Posts Tagged ‘time’

Why This Shop Is Breaking the Traditional Agency Model by Developing Its Own Gin

October 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Red Tettemer O'Connell + Partners thinks it's found the perfect way to revive a gin brand created in 2008, a brand that the agency developed from scratch to better understand its clients and just do something outside of the normal creative work. RTO+P launched a new fall line of its gin product, with a new look and of course, a new taste, to draw in some new, younger gin drinkers. TuB first came onto the scene in 2008, created as a partnership between the agency and Peach Street Distillers, but the agency continues to put resources into the project because "it allows us to further break the traditional agency model by becoming involved in the whole cycle of marketing, from product development to promotion to experience to distribution," Steve Red, chief creative officer at RTO+P, said. From the beginning RTO+P has worked on all sides of the product from branding and packaging to marketing strategies and responsibilities, helping place past iterations of the product in the LA, New York and Chicago markets. "That kind of immersive experience makes us better at what we do," Red added. The latest line marks the brand's first special edition line. It's called Hoppy Plum and is made with juniper berries Palisade plums and Palisade Chinook Hops, perfect for the holiday season.

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BBC America Teases 2 New Shows (and the Return of Doctor Who) at New York Comic-Con

October 7, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

What's one huge lesson Sarah Barnett, president of BBC America, has learned from events like Comic-Con? "Be superfans of your fans!" That's the approach BBC America brought to this year's New York Comic-Con, where it took over Madison Square Garden, with panels and mini-screeners for conventiongoers, as the first TV network to expand its presentation into that massive theater. Comic-Con, which also takes place in San Diego every year, is a place where fans come first. TV shows and networks combine with high-profile movies and comic books to create a whirlwind of fandom. "This is one of the most pop-culture literate groups of people," said Barnett. "They know their stuff. And there's an openness to good ideas and content

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Here Are the TV Shows and Networks People Watch Live Most and Least Often

October 7, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

While broadcast viewers are thought to represent a more traditional TV audience than those watching cable, a new report says they are actually less likely to watch programming live than their cable counterparts, especially if the network in question is The CW. That information comes from TiVo Research's Q2 State of TV report, which was released today. The quarterly report tracks time-shifting using TiVo's Media TRAnalytics data set, which anonymously aggregates set-top box data from more than 2.3 million households including TiVo owners and other cable providers. According to the study, while the vast majority of TV viewing continues to be live, broadcast network prime-time viewing is more likely to be time-shifted than cable programming. Twenty-six percent of broadcast prime-time programming was time-shifted during the second quarter (23 percent overall was watched in the C3 window, from the same day to three days later; the other 3 percent was time-shifted four to seven days). In total day viewing, 20 percent of broadcast programing was time-shifted. For cable prime-time viewing during the quarter, 88 percent was viewed live, with total day viewing even higher at 91 percent. The CW is the most time-shifted of the broadcast networks. Only 56 percent of its viewers watch live in prime time.

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Why the Peanuts Gang Is Surging in Popularity After So Many Years

October 4, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

There's an ambitious gal running for president who was never satisfied with the idea of being first lady. She's sharp, decisive and, by her own admission, "a little bossy." She looks forward to bursting through the glass ceiling at the White House. Do you know her name? It's Lucy van Pelt. The advice-dispensing Peanuts character may not seem like such an outrageous choice for the nation's highest office right about now. Or there's her football-fumbling frenemy, Charlie Brown, or his streetwise dog, Snoopy, also known as Joe Cool. The point is: You have options, people. For a partnership with Rock the Vote, the Peanuts characters are staging their own mock elections, complete with campaign platforms

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Clio Lifetime Achievement Award Winner Wants to See More Diversity in the Industry

September 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Current gig President, Kaplan Thaler Productions Previous gig Chairman, Publicis Kaplan Thaler Twitter @lindathaler2 You're being honored with a Clio Lifetime Achievement Award this year. Do you remember winning your first Clio? I don't remember the first Clio I won, but I do remember the year I won four. One, I wrote the music and lyrics for "Kodak America," then French's mustard won two. I won for best comedy writing and then we won for a Burger King commercial. I was fairly young at the time and hadn't been in the ad business very long, so I was really thrilled. It was incredible. After stepping down as chairman of Publicis Kaplan Thaler early this year, what have you been working on? I had been doing public speaking for several years off and on, but I decided to leave advertising this past February and be a speaker full time across the country, talking about a variety of topics. I love it because it's a combination of me being able to give stories and insights and empowerment to people as well as my theatrical desires because I never quite gave up wanting to perform. That's what I did in my 20s. I got to combine the two things and I love it. What does your latest book, Grit to Great , tackle? Robin Koval and I started The Kaplan Thaler Group about 20 years ago, and we are very proud of what we have accomplished. Along the way we decided to write books. Most recently we started looking at our success and realizing that neither of us are geniuses or incredibly talented, and we started researching really uber-successful people

