Posts Tagged ‘time’

2013 U.S. Agency of the Year: 72andSunny

December 9, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The long wood table that 72andSunny partners John Boiler, Glenn Cole, Robert Nakata and Matt Jarvis share as a desk inside their Playa Vista, Calif., office says a lot about the agency and its recent success. You see, the desk is made of slats from the old floor of Pauley Pavilion, home court of UCLA’s basketball team, another perennial Southern California winner. This desk doesn’t symbolize winning, though—but rather, how you play the game. “One of our big inspirations is John Wooden,” explains Jarvis, the agency’s chief strategy officer, referring to UCLA’s legendary head coach. “He never talked about winning or losing—he talked about performing at the highest level you’re capable of. And so, that has been a huge influence on how we look at channeling our competitive spirit in a way that’s productive, long term and sustainable.” And though Wooden didn’t fixate on winning, he still won more than 80 percent of the games he coached—a fact that makes him an extraordinary and appropriate role model for an agency completing its most successful year ever. In 2013, 72andSunny not only expanded relationships with core clients Samsung and Target, but it also landed coveted slots on the creative rosters of world-class brands ESPN, Google and Starbucks. In addition, the shop dethroned JWT as lead global agency on Smirnoff , the biggest selling spirits brand in the world. In the process, U.S. revenue soared 81 percent to an estimated $85 million. Creatively, the MDC Partners shop with the quirky name took big swings, particularly with Samsung and Activision Publishing, producing high-profile ads that blended celebrities with brands in unexpected ways. One long-form Samsung ad captured Jay-Z in the studio with producer Rick Rubin working on Jay-Z’s latest release, Magna Carta Holy Grail —of which 1 million Galaxy owners got an exclusive early download. Another Samsung ad made great use of LeBron James in a warm family setting, with his wife using a Galaxy phone to film father and son at play. Finally, for Activision’s Call of Duty: Ghosts, 72andSunny partnered with Eminem , who supplied music for the game and a video that teased the November launch.

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Apple Hopes to Usher in New Age of Personalized In-Store Shopping With iBeacon Rollout

December 6, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

After months of speculation, Apple today rolled out its iBeacon technology in all of its 254 U.S. stores, allowing the company to send notifications to shoppers’ phones based on their location within the store. The technology, which sends data to phones via Bluetooth Low Energy from iPhones, iPads and other third-party hardware Apple has positioned around its stores, will initially be used to prompt shoppers who have installed the Apple Store app and agree to be tracked to take certain actions. For example, shoppers who have come to the store to pick up a device they ordered online may receive a push notification-like message indicating that the product is ready and to swipe to view the confirmation. Another implementation triggers a message to shoppers when they are near the store’s accessories department and will prompt them to read product reviews and pay with the app’s Easy Pay function, which lets shoppers scan a product’s bar code with their phone and pay from the app. “We’re really excited about what iOS developers will be able to do with iBeacon, a technology we introduced with iOS 7 that uses Bluetooth Low Energy and geofencing to provide apps a whole new level of micro-location awareness, such as trail markers in a park, exhibits in a museum, or product displays in stores,” Apple said in a statement. The messaging efforts used in this initial rollout are pretty straightforward. But you could imagine Apple rolling out increasingly sophisticated use cases as time goes on, perhaps ones that recommend purchases based on current products a user owns or on online shopping behavior. But, perhaps more importantly, Apple likely views its rollout as one giant demonstration for other retailers looking to harness the power of mobile phones to give shoppers more personalized in-store visits via their own apps, whether it be special offers if a shopper spends a certain amount of time in one corner of a shop or information about products. Similar technologies have been out there for some time, but Apple’s arrival in the space will likely speed up adoption. The startup NewAer, for example, has been working on a technology similar to iBeacon for quite some time that supports both Bluetooth and Wi-Fi and which it hopes to license to brands to use in their own apps. Its founder and CEO, Dave Mathews, said in an interview with AllThingsD in the fall that Apple’s entree will legitimize the space

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Siri Gets Serious, Microsoft Gets Its Mojo Back and Everything Gets Encrypted in 2014

