Posts Tagged ‘television’

Showtime Experiments With Binge Viewing for Andrew Dice Clay Comedy

March 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Showtime CEO David Nevins predicted 2016 would be "the year of customized viewing." Now his network is showing how. On Sunday, April 10, the pay TV network will release the full six-episode season of a new Andrew Dice Clay comedy on its streaming service. Dice, as the show is called, will be available at midnight, ahead of the series' TV premiere at 9:30 p.m. that night. Showtime will continue to run episodes of Dice in that timeslot as it would any other series. The semi-autobiographical scripted comedy follows the raunchy comedian as he attempts to revive his career in Las Vegas. Dice previously appeared on the final season of HBO's Entourage as another fictionalized version of himself. The series also stars Kevin Corrigan, and features guest appearances from Natasha Leggero, Lorraine Bracco, Adrien Brody, Michael Rapaport, Wayne Newton, Criss Angel and Rita Rudner. "With its six episode run, we feel this comedy is ideally suited to being consumed all at once," said Gary Levine, president of programming, Showtime Networks. "We're always looking for new ways to make our programming stand-out, and we're confident that a 'Dice binge' will appeal to both fans and skeptics alike, and help spread the word about his very funny new Showtime series." Showtime is also considering a similar tactic with its upcoming Twin Peaks revival , releasing episodes in batches instead of weekly. The all-at-once release is just the latest example of how TV networks are experimenting with new multiplatform viewing models and ways of delivering episodes in a time-shifted world. In January, TBS premiered the first season of comedy Angie Tribeca as a 25-hour marathon . Last summer, NBC became the first broadcast network to try this strategy when it released the full season of Aquarius following the drama's TV premiere

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How FX Bids for New Series Without the Big Budget of Netflix

March 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As streaming services like Netflix, Amazon and Hulu snap up original series away from linear networks, as well as lure creators with big paydays and promises of creative autonomy, their competitors have had to alter their approaches to bidding for new projects. One of those is FX, which lost out on the bidding for Aziz Ansari's comedy Master of None and the upcoming drama The Crown. Both of those shows went to Netflix after the streaming service "overwhelmed us with shock and awe levels of money and commitment," FX CEO John Landgraf told reporters in January . He also used a "Moneyball" analogy when comparing FX to Netflix, explaining, "Basically, we're competing against payrolls, if you will, a la the Oakland A's and New York Yankees, that are three or four times ours." Because he can't match Netflix dollar for dollar, Landgraf has shifted the focus of his pitches, highlighting other attributes of the network when bidding for shows. Landgraf highlights his marketing team, which has been named PromaxBDA's In-House Marketing Team of the Year for five consecutive years. "I think the talent appreciates that," he told Adweek. Landgraf also emphasizes the personal touch and attention he can give FX's shows versus Netflix, which now has 100 series in the pipeline—55 for adults, 45 for children. "Our network is more of a bespoke organization than a factory. We're at about 18 shows, and that's the most that I can personally pay attention to," said Landgraf. While he could maybe do as many as 20, "I'm at the max in terms of being able to read scripts, watch rough cuts, have a thoughtful input and dialogue." And that's important, even when the network doesn't have much creative feedback in terms of notes for producers. Landgraf said that his deal with Louis CK for Louie specified that the network wasn't able to give him notes.

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ComScore Says Multiplatform Deal With Viacom Will Transform How Ads Are Bought

