Posts Tagged ‘time’

After Conquering Reality TV, Kim Kardashian Is Taking the Mobile World By Storm

March 2, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Kim Kardashian West first grabbed our attention in October 2007 with the premiere of E!'s Keeping Up With the Kardashians. Who could have guessed where that basic-cable reality show moment would lead? Since then, Kim, 34, has entered that rare pantheon of mononymous celebrities. Like Madonna and Oprah, Pel

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‘Fifty Shades’ Star Jamie Dornan on the Time He Drunk Auditioned for ‘Rock of Ages’

February 17, 2015  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Jamie Dornan is now a bonafide box office star, thanks to “Fifty Shades of Grey,” but the 32-year-old actor spent a stretch of his 20s in Los Angeles trying to make it as an actor. During a two-hour interview with Variety in January, he talked about some of his early experiences, his worst audition ever... Read more

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Jon Cryer on Two and a Half Men’s ‘Absolutely Crazy’ Series Finale

February 16, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When he landed the role of Alan Harper on CBS' Two and a Half Men in 2003, Jon Cryer says he had "an unusual sense of confidence" that the show would break his streak of four failed TV series. It did a lot more than that, of course. After 12 hit seasons, Two and a Half Men closes shop on Feb. 19, going down in history as television's longest-running multicamera comedy. Shortly after shooting the final episode, the actor spoke with Adweek about the shrouded-in-secrecy, "absolutely crazy" final episode, the Charlie Sheen chapter and how Ashton Kutcher stepped in and revitalized the show, and what's up next. Adweek: What was filming the finale like? Cryer: It was very emotional for everybody. The writers had a huge challenge because they had to basically end two shows and somehow weave them together. And they seized upon a very meta concept and really ran with it. So it's unlike any show we ever did before—and frankly, unlike any series finale I've seen. The title of the final episode, "Of Course He's Dead," seems to tease the return of Charlie Sheen. Does he come back

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How to Score a Media Gig

February 11, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Know thyself, said the ancient Greeks. Cheri Eisen, Fusion's head of human resources, thinks that advice is on the nose, even though Socrates and Plato weren't talking about wading into 2015's ultracompetitive job market. Eisen has a number of tips for job seekers ahead of Feb. 11's Mediabistro Job Fair in New York. Among her recommendations: Never pick up a call while in an interview and do tidy that Facebook page (no beer bongs, please). Fusion, a partnership between Disney/ABC and Univision, will participate in the sold-out event alongside media giants like AOL, CBS, Cond

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Jon Stewart Is Leaving The Daily Show

February 11, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Jon Stewart is leaving Comedy Central's The Daily Show. It's a little hard to fathom, frankly. Stewart is as familiar among young consumers of news as any of the broadcast anchors—probably more so in many cases—and his brand of media criticism has changed the face of the journalism industry over the course of the last 16 years. And now he's going away.

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Netflix Is Now Officially Streaming in Cuba

February 9, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Here's hoping House of Cards has a Havana episode next season. Netflix today is officially welcoming its first subscribers in Cuba.

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Key and Peele Spoof Odd Football-Player Names Just in Time for the Super Bowl

January 28, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Well, it was inevitable: Key & Peele has yet another skit about inventively named (and coifed!) college football players, and they've taken the opportunity of the upcoming Super Bowl to promote it. And rather than simply featuring the comedians sporting a series of ridiculous wigs and accents, Comedy Central has tapped honest-to-God football players to fill in some of the spots. The pantheon of fabulous names so far has included such gridiron luminaries as "Donkey Teeth" and "X-Wing @aliciousness," so the two have their work cut out for them this time around. Will the nation's supply of absurd names run dry before the end of the sketch? (Spoiler: No. No, it will not.) Key & Peele, Drunk History and Inside Amy Schumer are probably Comedy Central's highest-profile successes from several years of commissioning and airing sketch comedy at an incredible rate—for a while it accounted for almost everything on the network in primetime. Now the pendulum is swinging back toward full-blown scripted half-hours, such as Review (one of our best shows of the year ) and the upcoming Duty (recently ordered to pilot ). Key and Peele give the actual football players some of the less auspicious monikers in the bit below... wait, no, there's an actual player named Ha Ha Clinton-Dix , and all the others! The effect is very funny indeed. Check out the new promo and the last two editions under that. The show's third season premieres Friday, Jan. 30, at 10 p.m.

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ESPN’s Music Focus: How Athletes and Artists Are Learning From Each Other

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In recent years, ESPN's music focus has come to rival that of MTV. The cable network uses songs from diverse artists to bolster its sports coverage—and makes music a regular feature of its glossy magazine to entice readers and ad dollars. ESPN The Magazine's third "Music Issue" dropped last Friday, once

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Why the Super Bowl Halftime Show Has Become the Best Ad of All

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For brands that know the score, music and sports can be a winning combination—and nowhere more than the Super Bowl halftime show, the height of music, sports and culture on the world's ultimate stage. "They're a natural pairing," says Angela Natividad, international account director at social agency Darewin. "Sports and music are both highly emotional and moment oriented," she adds, and their union can help advertisers reach consumers in meaningful and memorable ways. "They align themselves extremely well," says Joe DiMuro, president of Frukt North America, a unit of sports and entertainment agency Octagon, and can work in tandem to "expand the ability of a brand to have relevancy," notably among millennials. "Music and sports are the key to youth passion," adds Omar Johnson, CMO of Beats by Dr. Dre. Brands that successfully fuse the two stand to "keep up with the speed of culture." Leveraging the music-sports nexus goes beyond booking bands to play at athletic events or licensing songs for ads. Today, savvy marketers are creating compelling live experiences matched with powerful campaigns. They're "generating an aesthetic and culture," says author and entertainment expert Patricia Martin

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Why the Super Bowl Halftime Show Has Become the Biggest Ad of All

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For brands that know the score, music and sports can be a winning combination—and nowhere more than the Super Bowl halftime show, the height of music, sports and pop culture on the world's ultimate stage. "They're a natural pairing," says Angela Natividad, international account director at social agency Darewin. "Sports and music are both highly emotional and moment oriented," she adds, and their union can help advertisers reach consumers in meaningful and memorable ways. "They align themselves extremely well," says Joe DiMuro, president of Frukt North America, a unit of sports and entertainment agency Octagon, and can work in tandem to "expand the ability of a brand to have relevancy," notably among millennials. "Music and sports are the key to youth passion," adds Omar Johnson, CMO of Beats by Dr. Dre. Brands that successfully fuse the two stand to "keep up with the speed of culture." Leveraging the music-sports nexus goes beyond booking bands to play at athletic events or licensing songs for ads. Today, savvy marketers are creating compelling live experiences matched with powerful campaigns. They're "generating an aesthetic and culture," says author and entertainment expert Patricia Martin. Ultimately, it's a lifestyle play, with advertisers seeking more vibrant roles in areas where consumers forge and reinforce their identities. The most notable music-sports integration of the year will ignite screens across the planet on Feb. 1, when pop princess Katy Perry takes the halftime stage during Super Bowl XLIX. Her glitzy, 12-minute set, sponsored by PepsiCo, will be broadcast by NBC to a television audience expected to exceed 110 million in the U.S. alone.

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