursday morning, allowing users to send photos to only one or a few of their followers at a time. And it’s a fine decision. Communication between Instagram users has been limited mainly to proxy networks to date. This knits the service together more cohesively. But more than that, it heightens the continuing battle with another popular social network: Twitter. And Twitter should be worried. Consider the similarities: Both Twitter and Instagram are based on blasting out wide distribution of content to a public follower network. Both now allow users to send media privately on a one-to-one basis. And Twitter is looking much more like Instagram lately, shifting toward full in-line photos inside users’ Twitter streams (though users can still choose solely to communicate via text). Both are trying to be, in a nutshell, the premier public media-sharing service on the Internet. “Instagram is here today because we were public from the start,” Instagram founder Kevin Systrom said in an interview. “And I think if we were a private network or if we had a symmetrical following model, we wouldn’t nearly be as big as we are today.” And make no mistake: Twitter may have 232 million monthly active users, but Instagram is big . The photo-sharing service has garnered more than 150 million monthly active users in half the time Twitter has existed. And more than 50 percent of Instagram’s users return to the service on a daily basis . That’s got to be unsettling for Twitter. The curveball in all of this, however, has been the rise of private messaging over the past few years. While Twitter and Instagram rose to prominence based on the premise of being public, both companies realize that the general public has room for forms of both public and private online expression, rather than one over another. And if not given the choice to share and communicate privately within a network, users will go elsewhere to find it

Read More

N3twork Wants to Reshape Online Discussions Around Interests

December 12, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Online forums today look like throwbacks to the Web of the 1990s. Lots of text, lots of page breaks, lots of hard-to-follow conversations. Meanwhile, more modern social media conversations on Twitter and Facebook spring up around hashtags, but they aren’t organized. You can see if a topic is trending, but Twitter offers only basic tools for curating tweets . A product called N3twork wants to be the new center for those conversations. It’s a daunting task to try to attract the people of the Internet to leave wherever they are and have their conversations on your own property. But the people behind N3twork hope people will be attracted to it because it is built expressly for mobile, and it is highly visual. Today’s active, general-purpose discussion sites, like Reddit and Wikia, are lacking on both those fronts, said N3twork CEO Neil Young in an interview at the company’s San Francisco office. “They aren’t visual. They aren’t well-integrated on the devices we have in our pockets all the time. And they have segmented audiences,” Young said. That’s the other things about N3twork — it creates personalized feeds of activity around every topic a user is interested in, so they don’t have to click around to visit each page or discussion. This is done by users following hashtags, which are the central element of the service. Users are invited to create posts that are collages of content, including Web pages, photos and videos. N3twork has a nifty trick where it captures a preview of a video and plays it silently and automatically, so the content looks alive as you scroll. But there are a couple of big challenges in launching a tool such as this. One: How are you going to get people to join and care about something, when it’s quite so broad? And two, how are you going to avoid the inevitable problem of people spamming feeds by posting over and over to various hashtags? As for the first, Young said that his experience building games at Ngmoco (which was bought by DeNA for $400 million in 2010 ) taught him and his team how to build things that grow and get people engaged.

Read More

Video Is the Future of Social

December 11, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

This past spring, at the YouTube Upfronts in New York City, Google vice president Robert Kyncl stood in front of a packed audience of brand marketers and made a seemingly simple, but revelatory, declaration: “ TV is one-way. YouTube talks back .” What is happening on YouTube and on places like Vine (which is doubling monthly average users month over month) and Instagram, is something that many of us who study the social Web have known for some time: Video is the future of social. Why video? Why not text or photos — permanent or ephemeral? Is it simply the combination of sight, sound and motion? The clues to the answer are all around us. This past week, news of the tragic death of actor Paul Walker sparked tens of thousands of people to reach out on social media to express pain and sadness, and send prayers to his family and friends. For a 48-hour period, Twitter was trending with the news, and Facebook feeds were crowded with thoughts and condolences. As activity on Facebook and Twitter waned, the heartfelt vigils have continued to grow on YouTube, where more than 6,000 tribute videos had been uploaded within 100 hours of the tragedy. These beautiful videos, along with news videos of the tragedy found on YouTube, have touched more than 170 million people. Ultimately, the tribute videos will live forever, and will be added to the vast collection of images from the star’s “Fast & Furious” movie franchise, which an audience of more than six million fans enjoy monthly on the platform. This social media outpouring on YouTube highlights the fact that the shelf life of a Tweet or a Facebook post is now vanishingly small, evidenced by the fact that a Facebook post gets half its reach within 30 minutes of being published. By comparison, more than half of YouTube videos’ lifetime views come after three weeks of uploading. Take a look at any popular video from any year, and you’ll find recent comments that continue the conversation well into the future. Yes, Facebook and Twitter are driving some of the extended activity on YouTube videos. As of last year, Facebook is driving more than 500 years of YouTube viewing every day, and on Twitter, more than 700 YouTube videos are shared every minute. But the fact is that one minute of watching, creating, sharing or commenting on a video is one minute less to engage in other social mediums

Read More