Posts Tagged ‘time’

How Play-Doh Went From Being a Household Cleaning Supply to a Beloved Toy

September 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Joseph McVicker was in big trouble. Kutol Products, his Cincinnati company, manufactured a gummy, doughy product that housewives used to remove coal soot from wallpaper. But now it was 1955. Not only were vinyl wallpapers coming onto the market, but homes were switching from coal stoves to oil and natural gas that burned cleaner. Kutol was fast becoming obsolete. Play-Doh lion crafted by Emily Shellenberger; Prop stying and lettering: Dianna McDougall; Photo: Raquel Beauchamp That might have been the end of it for McVicker were it not for his sister-in-law Kay who happened to be a nursery school teacher

Read More

Chuck Todd on Why Donald Trump Probably Won’t Skip the Presidential Debates

September 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The longest-running show on American television is having a moment, once again. NBC's Meet the Press is beginning its new season with a formula that hasn't changed much since it debuted on Nov. 6, 1947: A moderator interviews a newsmaker, usually a politician or candidate, followed by a discussion of the top political and policy issues of the day. These days the moderator is Chuck Todd, a political wonk who got his start in politics briefly working for the 1992 presidential campaign of Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa). "Basically, I was the runner to go to the bank to deposit checks," he explained. After 15 years at National Journal's The Hotline, including six as editor in chief, the late Tim Russert recruited Todd to NBC as political director.

Read More

What Google Learned From the Digital Diaries of 1,000 Mobile Users

September 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

There's that old saying about how it takes walking a mile in someone else's shoes to know them. But for Google, all it takes is a week of tracking a person's digital and physical footsteps. In one of its most comprehensive studies yet for how people benefit from mobile devices, Google asked 1,000 users to take a survey several times a day for a week to help the company better understand their needs throughout the day and how a smartphone helped them. The results, released today, provided more than 14,000 responses that helped illustrate when people want to know something, buy something, watch something or do something. The results are good news for Google, which now receives more than half of its search traffic from mobile devices. It also now gives the company more evidence for pitching mobile-first advertising campaigns for both marketers to drive online sales, mobile application installs and offline visits. According to Google, 92 percent of respondents who did research on their phone made a purchase within a day, and 76 percent of those searching for something nearby visited a related business within a day. (Back in May, Google said mobile shopping searches had gone up 30 percent in the past year.) "What we found in this diary setting is what we've been seeing over the last few years," said Lisa Gevelber, Google's vp of marketing. "This shift to mobile is not just a shift in biases—it's a dramatic shift in consumer behavior and in expectations." According to Google, smartphones were the most popular type of device for addressing daily needs. In fact, 96 percent said they used their phone, while just 33 percent used a tablet and 73 percent used a laptop. (Exactly half said they used more than one device.) Most people said they used their phone the most because it was the closest device or easiest device at any given time.

Read More

Time Inc. Enters Streaming Space With Launch of People/Entertainment Weekly Network

September 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With everyone from ESPN to Turner set to launch new over-the-top networks, the OTT video space is getting more crowded with every passing day. But that's not stopping Time Inc., the publisher of storied titles like Time and Sports Illustrated, from entering the fray. This Monday, the company is officially launching the People/Entertainment Weekly Network, a new ad-supported long-form video-on-demand network (AVOD) that purports to be the first solely pop culture- and celebrity-focused entry in the category. First announced at Time Inc.'s NewFronts presentation in May, the network—PEN for short—marks a major investment for the 94-year-old media company, which has spent the past several years aggressively expanding its digital and video businesses in an effort to combat the industrywide problem of declining print ad sales. "If you look at the subscription business, there are a lot of niche brands that have recently launched, but if you look at the straight AVOD business, it's definitely an interesting area," said Bruce Gersh, svp of brand business development. "These two brands coming together as the first blue-chip brands entering the ad-supported OTT space is a really great opportunity for us." Of course, there's already plenty of other similar celebrity- and Hollywood-themed content at consumers' fingertips on every platform. But Time Inc. is betting that the People and EW names—and their combined cross-platform audience of more than 108 million, according to the MPA—will set its offerings apart.

Read More

Ad of the Day: A Dangerous Disco Ball Ends Up With the Perfect People, Thanks to Letgo

August 17, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

We've all been guilty of going to great lengths to hang on to items with sentimental value, but a new ad for marketplace app Letgo reminds us there's always a better home out there. The spot, "Disco Ball," from Crispin Porter + Bogusky Miami, keeps up the app's marketing approach of creating ads in the style of big-budget Hollywood action films (see below in case you missed the earlier spots). This time around, the director is Craig Gillespie, best known for 2007's Lars and the Real Girl and 2011's reboot of Fright Night. While the previous ads took place mostly in one location, this time we watch as two women weave through epic car crashes—likely of their own creation—while debating the merits of keeping a massive disco ball. Luckily, the right group of friends comes along to help.