December 6, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

If it’s December, it’s time to start predicting what’s going to dominate the headlines and trends of 2014. I make it a point every year to sit down with Mark Anderson, an industry analyst and CEO of Strategic News Service, and get an early look at the predictions he makes in a speech at an annual dinner at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York. As with previous rounds of predictions he has made (See 2011 , 2012 and 2013 ), some already make sense if you’ve been paying attention to the way things are going, and will become more pronounced in the year ahead. Others are a little more surprising. Siris head into silos. There will be more products like Apple’s Siri, and they’ll spread out and dive deep into vertical markets. Current voice-recognition products are sitting in the range of 60 percent to 80 percent accuracy, which is still too frustrating to be effective for daily use. “You still get a lot of Siri jokes,” Anderson says. “But as that rate approaches 90 percent and above, they’ll get more useful and start appearing in industry-specific products.” Customers will start trusting these systems more. Visualization goes mainstream. As more companies spin up efforts to harness the capabilities of big data and analytics, making the results more useful will become a higher priority. That’s going to bring a new emphasis on visualization tools. “Let’s stop talking about Big Data and start talking about seeing data. We haven’t yet had any big improvements in ways to help us use all this data we’re gathering.” Price rules consumer electronics

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Apple, China Mobile Sign Deal to Offer iPhone

December 5, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

China Mobile has signed a long-awaited deal with Apple to offer iPhones on its network, a person familiar with the situation said, an arrangement that would give the U.S. technology giant a big boost in the world’s largest mobile market. The rollout of iPhones on the world’s largest mobile carrier by users, with over 700 million subscribers, is expected to start later this month, around the time of a Dec. 18 China Mobile conference in Guangzhou, according to two people familiar with the carrier’s plans. Read the rest of this post on the original site

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While Mulally/Nadella Remain the Favorites, Bates Is Silicon Valley’s Choice for Microsoft CEO

November 29, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Tony Bates About 10 days ago, AllThingsD reported once again that Ford CEO Alan Mulally was in the lead position to take over as CEO of Microsoft, with one internal exec as the No. 2 choice. As I noted in a post on November 19 : “Ford CEO Alan Mulally remains in the pole position for the job, with the idea that he will be more a ‘caretaker’ type CEO, whose deep experience and inspirational charisma will get the company on the right path, while also training up a number of internal candidates to eventually take over from him. The top pick among the possible heirs inside for that princeling role: Enterprise chief Satya Nadella.” Bloomberg reported similarly that Mulally and Nadella were the two top candidates yesterday. In the story, it noted that the Microsoft talent search documents are calling for someone with an “extensive track record in managing complex, global organizations within a fast-paced and highly competitive market sector; track record of delivering top and bottom line results. Proven ability to lead a multi-billion dollar organization and large employee base.” Let’s be clear, none of this is new. ATD and others reported in September that Mulally was the leading name in the race to run the software giant. The Mulally/Nadella scenario is both intriguing and also makes basic sense, along with another newer scenario in which a board member — like Seagate’s CEO Stephen J. Luczo — becomes the CEO (inside the company, this is being jokingly called “pulling a Dick Cheney”). But more than a dozen tech leaders in Silicon Valley, as well as several top Microsoft execs, I have talked to over the last week have one single choice to lead the company: Tony Bates. Having the love of Silicon Valley, of course, is perhaps a little dicey for anyone from Microsoft, despite years of bridge-building done by many company execs, including the British-born Bates, after decades of hostility. But those I spoke to said Bates had all the right assets, making him “the best candidate across all of the various criteria,” said one source. “Tony is a bold choice that would say a lot to the rest of the tech world that Microsoft is ready to engage,” said another source close to the company. “Mulally makes sense only if the board wants a transitional figure, which means it basically doesn’t know what to do yet.” Among Bates’s pluses, according to these sources: Scale management experience from his time as an exec at Cisco, where he managed about 12,000 global workers and was responsible for more than $20 billion in revenue. Technical ability, although Bates does not have a technical degree (he dropped out of mechanical engineering program in Britain). But, at Cisco, he was in change of development of a complex networking product, and he also holds many patents related to the area.

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Facebook Testing Timehop-Like Feature to Surface Past News Feed Posts

November 29, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Grufnik/Flickr Facebook is getting the slightest bit more nostalgic. The company is trying out a new feature inside of the News Feed that lets users surface old Facebook posts from their Timeline. Facebook confirmed the new feature in a statement: “We’re testing a new way to help you remember favorite moments by making it easier to revisit previous News Feed posts,” a Facebook spokesperson told AllThingsD . “When you click on this notice, you will see a selection of some of the top posts from your News Feed from a year ago. This is just a small test at this stage.” The feature is much akin to startups like Timehop and the now-defunct Memolane , single-serving apps that connected to users’ various social media accounts and resurfaced status updates, tweets and photos from years past. I found Timehop in particular to be equal parts charming and embarrassing when looking back on what I had to say just a year or two ago. But as an app that served little purpose outside of digging up the past, it was difficult to see any direction in which it could evolve. I’ve also been suspect of how long people would keep an app devoted entirely to this purpose before deleting it from their phone.