March 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The newly merged comScore and Rentrak have set their first multiplatform deal with a big client: Viacom. Today, the companies announced a multi-year cross-platform measurement deal, which will allow Viacom to power its Vantage data platform with comScore's measurement tools. That means advertisers will be able to target specific consumers across Viacom's properties and platforms, ranging from linear TV and digital, to video on demand (VOD), and over-the-top (OTT) services. It's the first cross-platform agreement since the comScore and Rentrak merger was completed Feb. 1. Last September, the companies first announced plans to merge and take on Nielsen . "This partnership with comScore marks a fundamental watershed moment in the business of television," said Bryson Gordon, svp, data strategy for Viacom, in a statement. "This revolution in targeting, currency and measurement is the equivalent of shifting from black and white to color. Viacom's longstanding investment in data and innovation and our unique ability to merge creativity and science has positioned us far ahead in the marketplace by delivering what partners crave—the most comprehensive view of the consumer and the most effective way to reach them." ComScore's tools cover more than 40 million televisions and 120 million VOD users in 210 U.S. markets. "We are excited to partner with Viacom on a deal that we believe will transform the way that advertising will be bought and sold," said Serge Matta, CEO of comScore, in a statement. "Viacom's expertise in data strategy makes them an ideal first partner to leverage our cross-platform metrics and advanced demographics as a more powerful currency on which to transact. With these new capabilities, Viacom's advertising partners will be the first to benefit from a radically more efficient way of conducting business and reaching the most precise audiences imaginable." This deal will also bolster Viacom Vantage, which has been one of buyers' favorite data platforms . Viacom has expanded its Vantage suite ahead of the upfront, which it said will simplify data targeting, help clients improve predictive targeting and measure the effectiveness of custom creative marketing campaigns. The deal helps comScore gain ground in its battle with Nielsen, which is working on its rollout of Total Audience Measurement . The company hopes to have that rolled out in time for this year's upfront.

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Infographic: A TV Show’s Appeal Can Determine Ad Recall, Twitter Study Says

March 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Advertising agencies can now blame TV shows when a new spot doesn't quite get the attention they think it deserves—at least sort of. According to a new study by Twitter, Starcom and social TV analytics company Canvs, programming where an audience had high emotions often led them to have higher ad recall. In fact, a survey of 3,500 Twitter users and non-users found that viewers were 48 percent more likely to recall an ad they saw the day before. "Not all TV audiences are created equal: we've long believed that viewers respond differently to commercials depending on how they feel about what they're watching," Heather O'Shea, Twitter's global agency research and data strategy lead, wrote in a blog post. "And when it comes to getting a pulse on people's emotional reactions during live TV, now we know that Twitter can drive even stronger results for brands." Based on the results, O'Shea offered three tips for marketers hoping to harness the double-screen world: 1.

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ABC and Warner Bros.’ New Deal Will Make Binge Watching Easier

March 17, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Networks and studios have been battling for years over stacking rights—the ability to offer in-season episodes via on demand or network streaming—but a new agreement from ABC and Warner Bros. Television Group signals those conflicts could be coming to an end. ABC Entertainment and Warner Bros. Television Group struck a stacking rights deal covering any series produce by Warner Bros. that debuts on ABC in the 2016-17 and 2017-18 seasons. The agreement enables ABC to offer all episodes of its Warner Bros. series launched during the next two seasons on its VOD platforms like ABC.com and Hulu, as well as VOD on MVPD partners like cable and satellite. In doing so, viewers will be able to to binge the entire current season of the show, instead of being restricted to only the last five episodes, as is currently the case for most series. Warner Bros. will retain end-of-season SVOD rights, early syndication rights, early DVD rights and day-after electronic sell-through rights to companies like iTunes. "This is a real win for network television viewers," said Jana Winograde, evp of business operations for ABC Entertainment, in a statement

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As March Madness Tips Off, Here’s Why CBS Will Sit Out the National Championships

March 17, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When Duke and UNC-Wilmington tip off the 2016 NCAA Tournament, CBS will carry the game, a tradition dating to 1982. But as March Madness bleeds into April, CBS will find itself on the bench, as the Final Four and National Championship games will air exclusively on cable. "We knew six years ago when we did this deal," said CBS Sports president Sean McManus. "We circled this date." CBS has been sharing the tournament with Turner's TBS, TNT and TruTV since 2011, but until this year it had exclusive rights to the Championship game. From now until the end of the rights deal – through 2024 – CBS and TBS will alternate airing the Championships. TBS gets this year, part of a growing trend of major sporting events playing out on cable: ESPN has rights to the College Football Playoffs for the next 10 years

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State Farm Is Being Featured in Tonight’s Episode of Black-ish

