Posts Tagged ‘television’

The Most Threatening Thing to the Advertising World

March 17, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Advertising is under attack in Washington on a number of fronts. It’s accused of making kids fat, taking away our privacy, even making it easier for the government to spy on us.

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Brands Are Really Jumping On the Upcoming Muppets Movie Release

March 17, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It’s hard to predict how Disney’s Muppets Most Wanted will fare at the box office in its opening weekend, but the run-up to Friday’s nationwide launch has been nothing short of a brandapalooza. In the past six weeks, Toyota, Subway and Lipton have all rolled out ads featuring Kermit and the gang, beginning with a Toyota Highlander spot in the Feb. 2 Super Bowl. The co-branding efforts have extended online as well with videos and tons of social media support. And why not? Disney, after all, is an aggressive marketer, and if brands are willing to fund such pushes, the more the merrier, right? Still, some of these marriages work better than others, even if all help sell the movie. Two branding experts—Landor Associates’ Allen Adamson and Redscout’s Daniel Wadia—channel Siskel & Ebert to critique the spots.

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City of Los Angeles Files $10 Million Suit Against Time Warner Cable

March 14, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The city of Los Angeles is suing Time Warner Cable for nearly $10 million in allegedly unpaid franchise fees, a backlog that stretches back to 2010. In a complaint filed Friday with the United States District Court for the Central District of California, city attorney Mike Feuer charged Time Warner Cable with bilking the municipality to the tune of $9.7 million, a sum that includes $7.19 million in unpaid 2010 and 2011 franchise fees and another $2.51 million in delinquent payments from the previous two years. “Time Warner Cable has derived billions of dollars from its cable television franchise in the city of Los Angeles, yet stubbornly continues to flout its statutory obligations to compensate the city … fully for this privilege,” the complaint reads, before going on to note that the cable operator generates “more than $1 billion in revenue every two years from the residents of Los Angeles, a sum dwarfing the fees it is required to pay the city in return.” The city’s attorneys said that the unpaid franchise fees and Public, Educational, Government use fees represent millions that could be put to use to pay firefighter and police officer salaries and maintain parks and libraries. While the charges in the suit are characteristically byzantine, the city’s central argument would appear to boil down to the “precipitous and wrongful withholding” of contractually owed monies. Feuer’s office seems particularly enraged by the fact that the operator underpaid by as much as $5.22 million at the end of the city’s 2010-11 financial year, which only served to “exacerbate the City’s well-publicized fiscal crisis.” The defendants cited in the 24-page complaint are Time Warner Cable, Inc., Time Warner Cable Pacific West, Time Warner Cable Enterprises and the Time Warner Entertainment Advance/Newhouse Partnership.

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City of Los Angeles Files $10 Million Suit Against Time Warner Cable

March 14, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The city of Los Angeles is suing Time Warner Cable for nearly $10 million in allegedly unpaid franchise fees, a backlog that stretches back to 2010. In a complaint filed Friday with the United States District Court for the Central District of California, city attorney Mike Feuer charged Time Warner Cable with bilking the municipality to the tune of $9.7 million, a sum that includes $7.19 million in unpaid 2010 and 2011 franchise fees and another $2.51 million in delinquent payments from the previous two years. “Time Warner Cable has derived billions of dollars from its cable television franchise in the city of Los Angeles, yet stubbornly continues to flout its statutory obligations to compensate the city … fully for this privilege,” the complaint reads, before going on to note that the cable operator generates “more than $1 billion in revenue every two years from the residents of Los Angeles, a sum dwarfing the fees it is required to pay the city in return.” The city’s attorneys said that the unpaid franchise fees and Public, Educational, Government use fees represent millions that could be put to use to pay firefighter and police officer salaries and maintain parks and libraries. While the charges in the suit are characteristically byzantine, the city’s central argument would appear to boil down to the “precipitous and wrongful withholding” of contractually owed monies. Feuer’s office seems particularly enraged by the fact that the operator underpaid by as much as $5.22 million at the end of the city’s 2010-11 financial year, which only served to “exacerbate the City’s well-publicized fiscal crisis.” The defendants cited in the 24-page complaint are Time Warner Cable, Inc., Time Warner Cable Pacific West, Time Warner Cable Enterprises and the Time Warner Entertainment Advance/Newhouse Partnership.

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City of Los Angeles Files $10 Million Suit Against Time Warner Cable

