Posts Tagged ‘time’

Marketers Will Be Tempted to Dial Back Their Diversity Under Trump. We Can’t Let Them

January 16, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

"Frankly, I have yet to engage in a direct action campaign that was 'well timed' in the view of those who have not suffered unduly from the disease of segregation. For years now I have heard the word 'Wait!' It rings in the ear of every Negro with piercing familiarity. This 'Wait' has almost always meant 'Never.'" Edward Bowser Those words were penned by the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. on scraps of paper nearly 54 years ago while he sat in a jail here in my home city of Birmingham, Alabama. Sadly, those same words could have been typed on a blog last week and still be just as relevant. Today, we celebrate the legacy of a man whose work has become the embodiment of racial harmony and inclusion. In four days, we will witness the induction of a president whose campaign was steeped in division and exclusion. Call it a dream deferred. As President-Elect Donald Trump's rise to power ran parallel with the nation's growing civil unrest, pundits quickly invoked MLK's name whenever they were shaken from their comfort zones

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Gus Fring Was Behind That Clever Los Pollos Hermanos Ad for Better Call Saul

January 15, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When AMC's Breaking Bad prequel Better Call Saul returns for Season 3 on April 10, the show will feature another familiar face from Breaking Bad: ruthless drug lord Gus Fring, played by Giancarlo Esposito. AMC teased Esposito's appearance last week by releasing a clever ad for Los Pollos Hermanos—the fictional fast-food fried chicken chain that Fring operates as a drug front—featuring Fring himself, which caused Breaking Bad fans to lose their minds. Esposito confirmed his return at the Television Critics Association's winter press tour in Pasadena, Calif., when he appeared in character as Fring during AMC's panel for Better Call Saul, and handed out boxes of Los Pollos Hermanos chicken to reporters. The actor told Adweek that he came up with the idea for last week's pitch-perfect Los Pollos Hermanos spot himself. It's been gestating for years, Esposito said, since he first appeared on Breaking Bad in 2009. "I always say it was divinely guided, because it came out of a meditation. I always knew from the time I first started working at Pollos Hermanos that there might be some juice in doing something that was centered in the restaurant, that was commercial-like," said Esposito. "But when I thought of it earlier on, with Breaking Bad, it just didn't fit" with that show's dramatic tone. The idea resurfaced again as he began filming Better Call Saul. "It came back to me two or three weeks ago, and I thought, this is the perfect way to tease a Gus Fring return. Because this show has some comedy in it. It's a little funnier than Breaking Bad was," said Esposito. But still, the actor hesitated to share his vision with the show's co-creators Vince Gilligan (who also created Breaking Bad) and Peter Gould. "We're dealing with Sony [which produces Saul] and Vince Gilligan, who's a genius, and AMC, and I thought, 'Will they ever accept that idea? And then I thought, it doesn't matter whether they do or not, it came to you; put it out there!' So I did, and I even guided them as to what it might look like." Gilligan and Gould were on board. "We loved it, and fortunately, AMC decided to make it," said Gould. "We just sat back and enjoyed it." Added Gilligan, "I thought that was brilliant.

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As a Producer, Bryan Cranston Knew the Best Way to Save His Pilot Sneaky Pete Was to Act In It Himself

January 12, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When his iconic TV series Breaking Bad went off the air in 2013, Bryan Cranston wasn't looking to dive back into another series role. But in May 2015, when CBS passed on Sneaky Pete, the drama pilot he had co-created, co-written and executive produced, Cranston knew there was one surefire way to help the show find a second life: hire himself as an actor on the show. His instinct paid off: Amazon (and its viewers) loved the retooled pilot— significantly improved by the addition of a riveting scene with Cranston in the closing moments—and gave the show a series order. The full season, one of this year's most anticipated shows, debuts on the streaming service Friday, with Cranston appearing in all 10 episodes (he also directs an episode). Sneaky Pete stars Giovanni Ribisi as Marius, a con man who has just been released after three years in prison, where his cell mate, Pete, talked incessantly about his idyllic childhood. On the run from Cranston's Vince, Marius decides to assume Pete's identity and hide out with his family (including Margo Martindale as his grandmother), who run a struggling bail bonds business, and haven't seen Pete in 20 years. The tension escalates after Vince tracks down Marius, and threatens to remove one of his brother's fingers each week until Marius repays his debt. Cranston told Adweek that Sneaky Pete refers to his family nickname growing up. "I was raised in a lower income household, with a fractured family: I didn't have a father in my life when I was 11 to when I was an adult, and my mother become an alcoholic," he said. "What happens is you start to self-parent, and you're making mistake after mistake and just weaving your way through, looking for shortcuts," Cranston said. "So my family was even calling me Sneaky Pete: a guy who was looking for shortcuts. A guy who was circumventing responsibility and striving for mediocrity. That's fine when you're in that condition, but at some point, something has to break." It did for Cranston in his early 20s, when he embarked on a two-year motorcycle trip and realized he wanted to be an actor. When he accepted his fourth and final acting Emmy for Breaking Bad in 2014, Cranston dedicated his award to "all the Sneaky Petes out there." The day after the Emmys, Cranston received a congratulatory phone call from Sony Pictures Television co-president Zack Van Amburg: "He says, 'I think there's a series there: Sneaky Pete.' I said, 'What's the series?" And he goes, 'I don't know! But I do know this'—and he left me with this little nugget—'What happens if you didn't mature and change when you were 20 years old