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Apple Doesn’t Want to Pay the Feds’ E-Book Lawyer $70,000 a Week

November 29, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

As part of its punishment for the e-book antitrust trial it lost this summer , Apple is supposed to be footing the bill for a court-appointed “ compliance monitor .” Apple is not happy about this. At all. While it appeals the court’s ruling in the trial, Apple is now contesting the way that its monitor, former federal prosecutor Michael Bromwich, is going about his business. Among Apple’s complaints, filed in federal court this week: Bromwich is doing too much, by doing things like demanding interviews with Apple CEO Tim Cook, board member Al Gore, and Jony Ive (“whose sole and exclusive responsibility at Apple is to perfect elegant product designs,” according to an Apple attorney). Bromwich is charging too much — more than $1,100 an hour. Apple says this is “higher than Apple has ever encountered for any task.” Bromwich’s bill for his five-person team’s first two weeks of work: $138,432.40. Bromwich’s response, which he has sent to Apple and its attorneys as part of a lengthy back-and-forth over the past few weeks: You people seem to think I’m working for you. “Apple has sought for the last month to manage our relationship as though we are its outside counsel or consultant,” he wrote in a letter to Cook and his board last week. My fees are reasonable, and you have no idea what a reasonable fee looks like. Also, it doesn’t matter if you think my fees are reasonable, because you don’t get to negotiate them: You just pay them. The court will approve them

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AllThingsD Week In Review: AppSung 2, Internet Funneling and Inside Microsoft’s CEO Search

November 25, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

In case you missed anything, here’s a quick roundup of some of the news that powered AllThingsD this week: This week, Apple and Samsung were back in black … suits, for a partial retrial of last year’s patent infringement lawsuit. This time, though, the only thing that mattered this week was money , and how much of last year’s $1 billion verdict was improperly calculated. Apple said Samsung should pay $379 million in addition to an undisputed $640 million, while Samsung argued that $52 million was plenty . Ultimately, the jury decided Samsung owed $290 million for its patent infringement adding up to a total of $929.83 million between the two trials. The battle between the two companies, however, is far from over . Internet research firm Renesys disclosed this week that earlier this year, an unknown party targeted Internet carriers in major cities worldwide and performed what’s called a “Man-In-The-Middle attack,” funneling Internet traffic bound for those cities through Belarus and Iceland. Arik Hesseldahl explained the reported attack in detail here. Ding! Southwest Airlines is upping the ante in the electronics-on-planes game, tapping its satellite internet infrastructure to offer gate-to-gate Wi-Fi Internet . The ever-falling cost and size of computing power caused Intel to get beaten at its own game , chairman Andy Bryant said on Thursday. Bryant said the company “lost [its] way” but that there’s still reason to be hopeful looking forward. Who will take over the reins at Microsoft once its current CEO Steve Ballmer departs? High-ranking insiders say it might be Ford CEO Alan Mulally , to be a “caretaker” of the job while training others who might eventually take his place. There’s still time, though, for a dark horse to emerge. Sony’s last gaming console, the PlayStation 3, was sold at a loss, but its new PlayStation 4 is being built for $381, or $18 under its retail price, according to research firm IHS. Here are the details from IHS’ teardown. Apple is trying to acquire 3-D sensing company PrimeSense , but as of Sunday, talks were “close” but not yet done. Sources said its reported valuation of $345 million would would not represent a huge win for investors. ( Update : Oh look — sold! ) Amazon is in the process of creating its own brand for supermarket goods , according to several job listings the company has posted over the last few months.

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Five Questions About Basketball, Tech and Kickstarter for Vantage Sports’ Cameron Tangney

November 23, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

You could call it the Bill James effect. Or maybe sports technophiles such as Mark Cuban deserve the credit. Whatever you call it, more and more professional sports teams are utilizing technology in day-to-day operations. The kind of advanced statistical analysis that revolutionized baseball and pushed the term “Moneyball” into the mainstream has spread into other professional sports in recent years. Last year, half the teams in the National Basketball Association used SportVU cameras in their arenas to log every movement on the court to track the positioning of players to better assess specific plays and situations. This year, all 30 teams in the NBA will have the $100,000 cameras, as Grantland’s Zach Lowe reported earlier this year. That means the information gap between fans and professional sports teams is shrinking fast. A recently launched Kickstarter project wants to further bridge the gap. Vantage Sports’ latest project, ProScout , hopes to track 16,000 different data points per game, with the goal of producing more complete, contextual insight. Fans would be able to follow specific players or teams for $1-$3 per player, per month, although the final cost has not yet been set. (A model player page featuring Steph Curry of the Golden State Warriors can be found here .) Cameron Tangney, Chief Technology Officer at Vantage Sports and a former Googler, spoke to AllThingsD about the project and the future of technology and sports.

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