Posts Tagged ‘twitter’

‘You’re the Worst’ Star Aya Cash on Finding Validation Through Instagram

September 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Age 34 Claim to fame Stars on FXX's You're the Worst (Wednesdays, 10 p.m.); appears in the new Netflix anthology series Easy (premieres Sept. 22) Base New York Twitter @maybeAyaCash Adweek: What's the first information you consume when you wake up in the morning? Aya Cash: I would like to say that I make a cup of coffee and I read and meditate, but I absolutely pick my phone right up to check my email, and often when the show is airing, I check my social media as well. Do you not use social media when the show is on hiatus? Yeah, I try not to. I take [social media apps] off my phone on the regular, and I never have alerts turned on, which is very helpful in keeping me less engaged. But unfortunately when the show is airing, I tend to be on it way too much. I try to set boundaries. I don't think social media is innately evil; I just think the way I use it is. So how do you use it? You know, the constantly checking … I've even joked about it in posts where I'm like, "Please validate me right now because I'm feeling shitty, but here's a picture of me looking like I've never looked in my life!" Sometimes you get on and feel bad about yourself because everybody's life looks better than yours and then you look at your [social media] and realize your own life looks better than yours and you think, "What am I contributing to?!" You often Instagram your reading list, which is pretty cool. Well, my mom's a writer and I'm also an only child, so I grew up reading a lot. Once on Twitter I asked people to recommend some books for me, and I ended up reading six or seven of the recommendations and liking them all. There's actually another actress—I won't name her name—who actively pursued a friendship with me based on my reading list [laughs]. What's on your list right now

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Why Is It Still So Hard to Share Audio Files in Social Media?

September 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

While continuous advances in social media and mobile technology have warmly embraced the sharing of photos, articles and videos, audio has been left in the cold—despite the recent resurgence of podcasts. The absence of truly direct ways to share audio files, whether they be songs or podcasts, via Facebook and Twitter has left musicians and podcasters scrambling for workarounds in order to avoid the dilemma faced by application developers—fighting for attention in increasingly crowded app stores (mainly iTunes) and hoping for discoverability via search engines. For the most part, podcasters must resort to sharing links to their content, which does not endear them to social network users, who are often reluctant to click through and leave their networks for other environments, nor to the social networks themselves, as they tend to prioritize "native" content, or content uploaded directly to their networks. Workarounds do exist. Twitter's integration of audio cards from SoundCloud presented podcasters with the opportunity to post their content directly to that social network, but there are pitfalls there, too.

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Twitter Is Helping Brands Drive Conversations With ‘Instant Unlock Cards’

August 4, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Twitter is hoping the allure of exclusive content might help brands better engage with consumers and drive conversation. The company is unveiling an "Instant Unlock Card" that encourages people to tweet about a brand in order to earn rewards such as a movie trailer or an exclusive Q&A. The cards, which roll out globally today, utilize the social media network's conversational ads. The product, which debuted in January, contain images or videos with call-to-action buttons and a customizable hashtag. And Twitter says it works—during a beta test, brands saw an average earned media rate of 34 percent. (In other words, for every 100 paid impressions, the cards gained the advertiser 34 non-paid impressions.) Twitter is also launching advanced analytics to help track and measure the conversational units. The measurement tools, available through the Twitter Ads dashboard, show engagement and earned media metrics from each campaign. "Even more campaign insights are available to all global marketers through Brand Hub's Watchlist feature," according to a Twitter blog post. "See how many people are tweeting your campaign hashtag, how many impressions your campaign earned, and check out the most influential tweets. (Select US advertisers can also track the impact conversational ads have on their TrueVoice score, a metric to help track share of brand conversation in real time.)" To illustrate their effect, Twitter pointed out use cases by AMC, Coca-Cola and Marvel, which each ran campaigns on the platform using the conversational formats. For example, Coca-Cola used the conversational ads for its #TasteTheFeeling campaign and gained 180,000 mentions of Coca-Cola or the hashtag. The conversation drove the brand to become one of the top organic trends of the day.

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Snapchat Influencers Start Labeling Social Endorsements as Paid Ads