March 14, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The city of Los Angeles is suing Time Warner Cable for nearly $10 million in allegedly unpaid franchise fees, a backlog that stretches back to 2010. In a complaint filed Friday with the United States District Court for the Central District of California, city attorney Mike Feuer charged Time Warner Cable with bilking the municipality to the tune of $9.7 million, a sum that includes $7.19 million in unpaid 2010 and 2011 franchise fees and another $2.51 million in delinquent payments from the previous two years. “Time Warner Cable has derived billions of dollars from its cable television franchise in the city of Los Angeles, yet stubbornly continues to flout its statutory obligations to compensate the city … fully for this privilege,” the complaint reads, before going on to note that the cable operator generates “more than $1 billion in revenue every two years from the residents of Los Angeles, a sum dwarfing the fees it is required to pay the city in return.” The city’s attorneys said that the unpaid franchise fees and Public, Educational, Government use fees represent millions that could be put to use to pay firefighter and police officer salaries and maintain parks and libraries. While the charges in the suit are characteristically byzantine, the city’s central argument would appear to boil down to the “precipitous and wrongful withholding” of contractually owed monies. Feuer’s office seems particularly enraged by the fact that the operator underpaid by as much as $5.22 million at the end of the city’s 2010-11 financial year, which only served to “exacerbate the City’s well-publicized fiscal crisis.” The defendants cited in the 24-page complaint are Time Warner Cable, Inc., Time Warner Cable Pacific West, Time Warner Cable Enterprises and the Time Warner Entertainment Advance/Newhouse Partnership.

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City of Los Angeles Files $10 Million Suit Against Time Warner Cable

March 14, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The city of Los Angeles is suing Time Warner Cable for nearly $10 million in allegedly unpaid franchise fees, a backlog that stretches back to 2010. In a complaint filed Friday with the United States District Court for the Central District of California, city attorney Mike Feuer charged Time Warner Cable with bilking the municipality to the tune of $9.7 million, a sum that includes $7.19 million in unpaid 2010 and 2011 franchise fees and another $2.51 million in delinquent payments from the previous two years. “Time Warner Cable has derived billions of dollars from its cable television franchise in the city of Los Angeles, yet stubbornly continues to flout its statutory obligations to compensate the city … fully for this privilege,” the complaint reads, before going on to note that the cable operator generates “more than $1 billion in revenue every two years from the residents of Los Angeles, a sum dwarfing the fees it is required to pay the city in return.” The city’s attorneys said that the unpaid franchise fees and Public, Educational, Government use fees represent millions that could be put to use to pay firefighter and police officer salaries and maintain parks and libraries. While the charges in the suit are characteristically byzantine, the city’s central argument would appear to boil down to the “precipitous and wrongful withholding” of contractually owed monies. Feuer’s office seems particularly enraged by the fact that the operator underpaid by as much as $5.22 million at the end of the city’s 2010-11 financial year, which only served to “exacerbate the City’s well-publicized fiscal crisis.” The defendants cited in the 24-page complaint are Time Warner Cable, Inc., Time Warner Cable Pacific West, Time Warner Cable Enterprises and the Time Warner Entertainment Advance/Newhouse Partnership.

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Nickelodeon’s Jim Perry Is Courting More Adult Advertisers

March 14, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Nickelodeon revealed its slate to advertisers yesterday, and while it's all squeaky-clean kids' fare (well, relatively speaking: "As you can see from the reel, bathroom humor still works," observed Nickelodeon president Cyma Zarghami during the presentation), the network is seeking ad partners with a greater emphasis on categories you wouldn't necessarily associate with children. "Kindle is sponsoring the Kids' Choice Awards," said Jim Perry, head of sales for the Nickelodeon group (which includes Nick proper, Nick Jr. and Nick at Nite), "and we now have over 15 retailers on our air—everything from Target and old Navy to Stride Rite and the Burlington Coat Factory." Obviously, that's not because kids are stealing the car and driving to Target. For many years, the rule that advertisers direct their ads at parents and not children was regarded as pro forma by clients. But in recent years, heightening standards (and parental activism) around unhealthy foods, coupled with the decline of the traditional toy market, have meant that advertisers really do have to use Nick—which controls the vast majority of saleable GRPs in the kids' market—to talk to parents themselves. Perry is way ahead of them. "You can really build a great financial literacy campaign around saving and learning the value of a dollar whether or not you're showing a credit card ad," he said. Placements and integrations like Toyota's SpongeBob ... uh, mobile

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UCLA and USC Announce 5th Annual Transforming Hollywood Conference

March 13, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

UCLA School of Theater, Film and Television, USC Annenberg School of Communication and Journalism and USC School of Cinematic Arts announced Wednesday that they will team up once again for the fifth annual Transforming Hollywood: The Future of Television conference. The event, presented by the Andrew J. Kuehn Jr. Foundation, will take place April 4... Read more

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Dems Find Fault With Draft to Reauthorize Satellite Bill

March 12, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

A proposed bill to reauthorize the Satellite Television Extension and Localism Act, or Stela for short, may please broadcasters, cable, and satellite companies, but politics on the communications and technology subcommittee could derail the current draft. Democrats who worked on an earlier draft with Republican Steve Scalise (R-N.J.) made it clear that they didn’t like and weren’t prepared to support the GOP leadership’s draft bill. A lot of political maneuvering went on behind the scenes before communications and technology chairman Greg Walden (R-Ore.), who has been predisposed to a simple reauthorization, released a draft bill that included a few goodies for cable at the end of last week.

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Was Winter 2014 the Onset of the Zombie Apocalypse? [Video]

March 11, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After that wretched polar vortex and a long, long winter, the sun may finally be ready to return to our skies. But let's not forget what happened in Atlanta. Was it the beginning of the end? We ask an expert. And come back next Monday for our full interview with Sam Champion about his new gig running America's Morning Headquarters for the Weather Channel.

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