Read More

Olympic Roundup: Michael Phelps ‘Not Coming Back in 4 Years’

August 13, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Friday Michael Phelps put an end to any speculation that he will return to the Olympic games in four years, and Katie Ledecky smashed her own world record for the 800-meter freestyle. The U.S. remained on top of the medal count (now 50) again on Friday. Here's what marketers need to know about the last 24 hours of the Olympics: Michael Phelps on Olympic Future: 'I Am Not Coming Back in Four Years' Ryan Lochte speculated that competitor Michael Phelps will be returning to the pool at the Olympic games in four years. However, Phelps himself confirmed that he is in fact retiring. (USA Today) Here's the total medal leaderboard as it stood going into Saturday, according to NBC Olympics: Leaderboard United States: 50 China: 37 Japan: 24 Great Britain: 22 Russia: 22 Ledecky Defends 800-Meter Free Title, Crushes Her Own World Record Michael Phelps isn't the only swimmer who made news at the Olympics on Friday

Read More

It’s Official: Roger Ailes Resigns From Fox News Amid Sexual Harassment Allegations

July 21, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After a flurry of bizarre reports earlier this week, confirmed then quickly denied, about Roger Ailes' exit from Fox News, it's now official: The chairman and CEO is departing the top-ranked cable news network he co-founded in 1996. Ailes has resigned, effective immediately, 21st Century Fox announced. Rupert Murdoch, executive chairman of 21st Century Fox, will take over as chairman and acting CEO of Fox News and Fox Business Network. "Roger Ailes has made a remarkable contribution to our company and our country. Roger shared my vision of a great and independent television organization and executed it brilliantly over 20 great years," said Murdoch in a statement. "I am personally committed to ensuring that Fox News remains a distinctive, powerful voice

Read More

Why This Agency Created an Ad-Free, Niche Cooking Magazine

July 8, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

A new magazine hit newsstands this week—a niche cooking magazine called Sous-Vide—and the team behind it might surprise you. The cover of Sous-Vide's debut issue. While the concept for the magazine came from company Cuisine Solutions, 95 percent of the content created for it was composed by creative agency HZDG's content studio. Yes, an advertising agency is behind a new glossy magazine that also happens to be ad-free. "There's a whole new sector of publishing bubbling up within the media landscape, there are a whole new stable of magazines that are focused on enthusiast audiences and hyper-niche subject matter," Sarah Schaffer, head of the HZDG Content Studio, said. "People are changing the way content is produced and consumed, so I don't think [producing an ad-free magazine] was that shocking to us." Selling for $9.99 at stores including Whole Foods, Costco and Trader Joe's, the magazine will publish twice a year for the time being. The magazine is meant to be a "cuisine solutions publication," for chefs and foodies across the country.

Read More

Visit Houston Uses VR to Help Bust the City’s ‘Tumbleweeds and Cattle’ Stereotypes

July 7, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Houston is the fourth largest city in the U.S., and one of the most diverse, yet it's still not a hugely popular tourist destination. "We still have to dispel beliefs that Houston is where the tumbleweeds and cattle are," said Mike Waterman, president of Visit Houston, the city's convention and visitors bureau. To do that, Visit Houston is launching a virtual reality experience that puts potential visitors at the center of the action. The experience, created with VR company YouVisit, will give viewers a 360-degree view of Houston's attractions such as the NASA Space Center, Minute Maid Park, the Houston Ballet and the city's museums and parks. It includes a tour guide avatar that offers brief explanations about each destination. "We're trying to provide new visitors with experiences that are memorable, and therefore marketable," Waterman said. "We sat down and thought about the 12 most interesting venues that would entice people to watch the content. The hope is that once people see the content, they'll be so excited that they'll book a ticket to Houston." People spend an average of 10 minutes watching YouVisit's VR pieces, which have also included experiences for Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week Russia and Alaska and Vietnam tourism. "In the online world, 10 minutes is an eternity," said Abi Mandelbaum, CEO of YouVisit. "For travel destinations, when you're able to put that perspective traveler in a VR set and give them a glimpse of what it would be like to be there, their desire to experience it in real life jumps dramatically." YouVisit also tracks viewer data, which will help Visit Houston inform its future marketing efforts based on how many people are watching, where they're located, and which destinations are grabbing their attention, Mandelbaum added. "It lets the data do the talking. You look at what they're spending their time on, and then continue to enhance the experience and marketing message to hone in on things they're interested in," he said. "That informs the messaging that the destination can use to continue to attract more visitors and drive better results." The VR experience should help Visit Houston reach its goal of 20 million visitors by 2018, an increase from 14.9 million in 2014 and 17.5 million in 2015, Waterman said. "When we go into a NASA buoyancy lab and capture astronauts training, or we film the Houston Ballet during the rehearsal, or the signing of the National Anthem at Minute Maid Park during an Astros game, that's content that people will want to watch. If we produce the right kind of content, people will want to consume it." Mandelbaum expects more tourism organizations to embrace virtual reality in their marketing efforts in the future. "It's an experience that you can't get from Trip Advisor or Yelp," he said. "When you can get a traveler to feel what it's like to actually be there, it changes the game and moves your destination to the top of the list because you've offered them something memorable."

Read More

Chicken With a Beef: the Untold Story of Chick-fil-A’s Cow Campaign

June 17, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Stan Richards, founder and creative director of ad agency The Richards Group, was sitting in a routine staff meeting in 1994 when he learned his agency won the Chick-fil-A account. He didn't find out in an email. No phone call came in breaking the good news. Instead, David Salyers—then vp of national and regional marketing at Chick-fil-A—ventured from Atlanta to the agency's Dallas headquarters on a whim. Salyers arrived, unannounced, and boldly walked into the meeting. He stopped whatever conversation was taking place and shook Richards' hand. "We want you to be our new agency," he said with a smile. In that moment, Salyers made a promise to Richards that the agency said still rings true today: "We will never be your biggest client, but we will do everything we can do to be your best client." And, Richards tells Adweek, "that's exactly what they've done over all those years." The underdog chicken In the early '90s, Chick-fil-A was primarily known for being a mall-based fast-food chain, but beginning in 1994, the chain started slowly shifting its focus to freestanding units. With that shift came a new batch of competitors—big burger joints.

Read More