Posts Tagged ‘time’

What’s Causing Vice’s Huge Fluctuations in Web Traffic?

April 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Ever since Vice decided to get into the cable TV game, the self-assured digital news and lifestyle publisher has been under the microscope. That came blaringly to the fore last month when Variety reported that Vice's web traffic plunged in February. But after free-falling 17.4 percent, from 59.5 million unique visitors in January to 49.2 in February, Vice rebounded nearly all the way back in March, drawing 58.3 million uniques. So what caused Vice's huge fall—and subsequent Phoenix-like rise—the past two months? Ironically, it was smaller sites that Vice bundles with its own traffic in an effort to boost its overall numbers for sales purposes.

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This Media Network Is Taking Its Storytelling Directly to Advertisers

April 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As a young man, digital media executive JuanMa Rowland suffered a debilitating head injury. Though he didn't know it at the time, that traumatic event opened up a world of opportunity. It allowed him to recognize patterns and, he says, tell stories with more precision. Now fully recovered, Rowland, as Azteca's StoryMaker—that's his job title—is turning adversity into advertising. Through the Azteca GlassWorks content studio, Rowland and his team of 10 creators and futurists will "tell very local, very direct stories that brands want to talk about. ... It's a completely different approach of how the upfronts work," Rowland said.

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How It Feels to Go Viral, Then Watch Your Content Get Stolen All Over the Internet

April 4, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On a Tuesday morning in December, I uploaded my late-night talk show's 449th video to YouTube, then went about my day. By the afternoon, I was thinking this one—a mockumentary called "Instagram Husband" created for our Springfield, Missouri-based show, The Mystery Hour —might be different. The next day, when it hit 1 million views, I knew it was different. And by the time the next week rolled around, I didn't know which way was up anymore. When I came up with the idea for "Instagram Husband," I had a vague sense it had the chance to go viral, because when I shared the idea with people they enthusiastically related. I thought people I know would share it, the team that helped create it would share it, fans of my show would share it, and it would be a nice little feather in the cap. I never would have guessed just how big it would become. It's hard to accurately describe the feeling of going viral for the first time. The best I can come up with is that it's like you're dropped into the ocean with stray planks of wood, nails and a hammer. As you're frantically treading water, you're also trying to figure out how to build your boat at the same time. I'm proud that we built The Mystery Hour slowly from underground hit, to television, to syndication with good, live crowds—all in Springfield. The operative word here is "slowly." We slowly built things in a nice stair-step fashion. Then, with one video, I was getting calls and emails from press around the world and from people in the entertainment industry in New York and Los Angeles

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NBCUniversal Will Combine Its Cable, NBC and Telemundo Upfront Presentations

March 30, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The broadcast upfront week just got a lot more interesting—and a little bit shorter. NBCUniversal has decided to merge its NBC, Telemundo and NBCU cable entertainment upfronts into a single NBCU presentation, which will be held on Monday, May 16 at New York's Radio City Music Hall. The news was first reported by The Hollywood Reporter . Traditionally, NBC has had the Monday Radio City upfront to itself, with Telemundo following on Tuesday evening, and NBCU cable wrapping upfront week with a Thursday afternoon event at the Javits Center. Now, Linda Yaccarino, chairman, advertising sales and client partnerships for NBCUniversal, will make just one upfront pitch to advertisers and buyers that week instead of three separate ones. "As a media company, we have an unparalleled array of networks and digital platforms that reach the most audiences across all dayparts. Our event will reflect the way we go to market as a unified portfolio which makes it easier for our clients to do business with us all together," said Yaccarino said in a statement. "There isn't going to be an upfront event as big and bold as this one. Through our content, we have an unrivaled ability to create an emotional connection like no one else. There's only one place to go for scale and meaningful consumer engagement." In many ways, it's a move that makes sense for NBCU, which has been transacting all of its advertising under a single, companywide portfolio since 2013. Last year's upfront brought in $6 billion across the portfolio. Last November, Yaccarino continued streamlining NBCU ad sales by merging her linear and digital ad sales teams . "Because of the scale of our company, we needed to be more accessible in a bigger, faster way to our clients," who had been requesting a more streamlined method of working with the company, she told Adweek at the time. This will also mark the end of NBCU's combined cable upfront, which the network had added to broadcast upfront week in 2014. Previously, it held individual upfronts for its cable networks like Bravo, USA and Oxygen. Advertisers and buyers will certainly appreciate having two fewer upfronts to attend during that overstuffed week, especially because so many of them have run out of steam by the time they arrive at NBCU's cable presentation on Thursday afternoon. But that Monday upfront—which will now cover Bravo, CNBC, E!, Esquire Network, Golf Channel, MSNBC, NBC Entertainment, NBC News, NBC Sports Network, NBC Universo, Oxygen, Sprout, Syfy, Telemundo and USA—could easily turn into a marathon, as each of those broadcast and cable networks will get their due. Plus, Yaccarino will also need to highlight her team's new initiatives, including selling TV advertising programmatically for the first time this fall . The new format also puts NBC at a disadvantage compared to its fellow broadcast networks, which won't need to share the spotlight as much, if at all, during their respective upfronts later that week. It's also unlikely that the combined upfront will allow for spectacles like NBC Entertainment chairman Bob Greenblatt's duet with Dolly Parton , which was a memorable, surreal highlight of last year's NBC presentation.

