Posts Tagged ‘time’

Yada, Yada, Yada: Seinfeld Reunion in the Works

January 30, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Jerry Seinfeld on Thursday confirmed that he and Larry David are working on a one-off Seinfeld reunion and that the finished product will be released “very, very soon.” Speaking to the hosts of the Boomer & Carton show on WFAN, the comic fielded a number of queries about a Jan. 13 photo in which he and Jason Alexander were seen walking outside Tom’s Restaurant on 112th and Broadway. The diner was used for establishing shots throughout Seinfeld’s NBC run. While he wasn’t entirely forthcoming, Seinfeld did drop a few hints about what he and his old confreres have been up to. He specifically said that the filming wasn’t related to a Super Bowl spot or an episode of his Crackle series Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee . “It’s neither,” Seinfeld said. “But it’s not not those things either. It’s a secret project.” Seinfeld went on to reveal that other characters from the powerhouse sitcom were involved in the project, although he wouldn’t identify a studio or a distributor. When asked if Alexander was surprised to be asked to reprise his role of the “short, stocky, slow-witted bald man” George Costanza , Seinfeld chuckled to himself. “Was Jason surprised? No, he remembers that he played that character for nine years,” he cracked. “He was not surprised that he was asked to play George.” After the fifth question, the comic joked that his interlocutor was “really Mike Wallace-ing me here.” He added that the finished project is “a short-ish form” effort, noting that its running time is longer than 60 seconds. Whatever form the finished product takes, it’s probably a one-shot deal. In any event, Seinfeld fans should keep their eyes peeled, as the project will be released “very, very soon.” In addition to the Tom’s Restaurant exteriors, the shoot spread out to other locations. Jerry’s Upper West Side apartment was not one of them; in all likelihood, the Studio City set was dismantled shortly after the series wrapped in May 1998. Seinfeld first dropped hints that he was working with David on Jan. 6, during a Reddit “Ask Me Anything” session . “We wrote this script for this thing that you will eventually see but I can’t reveal what it is at this time,” Seinfeld said during the online Q&A. “All I can do is tell you is that it’s big, huge, gigantic.” At its peak, Seinfeld averaged 34.1 million viewers and a staggering 18.0 in the dollar demo in NBC’s Thursday 9 p.m. time slot

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Fox Sports’ Erin Andrews Discusses Her Dream Come True of Covering the Super Bowl

January 27, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who Erin Andrews Age 35 New gig Sunday marks Andrews’ first stint as a Super Bowl sideline reporter. Continuing gig Fox Sports reporter and studio host, Fox College Saturday ( FS1 ) How does the Super Bowl stack up to every other event you’ve covered over the course of your career? It’s really one of the biggest reasons I wanted to go to Fox. This is a bucket list thing for me. I mean, it’s the Super Bowl—what’s bigger and better than that? How would you characterize your role for fans who don’t see the value in a sideline reporter? Well, there are a lot of people who think, “Oh, there’s no need for them, they’re just glorified gurney chasers.” And if that’s the case, I say, why not come on down and give it a try, and see how much work goes into it! In many ways, it’s like being a spy. I’m privy to conversations that [Fox analysts] Joe [Buck] and Troy [Aikman] aren’t, and it’s my job to convey some of that information back to the booth and to the people watching at home

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The Following Star Kevin Bacon Stays Close to His N.Y. Roots

January 17, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who Kevin Bacon Age 55 Accomplishments Stars as Ryan Hardy on Fox’s The Following ( Season 2 preview airs Sunday, Jan. 19 after the NFC Championship Game); Golden Globe Award-winning actor; musician Base New York and Los Angeles What’s the first information you consume in the morning? I read The New York Times app or website. I like the regular dot-com better because the app is almost too homogenized. But there are certain things about the app that I also like, so I toggle back and forth between the two. And if I’m in New York, I will also be listening to the morning show on NY1 , which I love. There’s just something about Pat Kiernan. He’s kind of hilarious. What are your go-to social platforms? For social media, I use something called WhoSay . It’s more photo-centric, and it lets me simultaneously post to Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and some Chinese sites. Where do you get your news? My main news source is the PBS NewsHour.

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The ‘Internet of Things’ Heralds the Arrival of the Jetsons Age

January 6, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

What smartphones and apps have done to connect people to the Internet wherever they go, emerging new technologies will soon connect seemingly every other object in your life (even the most nonelectronic in nature) to the Web. It’s a weird phrase you’ll hear a lot this year: the Internet of Things. These “Things” aren’t new. They’re mundane devices—lights, garage doors, toasters and other household appliances—all tricked out with sensors and wired into semi-autonomous algorithms. It’s all designed to give consumers more control, make their lives easier, give them more information—in short, to borrow from a famous slogan, to bring ordinary things to life. Or, to go a little darker, it’s like Skynet from the Terminator movies right before it turns on humankind. Take your pick. At last year’s International Consumer Electronics Show, attendees witnessed a coming-out party for the Internet of Things. Many of those things, including watches or sports aids like a golf tee to help you with your swing, did one thing really well. But those devices didn’t talk to each other. This year, because they are starting to share information, they’ll do more than just one cute trick. Three emerging technologies will lend the IOT its intelligence: sensors that can track temperature, movement or speed; systems that integrate the control of devices; and a shared syntax that lets them talk to each other. Think of thermostats that turn down the heat after everyone has left the house; smart calendars that tell you to leave for that important meeting right now because traffic is bad; a refrigerator that updates your online grocery order when your milk has reached its expiration date or your lettuce is wilted; apps that adjust your prescription dosage based on diet and exercise for the week; or the robotic vacuum cleaner that activates after the 20th person has walked through the door. Once the devices can talk to each other through the Internet, the consumer won’t have to push a button to make something happen because the devices will anticipate what you want. Yes, we are headed to a Jetsons kind of future.