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How Play-Doh Went From Being a Household Cleaning Supply to a Beloved Toy

September 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Joseph McVicker was in big trouble. Kutol Products, his Cincinnati company, manufactured a gummy, doughy product that housewives used to remove coal soot from wallpaper. But now it was 1955. Not only were vinyl wallpapers coming onto the market, but homes were switching from coal stoves to oil and natural gas that burned cleaner. Kutol was fast becoming obsolete. Play-Doh lion crafted by Emily Shellenberger; Prop stying and lettering: Dianna McDougall; Photo: Raquel Beauchamp That might have been the end of it for McVicker were it not for his sister-in-law Kay who happened to be a nursery school teacher

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Chuck Todd on Why Donald Trump Probably Won’t Skip the Presidential Debates

September 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The longest-running show on American television is having a moment, once again. NBC's Meet the Press is beginning its new season with a formula that hasn't changed much since it debuted on Nov. 6, 1947: A moderator interviews a newsmaker, usually a politician or candidate, followed by a discussion of the top political and policy issues of the day. These days the moderator is Chuck Todd, a political wonk who got his start in politics briefly working for the 1992 presidential campaign of Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa). "Basically, I was the runner to go to the bank to deposit checks," he explained. After 15 years at National Journal's The Hotline, including six as editor in chief, the late Tim Russert recruited Todd to NBC as political director.

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What Google Learned From the Digital Diaries of 1,000 Mobile Users

September 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

There's that old saying about how it takes walking a mile in someone else's shoes to know them. But for Google, all it takes is a week of tracking a person's digital and physical footsteps. In one of its most comprehensive studies yet for how people benefit from mobile devices, Google asked 1,000 users to take a survey several times a day for a week to help the company better understand their needs throughout the day and how a smartphone helped them. The results, released today, provided more than 14,000 responses that helped illustrate when people want to know something, buy something, watch something or do something. The results are good news for Google, which now receives more than half of its search traffic from mobile devices. It also now gives the company more evidence for pitching mobile-first advertising campaigns for both marketers to drive online sales, mobile application installs and offline visits. According to Google, 92 percent of respondents who did research on their phone made a purchase within a day, and 76 percent of those searching for something nearby visited a related business within a day. (Back in May, Google said mobile shopping searches had gone up 30 percent in the past year.) "What we found in this diary setting is what we've been seeing over the last few years," said Lisa Gevelber, Google's vp of marketing. "This shift to mobile is not just a shift in biases—it's a dramatic shift in consumer behavior and in expectations." According to Google, smartphones were the most popular type of device for addressing daily needs. In fact, 96 percent said they used their phone, while just 33 percent used a tablet and 73 percent used a laptop. (Exactly half said they used more than one device.) Most people said they used their phone the most because it was the closest device or easiest device at any given time.

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Time Inc. Enters Streaming Space With Launch of People/Entertainment Weekly Network

September 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With everyone from ESPN to Turner set to launch new over-the-top networks, the OTT video space is getting more crowded with every passing day. But that's not stopping Time Inc., the publisher of storied titles like Time and Sports Illustrated, from entering the fray. This Monday, the company is officially launching the People/Entertainment Weekly Network, a new ad-supported long-form video-on-demand network (AVOD) that purports to be the first solely pop culture- and celebrity-focused entry in the category. First announced at Time Inc.'s NewFronts presentation in May, the network—PEN for short—marks a major investment for the 94-year-old media company, which has spent the past several years aggressively expanding its digital and video businesses in an effort to combat the industrywide problem of declining print ad sales. "If you look at the subscription business, there are a lot of niche brands that have recently launched, but if you look at the straight AVOD business, it's definitely an interesting area," said Bruce Gersh, svp of brand business development. "These two brands coming together as the first blue-chip brands entering the ad-supported OTT space is a really great opportunity for us." Of course, there's already plenty of other similar celebrity- and Hollywood-themed content at consumers' fingertips on every platform. But Time Inc. is betting that the People and EW names—and their combined cross-platform audience of more than 108 million, according to the MPA—will set its offerings apart.

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Ad of the Day: A Dangerous Disco Ball Ends Up With the Perfect People, Thanks to Letgo

August 17, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

We've all been guilty of going to great lengths to hang on to items with sentimental value, but a new ad for marketplace app Letgo reminds us there's always a better home out there. The spot, "Disco Ball," from Crispin Porter + Bogusky Miami, keeps up the app's marketing approach of creating ads in the style of big-budget Hollywood action films (see below in case you missed the earlier spots). This time around, the director is Craig Gillespie, best known for 2007's Lars and the Real Girl and 2011's reboot of Fright Night. While the previous ads took place mostly in one location, this time we watch as two women weave through epic car crashes—likely of their own creation—while debating the merits of keeping a massive disco ball. Luckily, the right group of friends comes along to help.

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