August 3, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For months, brands have leaned heavily on Snapchat's biggest celebrities to run under-the-radar campaigns that subtly promote their products in the form of sponsored posts that are seen by influencers' millions of followers. Now those creators are beginning to mark branded content with disclaimers that adhere to the Federal Trade Commission's guidelines. Unlike other platforms like Instagram and Twitter where social celebs typically have to clearly label their content as paid endorsements, sponsored content on Snapchat has been murky for marketers until recently. Snapchat doesn't have any strict rules for content creators to abide by, and it can be difficult to find misleading content since posts automatically disappear within 24 hours. But this week, a handful of the platform's biggest stars— Shaun McBride , Josh Peck and the Eh Bee Family—have posted copy that is marked with hashtags such as #paid, #ad and #sponsored to indicate that their posts are paid for by brands. "With more influencers creating content on Snapchat, you're seeing everyone follow along [with FTC guidelines,]" said Nick Cicero, CEO of Delmondo, a startup that pairs up influencers with brands. "The widely accepted industry best practice is still using #ad and you see more influencer campaigns being executed on Snapchat—it's a universal understanding." Yesterday, McBride—the Snapchat artist more commonly known as Shonduras—posted a Snapchat story from a Samsung event in New York that unveiled its new Note 7 smartphone. Before the event, McBride posted a picture with the hashtag #collab to disclose to his fans that he was being paid to post on his Snapchat account. "I usually comply with whatever the brand feels is the right decision," McBride said in an email. McBride's Snapchat story Meanwhile, YouTube and Vine family the Eh Bee Family teased a branded YouTube video created for Nintendo's Mario Kart Battle game on Snapchat yesterday with a single post marked as #paid that was uploaded using the app's recently launched Memories feature. "We just want to be transparent with our fans, and we're glad that we can upload from our camera roll as it allows us to better position FTC disclaimers without ruining the overall experience," the Eh Bee Family said in an emailed statement. Indeed, the number of celebrities disclosing their posts as paid has seemingly grown overnight. Josh Peck and David Lopez are among a handful of celebs promoting a sponsored lens from Amazon today, and Mondelez-owned Sour Patch Kids chose to have music app Musical.ly star Baby Ariel take over the brand's Snapchat account to create a story during Sunday's Teen Choice Awards that she labeled with the hashtag #ad. Social celeb Josh Peck promoted Amazon's Echo. Advertisers and creators have long struggled with labeling so-called native advertising so that it's legally disclosed but doesn't annoy an influencer's millions of followers. When Lord & Taylor failed to acknowledge that it paid 50 bloggers to photograph themselves wearing the same dress, the FTC cracked down on the retailer in March . For its part, Facebook recently loosened its grip on branded content so that publishers and creators can create custom content on the platform that is marked with sponsored tags, similar to YouTube's policies. Snapchat's ephemeral posts and lack of rules on paid content can be particularly tricky for advertisers. Alexa Mehraban, who runs the popular EatingNYC account on Instagram, recently told Adweek that branded content on Snapchat is "still a pretty gray area" compared to Instagram and other social platforms.

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Twitter Tests ‘Recommended Video’ Feature During National Shooting Coverage

July 8, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Publishers have flooded Twitter with video clips this week as they cover police shootings of civilians in Louisiana and Minnesota, and a shooting in Dallas Thursday night that killed five police officers. To help viewers stay informed, Twitter has quietly rolled out a recommended video feature that groups similar clips together, much like Facebook's suggested video feature. The videos autoplay silently in Twitter newsfeeds. When users click on a clip, the sound comes on and a landing page appears with more videos at the bottom. Here's what clicking on a clip from ABC News looked like this morning: Twitter did not immediately reply to press inquiries, but the move underscores the growing importance of social video in covering—and learning about—national tragedies. Recommended videos are only running in Twitter's iPhone app, and only appear when users click on clips directly from the newsfeed. They look similar to a feature Facebook rolled out last year called suggested video that bundles clips and ads into a stream. Similar to YouTube's revenue sharing program, Facebook gives publishers 55 percent of the revenue made from those ads. At the time of press, ads were not appearing in Twitter's recommended video player.

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Twitter Grows Users and Ad Revenue in First Quarter, but Wall Street Shrugs

April 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Twitter gained 5 million monthly active users in the first three months of 2016, breaking the social media giant's user-growth slump of the past two quarters during which it failed to gain—or actually lost—users. According to the company's first-quarter earnings statement, Twitter reported 310 million MAUs, up from the 305 million it had reported during the second half of 2015. Revenue totaled $595 million for the quarter, a 36 percent increase over the first quarter of 2015. Twitter reported $531 million in advertising revenue in the first three months of the year. That's up 39 percent from the same period in 2015. In the U.S., revenue totaled $390 million, while international revenue accounted for another $204 million. However, the company still fell short of earnings expectations, causing its stock to tumble nearly 10 percent in after-hours trading

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NFL Reveals the 10 Games That Will Air on Twitter Next Season

April 15, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The National Football League, in its attempt to remain relevant throughout the entire six-month offseason, turned the release of the 2016-17 schedule into a TV event. Thursday night, ESPN produced a 2-hour special in conjunction with the league, with more coverage on the NFL Network. The news also came in a flurry of press releases from Fox Sports, CBS Sports, ESPN and NBC Sports, which blared "THE ONLY NETWORK WITH TWO NFL PRIMETIME PACKAGES." Cord-cutting football fans also learned which games will be streamed on the league's newest media partner: Twitter. Here are the games that will be available on Twitter next season: Sept. 15: New York Jets at Buffalo Bills Sept. 22: Houston Texans at New England Patriots Oct. 6: Arizona Cardinals at San Francisco 49ers Oct