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How Waterford Keeps the Final 10 Seconds of Each Year Fresh With the New Year’s Eve Ball

December 28, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Pop quiz: What media event guarantees the most eyeballs for a brand? The Super Bowl, right? Not a bad guess. Each year, some 114 million Americans (give or take) tune in to watch the football game and, of course, commercials for the brands that buy up the pricey ad time. But there's one event that beats those numbers. And it, too, is about a ball. But this one isn't a pigskin that gets tossed around; it's a 6-ton sphere that's 12 feet in diameter. And the furthest this ball travels is to the top of a flagpole. Follow us on Instagram We speak, of course, of the New Year's Eve Ball atop 1 Times Square in New York. When the famous illuminated ball drops during the final 10 seconds of the year, an estimated 175 million Americans—1 billion people around the world—are watching on TV or the web. As Times Square Alliance president Tim Tompkins put it, "There's no other time I can think of where [that many] Americans are doing the same thing." And while the Super Bowl sells commercial slots for some 67 brands, the New Year's ball drop highlights only one: Waterford. Since 2000, the Irish brand of lead crystal has manufactured the 2,688 glass triangles that, once screwed into place, complete the famous Times Square ball (actually a geodesic sphere.) That coveted job arguably makes Waterford—makers of fine stemware since 1783—the most visible brand on planet earth, at least for the last few moments of every year, when all eyes are trained on that big ball. "We love what we do," said Tom Brennan, master artisan for Waterford. "And we love the fact that a billion people around the world are watching." Brennan was speaking with reporters on the 21st floor of One Times Square on Tuesday morning, a few minutes before Waterford debuted its latest ball, which was waiting up on the roof. As it turns out, sponsoring the New Year's ball isn't just a coveted marketing opportunity, it's also a challenging one. After all, Waterford's name appears nowhere on the ball itself, and no viewers (either on TV or 470 feet below in Times Square) will get close enough to admire the detail on the glass, either.

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The Trump Phenomenon Delivered Massive Ratings for Cable News Throughout

November 9, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Say what you want about the outcome, but the 2016 presidential election cycle was unlike any the news media has ever experienced. As you might expect, cable news reaped significant benefits from the volatility of the race in the form of huge ratings. Fox News beat CNN in total audience on election night 2016 during the full coverage block, from 7 p.m. to 3 a.m. Per Nielsen data, FNC delivered 12.2 million viewers compared to CNN's 11.2 million. Fox News' viewership climbed on an hourly basis through midnight, while both CNN and MSNBC peaked at around 10 p.m. The ratings trends seem make sense considering now President-elect Donald Trump gained momentum as the night went on, while Hillary Clinton steadily lost steam. Fox News also beat CNN in the all-important 2-3 a.m. time period, when the race was called.

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The Trump Phenomenon Delivered Massive Ratings for Cable News Throughout

November 9, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Say what you want about the outcome, but the 2016 presidential election cycle was unlike any the news media has ever experienced. As you might expect, cable news reaped significant benefits from the volatility of the race in the form of huge ratings. Fox News beat CNN in total audience on election night 2016 during the full coverage block, from 7 p.m. to 3 a.m. Per Nielsen data, FNC delivered 12.2 million viewers compared to CNN's 11.2 million. Fox News' viewership climbed on an hourly basis through midnight, while both CNN and MSNBC peaked at around 10 p.m. The ratings trends seem make sense considering now President-elect Donald Trump gained momentum as the night went on, while Hillary Clinton steadily lost steam. Fox News also beat CNN in the all-important 2-3 a.m. time period, when the race was called. CNN did make some ratings history in prime time, as 13.3 million total viewers tuned into the network's Election Night in America coverage

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Last Year’s Biggest Freshman TV Hits Have Lost Momentum in Season 2

November 3, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For a new TV series, the only thing harder than becoming a freshman hit is maintaining that momentum in Season 2. Several of last year's biggest critical and commercial hits, including Blindspot and Mr. Robot, have been felled by ratings and creative challenges in their sophomore seasons. Two of last fall's biggest success stories, NBC's Blindspot and ABC's Quantico, were hoping to grow their audiences in Season 2, but instead they've stumbled out of the gate. Blindspot, which averaged a 1.8 in the 18-49 demo last year, is off 30 percent, averaging a 1.3. However, much of that ratings drop can be explained by NBC relocating Blindpsot from its cushy post-Voice time slot on Mondays to Wednesdays at 8 p.m., when the network is much more vulnerable (and when the show is being trounced by another action-heavy series, Fox's Lethal Weapon). Quantico's fall is more alarming. It remained in the same time slot as last year (10 p.m. Sundays), but the series, which averaged a 1.2 in the demo last season, is off 33 percent with a 0.8. Last season's most promising freshman series for ABC is now the network's lowest-rated scripted series in the demo—though the network notes that it's had significant gains in delayed viewing