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State Farm Is Being Featured in Tonight’s Episode of Black-ish

March 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Faced with declining overnight ratings and the myriad ways viewers can avoid ads, some brands are beginning to master the art of product placement, and networks are reaping the rewards. Last season, ABC's hit comedy Modern Family produced an episode shot entirely with Apple products. But that integration—in an episode called "Connection Lost"—was not a paid placement. Tonight, another ABC sitcom incorporates a well-known brand into its storyline, but this time, it gets something in return. On Black-ish, advertising executive Dre Johnson (played by Anthony Anderson) persuades his client, State Farm Insurance, to sponsor his son's basketball team, the "State Farm Good Neighbors." The integration, created in partnership with Omnicom agency The Marketing Arm, fits with State Farm's already sizeable footprint in basketball—it's a brand partner of the NCAA, NBA and WNBA.

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Film Review: ‘The Divergent Series: Allegiant’

March 6, 2016  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Gazing out over the wall that encircles Chicago at the end of “The Divergent Series: Allegiant,” Tris Prior longs for the time when she didn’t know what lay on the other side.

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Real Housewives’ Lisa Rinna Dishes on Yolanda and Brandi, With a Chaser of O.J.

February 24, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Age 52 Claim to fame Star of Bravo's The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills Base Los Angeles Twitter @l isarinna Adweek: What's the first information you consume in the morning? Lisa Rinna: I wake up and I get the kids ready for school, and I turn on the local NBC news or CNN. I read the New York Post and then I go to the Daily Mail. Then I will check Instagram. I no longer check Twitter because I hire somebody to do that. It's become so negative while I'm doing the show. Like your recent Twitter war with ex-Housewife Brandi Glanville

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To Keep Children Engaged During Prime Time, PBS Will Launch a 24/7 Kids Network

February 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Viewers might have wondered if PBS was rethinking its commitment to children's programming after it allowed HBO to snap up Sesame Street last summer. But today the network announced a big play to keep kids watching its shows around the clock. Later this year, the network will launch a free, 24-hour network for children's programming called PBS Kids. This will let children watch during prime time and other hours when PBS doesn't air kid-centric content. The channel will be available as a digital subchannel on PBS stations nationwide (joining other PBS digital subchannels like Create and World). The network will also stream it online at pbskids.org and via the PBS Kids Video app, which is available on iOS and Android devices, as well as Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, Chromecast, Android TV and Xbox One. The livestream will join the on-demand full episodes and clips that are currently available on the app and online. PBS will continue to air its PBS Kids programming blocks on the primary network during the morning and afternoon. "Parents know that PBS Kids makes a difference in their children's lives, which is why so many have said they would value having access to our content throughout the day. Television continues to be the most widely used platform for children's educational content, especially among low-income families," said Paula Kerger, PBS president and CEO, in a statement.

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Philippe Dauman Named Executive Chairman of Viacom, As Sumner Redstone Steps Down

February 4, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just 48 hours ago, Sumner Redstone was the executive chairman of both CBS Corp. and Viacom. But now, he has been replaced at both companies. Today, Viacom announced that its president and CEO Philippe Dauman had been named executive chairman, replacing the ailing Redstone, who is 92. Yesterday, CBS Corp. appointed Les Moonves as its chairman , after Redstone had resigned on Feb. 2. Redstone, who vowed never to retire (even going as far to declare that he would never die ), is now chairman emeritus at both companies. The news comes two weeks after Viacom and CBS were sued by a shareholder , who questioned Redstone's mental competence—which led investors to wonder whether Redstone should continue running both companies. "In choosing a successor to Sumner, the board considered the need for seasoned leadership in this time of unprecedented change, Philippe's business experience and unparalleled knowledge of Viacom and his long-term vision for the company," said Viacom board member William Schwartz in a statement. "We believe his becoming executive chairman is in the best interests of the company and all shareholders." Dauman's appointment had been challenged by Redstone's daughter, Shari, who is vice chair of CBS and Viacom. She said in a statement yesterday that while she fully supported Moonves as CBS chairman, "it is my firm belief that whoever may succeed my father as chair at each company should be someone who is not a trustee of my father's trust or otherwise intertwined in Redstone family matters, but rather a leader with an independent voice." That was a slap at Dauman, who was given authority last October to make healthcare decisions for Redstone if he should become incapacitated. Following CBS' lead yesterday, Viacom had initially offered Shari the position of non-executive chairman, but she declined and will remain in her current role. "I am honored to succeed my friend and long-time colleague Sumner in the role of executive chairman. His steadfast belief in our company and the power of entertainment will always be an inspiration for me and I look forward to carrying forward his leadership role as a champion for all shareholders.

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The X-Files Tackles Its Toughest Case Yet: Reviving TV Revivals

January 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Last fall, the broadcast networks bet that the best way to attract viewers was by programming reboots and revivals of popular series and movies. However, Limitless, Minority Report, The Muppets and Heroes Reborn had limited success at reigniting that spark with audiences. Limitless is a hit for CBS. But Fox's Minority Report and NBC's Heroes Reborn won't be returning for Season 2, and ABC is retooling The Muppets in an attempt to win back viewers who were driven away by its more adult tone. Last August, NBC scrapped its straight-to-series revival of '90s sitcom Coach after shooting just one episode. That's because some networks are bringing brands out of mothballs for all the wrong reasons. "I think reboots are a dangerous thing

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