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Infographic: A TV Show’s Appeal Can Determine Ad Recall, Twitter Study Says

March 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Advertising agencies can now blame TV shows when a new spot doesn't quite get the attention they think it deserves—at least sort of. According to a new study by Twitter, Starcom and social TV analytics company Canvs, programming where an audience had high emotions often led them to have higher ad recall. In fact, a survey of 3,500 Twitter users and non-users found that viewers were 48 percent more likely to recall an ad they saw the day before. "Not all TV audiences are created equal: we've long believed that viewers respond differently to commercials depending on how they feel about what they're watching," Heather O'Shea, Twitter's global agency research and data strategy lead, wrote in a blog post. "And when it comes to getting a pulse on people's emotional reactions during live TV, now we know that Twitter can drive even stronger results for brands." Based on the results, O'Shea offered three tips for marketers hoping to harness the double-screen world: 1.

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These Are the Oscar Ads and Moments Viewers Paid Attention to the Most

February 29, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It may not have won Best Original Song, but Lady Gaga's show-stopping performance of "Til It Happens to You" from The Hunting Ground documentary was the top moment during a politically charged Oscars Sunday night. According to TV measurement firm TVision, Gaga's rendition of her song about sexual abuse, which ended with numerous survivors joining Gaga on stage, scored the highest positive attention of any moment on Sunday. The performance, which came near the end of the roughly three-and-a-half-hour telecast, scored a 2.00 rating on TVision's Positive Attention Index, which combines the total amount of time viewers are watching the TV set with the number of times a viewer smiles per minute. Vice President Joe Biden's introduction of his "good friend" Gaga had the fourth highest score on the index with 1.47. TVision measures actual "eyes-on-screen" to provide advertisers, agencies and television networks the second-by-second data required to understand the effectiveness of television advertising and programming. The company uses computer vision technology to passively collect viewer behavior, attention and emotional affect second by second, person by person from the natural viewing environment. Kate Winslet and Reese Witherspoon introducing a pair of Best Picture nominees scored second-highest on the Positive Attention Index with 1.65, perhaps in part due to Winslet rocking a sweet pair of thick-rimmed eyeglasses, which got a lot of chatter on social media. Can we go back to talking about Kate Winslet's glasses? #Oscars pic.twitter.com/8Cnfo3wTvZ — TODAY (@TODAYshow) February 29, 2016 The other two moments to score the highest on TVision's Positive Attention Index were the Girl Scouts of Los Angeles, and Sasha Baron Coen bringing back his Ali G character. TVision also measured smiles and attention separately (smiles for moments during the show, attention for advertising). Not surprisingly, Leonardo DiCaprio winning his first Oscar after six nominations rated the highest on TVision's Smile Index with a 2.75, well above the next highest moment—Spotlight winning Best Picture (1.50). The other three were The Hateful Eight's Best Original Score win (1.47), the Minions' clip (1.26) and Sam Smith winning for Best Original Song (1.24). Cadillac's "Rewind Time" spot that aired during the 11 p.m. ET hour scored the highest on TVision's Attention Index with a 1.54. The following commercial from Kohl's ( one of four the retailer aired last night ) came in at No.

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HBO’s New Teaser Poster for Game of Thrones Has Fans Absolutely Freaking Out

November 23, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If you watched the most recent Game of Thrones finale, you're probably going to be a bit shocked to see the poster for next season. (I'm not really sure how to avoid potential spoilers here, so if you're not caught up on the series, you might want to go find something else to read about for a bit.) In the poster, Jon Snow's not looking great, but he's also not looking ... very dead. Since HBO's version of the series has now caught up with George R.R. Martin's books, even die-hard fans of the novels aren't sure what to expect from the next season, so this poster is quite a bold way to market the next season. Oh, and that season is five months away. So you've got plenty of time to wonder, theorize and throw around words like "skinchanger." Here are examples of the Twitter reactions you probably expected: APRIL. #GoTSeason6 #GameOfThrones pic.twitter.com/DSK2xZi9i9 — Game Of Thrones (@GameOfThrones) November 23, 2015 @GameOfThrones WHAT THIS MEAN — katniss loves peeta (@aIohakara) November 23, 2015 OMFGGGGGG JON DADDY @GameOfThrones — Red Lux (@RedLuxed) November 23, 2015 @GameOfThrones WHAT THE FUCK IS THIS — e ↠ | saw mj part 2 (@emmxgrace) November 23, 2015 @GameOfThrones @ImaginarySkye WHATWHATWHAT — methamphetamemes@MFF (@syrianbryn) November 23, 2015 @GameOfThrones WTF?! Or better, FTW (For the watch). — Giado Mastice (@freakazoid_1988) November 23, 2015 . @GameOfThrones cc.

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