March 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Faced with declining overnight ratings and the myriad ways viewers can avoid ads, some brands are beginning to master the art of product placement, and networks are reaping the rewards. Last season, ABC's hit comedy Modern Family produced an episode shot entirely with Apple products. But that integration—in an episode called "Connection Lost"—was not a paid placement. Tonight, another ABC sitcom incorporates a well-known brand into its storyline, but this time, it gets something in return. On Black-ish, advertising executive Dre Johnson (played by Anthony Anderson) persuades his client, State Farm Insurance, to sponsor his son's basketball team, the "State Farm Good Neighbors." The integration, created in partnership with Omnicom agency The Marketing Arm, fits with State Farm's already sizeable footprint in basketball—it's a brand partner of the NCAA, NBA and WNBA.

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David Letterman’s Return to TV Takes Him to India

March 15, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

National Geographic Channel is leveraging its global brand to take audiences and advertisers to new places—including the red planet. Courtney Monroe, CEO, National Geographic Global Networks, detailed a bold vision for the network, which she said will look markedly different by year's end. Instead of throwing a large upfront event for advertisers, Monroe is holding one-on-one meetings with select clients this week. Programming details were laid out at a press briefing at New York's Park Hyatt this morning. "Our commitment to the new premium vision of the National Geographic Channel goes way beyond global television," said Toby Byrne, president, ad sales, Fox Networks Group. That involves leveraging the National Geographic brand, which reaches 730 million consumers around the world every month. The network alone reaches 440 million households in 171 countries and 45 languages.

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Little Big Shots Draws 14.8 Million Viewers, and NBC Looks to Cash In With Advertisers

March 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

NBC is used to dominating broadcast ratings on Sunday nights, but it usually only happens during football season. The network's Sunday fortunes routinely dry up once Sunday Night Football signs off for the year. But NBC felt like Christmas (or the next NFL season) came early when it looked at this Sunday night's ratings. The debut of Little Big Shots, the Steve Harvey-hosted variety show that showcases talented kids, drew 14.8 million viewers overall and a 2.8 rating in the 18-49 demographic (which translates to around 3.56 million viewers). It was NBC's most-watched regular Sunday entertainment telecast since March 13, 2005, when an episode of Law & Order: Criminal Intent attracted 15.7 million viewers. The total viewer ratings improved on the show's post-Voice debut on Tuesday, when 12.8 million viewers tuned in and it had a 2.9 rating among 18- to 49-year-olds. It marked the first time NBC has won an in-season Sunday outright among broadcast networks in the 18-49 demo with a full night of entertainment series programming since April 8, 2004 (when the lineup consisted of Dateline, a Law & Order: Criminal Intent repeat and Crossing Jordan). And while most new shows lose viewers during the hour, Little Big Shots actually gained audience in its second half, jumping from a 2.6 demo rating to a 3.1. Now, with a surprise midseason hit on its hands—one that could help NBC hold on to the coveted 18-49 demo crown for the third year in a row —NBCUniversal's ad sales team has six episodes of the series left to try and cash in with advertisers. "We still have a little bit of time to do something fun, and we're certainly going to be out there in the next week or two trying to find people in the scatter market that are interested in figuring that out," said Dan Lovinger, evp, entertainment ad sales group, NBCUniversal. "But the last thing we want to do is something hasty that isn't well thought out

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Why USA Network’s Mr. Robot Put a 100-Foot Ferris Wheel in Downtown Austin [Video]

March 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

USA Network's critical darling, Mr. Robot, created major buzz at last year's South by Southwest, where it premiered the show and won the festival's audience award. So it only makes sense that the network would bring the series back to Austin to get fans excited for the upcoming second season —and to do so on a grand scale. That's why, if you're at SXSW Interactive, you've probably seen a 100-foot Ferris wheel designed to look like Coney Island's famed Wonder Wheel. The four-day activation, which ends today, recreates key moments and sets from the show, like the F Society hacker den on Coney Island, to immerse fans in the Mr. Robot world.

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