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Why Agencies Should Spend More Time and Effort Retaining Their Strategy People

October 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The ad industry is losing more talent than it's gaining, according to a LinkedIn study—"The Truth About Strategy Talent"—done in partnership with the 4A's. In 2015, the ad industry experienced a 25 percent net loss of global talent to competing industries, but one area where agencies need to focus a bit more time is the strategy department. According to LinkedIn's data, strategic planners are 30 percent less likely to be satisfied with their current positions. Of those polled for the study, 28 percent said they don't see themselves working in their current positions within the next year and 40 percent see themselves out in less than six months. Additionally, 92 percent said they would be interested in learning about a new job opportunity, while 43 percent are more likely to respond to messages from recruiters about new opportunities, compared to the average agency person. "I think first and foremost that because planners tend to be very curious individuals, the fact that they are so much more likely to respond to a recruiter is not surprising but interesting because I think because they are curious by nature they are more likely to be open to talking to anybody about anything," Nancy Hill, president of the 4A's, said. In comparison to agency talent, strategy people are more likely to look for new job opportunities when they are overlooked for a promotion or when they feel they aren't challenged enough at their current job. "We have to stop looking at strategy people like all they are there to do is inform the brief. They can have so much more of an impact on the clients' business," argued 4A's president Nancy Hill. Added Jann Schwarz, global director of agency and channel development, LinkedIn Marketing Solutions: "The research suggests that, in addition to salary, lack of challenging work and overlooked promotions are key blockers to retaining strategy professionals. Agencies must better align with the underlying factors that motivate employees to stay and make adjustments accordingly." Schwarz noted that these factors are easily addressable, agencies simply need to take the time to address them. The good news is that, according to the data, strategy people don't necessarily want to leave the industry altogether. Compared to other agency talent, strategy talent is 35 percent more likely to look for promotions within the current company. Rather than switching industries, strategy people tend to look at competitive agencies for promotions. LinkedIn collected data for the study through a number of global professional studies including its "Job Switchers" survey and "Talent Trends" survey, as well as LinkedIn data on member behavior as of February 2016. This particular survey marks the first time LinkedIn has done a deep dive into strategy professionals in the advertising industry, and compares those individuals against the rest of the ad business and other industries.

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Netflix Debuts Haters Back Off, a New Original Series From YouTube Star Miranda Sings

October 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

"Miranda thinks she's incredible," said Colleen Ballinger, the creator of Miranda Sings. "She takes pride in her singing, dancing, acting, modeling... all of which she's not good at!" Nine years ago, when YouTube was essentially still a toddler, the character of Miranda Sings was born. Back then, Ballinger was studying vocal performance and had started to observe the girls around her. "I saw all these mean, snooty girls in my classes," she said, "so Miranda is really based on those girls. She was a way for me to poke fun at them." "She's very confident in her lack of talent," said Ballinger. Miranda, whose signature look is a red lip and a bad attitude, started as a much more tame version than what you see today. "When the first videos came out, and started to become viral, I started getting hate comments," she explained. "People would write 'you suck,' 'you're ugly,' 'you can't sing.' I became fascinated that people were so bored, they'd write something so mean about someone who wasn't even real." If they didn't like her singing, she'd sing worse. If they didn't like her style, she dressed worse. Ballinger really wanted to exaggerate Miranda's worst qualities so they would comment even more. She wanted to "engage with the haters." Miranda Sings currently has more than seven million subscribers on YouTube .

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Why This Shop Is Breaking the Traditional Agency Model by Developing Its Own Gin

October 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Red Tettemer O'Connell + Partners thinks it's found the perfect way to revive a gin brand created in 2008, a brand that the agency developed from scratch to better understand its clients and just do something outside of the normal creative work. RTO+P launched a new fall line of its gin product, with a new look and of course, a new taste, to draw in some new, younger gin drinkers. TuB first came onto the scene in 2008, created as a partnership between the agency and Peach Street Distillers, but the agency continues to put resources into the project because "it allows us to further break the traditional agency model by becoming involved in the whole cycle of marketing, from product development to promotion to experience to distribution," Steve Red, chief creative officer at RTO+P, said. From the beginning RTO+P has worked on all sides of the product from branding and packaging to marketing strategies and responsibilities, helping place past iterations of the product in the LA, New York and Chicago markets. "That kind of immersive experience makes us better at what we do," Red added. The latest line marks the brand's first special edition line. It's called Hoppy Plum and is made with juniper berries Palisade plums and Palisade Chinook Hops, perfect for the holiday season.

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