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What You Need to Know About Online Gift-Card Exchanges

December 30, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Chances are you received at least one gift card this week. According to the National Retail Federation, gift-card spending this holiday season was expected to reach an all-time high. Eighty percent of consumers said they planned to buy these oh-so-personal pieces of plastic. But, as we all know, gift cards often go unspent — or half-spent, with a nominal balance left on them for all of retail eternity. So if you’d rather turn them in for cash or another brand-name gift card, this column might help you out. What follows are some possible questions about how online gift-card exchanges work.

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CIOs Brand Enterprise Social Tools as Most Overhyped Technology of the Year

December 30, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

It’s the end of the year, and that means a plethora of stories and lists with a lot of hyperbolic words like “hottest” or “greatest” in the headline rendering some kind of judgment on the prior 12 months. Usually I tend to avoid these stories because there are too many of them . But I was attracted to this one in part because of its balance of the cynical and the not-cynical, and by the source of the survey data: The CIOs of large corporations. It comes by way of Sierra Ventures, the enterprise-focused venture capital firm based in Palo Alto, Calif. For years that firm has maintained a network of about 70 CIOs at some of the world’s biggest companies, and has routinely sought their input on their needs from directly in the corporate IT trenches. Sierra has in turn allowed that advice to help guide its investment decisions and how it helps its portfolio companies grow. Recently it held its annual CIO Summit, and the time came to ask about 40 of those CIOs what was on their minds. The result was a simple survey with one key question: What were the most overhyped and underhyped technologies being hawked to large enterprises during the year? The answers were pretty clear and, at least in the overhyped category, close to unanimous. The most overhyped, in their view, were social tools aimed at the enterprise. This would include products like Jive, Microsoft’s Yammer, Salesforce.com’s Chatter, Moxie, VMWare’s Socialcast and a host of others. Their reasoning, as Al Campa, a partner at Sierra Ventures put it, was equally simple: “They don’t feel there’s any evidence for a return on investment or ROI,” he said. “It just didn’t move the needle for them when compared to other technologies they looked at.” It’s a kind of predictable answer where CIOs are concerned, but not chief marketing officers, or CMOs, said Tim Guleri, a managing partner at Sierra Ventures. “CIOs are all about controlling spending and driving down their costs and finding money to fund innovation elsewhere,” he said.

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NBC Ends Fall With Dominant Weekly Performance in Demos

December 24, 2013  |  Variety  |  No Comments

NBC closed out a strong fall last week with another victory in key demos, this time blowing away the competish behind “Sunday Night Football” and the cycle finale of “The Voice.” The Peacock also got solid perfs from limited-run series “The Sing-Off” and kept the lights on with encores of holiday faves like “SNL Christmas”... Read more

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The One Big Question About RSA and Its Relationship With the NSA

December 24, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Last week, the Internet security world was jolted by a Reuters report detailing a secret $10 million payment to the security company RSA from the National Security Agency. The source of the information, Reuters said, came from new documents from former NSA contractor Edward Snowden. The point of the payment, according to the report, was to help the NSA boost the adoption of a formula it had created for generating random numbers, which was then inserted as the default option on RSA security products. The result would essentially amount to the creation of a “back door,” giving the NSA the ability to decrypt Internet traffic that had been encrypted using a product known as BSafe. On Sunday, RSA, a division of storage and IT giant EMC best known for its widely used security tokens, denied the report in a corporate blog post. It said that it has worked with the NSA for years and has never kept the relationship a secret, doing so with the intent of strengthening security products used in both the government and private sectors. But its explanation is incomplete — RSA’s statement has been attacked by many — and leaves many questions. Among them is one big one that hangs above all the others: What did RSA know about the algorithm that was ultimately found to contain the “back door,” and, perhaps more importantly, if it did have some idea, why did it say nothing about it for six years? The problematic formula is known as Dual EC DRBG, which stands for Dual Elliptic Curve Deterministic Random Bit Generator . Generating a random number is a crucial function in encrypting communications on the Internet. RSA included the software libraries for using it in BSafe products beginning in 2004. At the time, the method was on its way to being approved by the U.S.

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All Things Walt: Mossberg’s Top Dozen Picks Over 20 Years of Reviewing Tech (Video)

December 23, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Here’s the tech reviewer Walt Mossberg talking on CNBC about his top picks for the last two decades he has written about the arena. Mossberg names Apple products as the biggest influencer over this time, although in his last column for The Wall Street Journal after more than 20 years of reviewing, he also mentions Microsoft’s Windows 95, Google Search and Twitter. Although he is leaving the WSJ on December 31 — and this site too, since it is owned by News Corp. — there is much more to come at the start of 2014. You can read a bit about that here in this Mashable exit interview , where Mossberg talks about his work over the last 20 years and more. Here’s the best part, his advice for young journalists just starting out, which never really changes: “I would tell them quality over quantity, which is one of the biggest sins on the Web, particularly today.

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In Wake of Card Data Breach, Target’s Redcard Website Has Been Down All Day

December 20, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

When Target this morning acknowledged a security breach of data from up to 40 million credit and debit cards used in its stores over a two-week period beginning around Thanksgiving, it told its shoppers to monitor their accounts for fishy transactions. But if the card you’ve used in a Target store recently is one of Target’s very own debit or credit cards, dubbed Redcards, you’re out of luck for now. The Redcard website has essentially been down all day. I tried to log in for the first time around 11 am ET, but the site wouldn’t load. More than nine hours later, at the time of this writing, the site is still down. The phone line has been down all day as well.

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