Posts Tagged ‘television’

Discovery Is Fast-Tracking Its Own Spin on Serial

January 9, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With the runaway success of WBEZ Chicago's true crime podcast Serial,

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Discovery Is Fast-Tracking Its Own Spin on Serial

January 9, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With the runaway success of WBEZ Chicago's true crime podcast Serial,

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Five Shows Premiering This Winter That You Need to See

January 8, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Another new year, another bumper crop of slots on your DVR waiting to be filled with shows that haven't been canceled or started to smell funny after a few episodes. But where to look? We figured we'd look everywhere, so below, please check out our best bets for the first part of 2015 (yes, we cheated slightly—that new Amazon show premiered last month, but it's on demand and it's really good). Of course, you'd be unwise to count out broadcast entirely—there's a new cop show from no less than Vince Gilligan, and we liked the pilot a lot. And iZombie (which, oddly, still doesn't have a premiere date) is one of the best shows we've seen all season.

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Holy Crap, This Guy Does a Freakin’ Sweet Peter Griffin Impression

January 8, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If you've ever watched Fox's animated classic Family Guy, you're familiar with the show's larger-than-life, not-quite-everyman, crass-but-lovable star, Peter Griffin. Well, this year at New York Comic-Con, Robert Franzese took to the show floor in glasses and green pants, entertaining everyone he encountered with his spot-on impression of the Quahog, R.I., native.

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Dish Parries With Fox on Programming Fees

December 22, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

21st Century Fox has become the latest broadcaster to have its programming pulled from the Dish Network lineup, following similar disputes by Turner Broadcasting and CBS Corp., which led to similar blackouts in the past several months. In a statement, Dish executive Warren Schlichting noted, "It's like we're about to close on a house and the realtor is trying to make us buy a new car as well. Fox blacked out two of its news channels, using them as leverage to triple rates on sports and entertainment channels that are not in this contract." Fox, on the other hand, claimed that Dish pulled the plug on Fox's Fox News Channel and Fox Business Network. "They did not want to accept terms and commitments that have become customary in a Fox News renewal," Tim Carry, the Fox News executive heading up distribution, told The Wall Street Journal. Carry went on to tell CNET, "It is unfortunate that the millions of Fox News viewers on Dish were used as pawns by their provider. Hopefully they will vote with their hard earned money and seek another one of our other valued distributors immediately." According to Dish, the problem is that Fox introduced channels into the negotiations that are not up for renewal to get higher rates across the board

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The 10 Most Ridiculous Things TV Network Presidents Said in 2014

December 19, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

We've spent a lot of time talking about the best that 2014 had to offer, but what about everything that lies on the other end of the year's quality spectrum? The network presidents spent much of 2014 bragging about, and defending, their various programming and scheduling decisions, no matter how foolish some of them turned out. But some of those proclamations were so outrageous that they deserve revisiting. (I wanted to call this the network presidents' "10 Biggest Lies of 2014," but in fairness they actually believed at least some of these things to be true at the time they said them.) And if you think Kevin Reilly, who stepped down as Fox entertainment chairman on May 29, is going to figure prominently on this list ... you would be correct. 10. Gotham isn't going to have a 22-episode season

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The Colbert Report Is Dead. Long Live Stephen Colbert

December 18, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In his second night as host of The Colbert Report, Oct. 18, 2005, Stephen Colbert made a joke that wasn't really a joke. Over the course of the show's run, he promised, viewers would be treated to installments in "a 435-part series" called Better Know a District. He didn't make it to 435, but he almost broke triple digits. During its just-under-a-decade on the air, the show visited a full 93 Congressional districts in the U.S. (and one in the U.K., because it's a comedy show, after all), and that's not counting the districts he revisited. He explored major industries, minor policy issues and daily life all over the country, which, viewers were gently reminded, is huge. No national news program in history has devoted that much time to systematically covering individual members of Congress—why would you? It's boring unless there's a scandal, right? With one of his first initiatives, Colbert proved, as he so often would, that the media's assumptions about America were wrong. Colbert is ending his half-hour late-night comedy news show The Colbert Report, one of the strangest and most wonderful television series ever to exist, to take a job with CBS as the host of the Late Show when David Letterman retires. It's a signal honor, one that comedians spend their entire lives dreaming about, and yet if you've loved the Colbert Report, this move can also feel like a step down. Letterman is widely beloved, even despite a fairly sleazy intraoffice sex scandal in 2009 .

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5 Ways Television Changed Dramatically in 2014

December 17, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Television advertising has been a pretty conservative marketplace: You buy Nielsen ratings, you make 30-second advertisements and sometimes you buy product placement. But the sudden ascent of non-Nielsen-rated content has created a gaping void in the measurement world. And popular genres like horror, with shows such as The Walking Dead, Game of Thrones and American Horror Story, aren't super friendly to adjacencies and product placement. Who wants to see consecutive bites taken out of a leg and a cheeseburger? (Game of Thrones, of course, isn't even ad-supported). So here are a few ways the industry is changing, and what it means for 2015. 1. Ratings went crazy. What happened? The measurement world's lack of visibility into the mobile and tablet spaces generated shrugs until fairly recently. It's become spectacularly—maybe horribly—easy to spy on computer users' surfing habits (no, "incognito mode" does not hide you from anybody except your mom). But your cell phone and your iPad are still difficult to track, mostly because in-browser viewing isn't the norm. Video apps like Hulu are much harder to track with cookies because you aren't in your browser. And that's where a huge, valuable chunk of viewing takes place. So Nielsen (which suffered a serious black eye at the beginning of the season by spilling coffee on the keyboard or something on a bunch of its Live+SD figures, resulting in some major corrections) is racing to make its gross ratings point tool, the one advertisers pay for in non-theoretical money, the standard across not just linear cable and broadcast, but new media, as well. It's not there yet, partly because there's still significant dispute over whether or not an ad delivered on a smartphone is worth the same amount of money as an ad delivered on a 50-inch plasma screen

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These Films, Books and TV Shows Ruled Tumblr’s Sponsored Entertainment Posts in 2014

December 17, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It's the end of the year, and Tumblr is recapping its top branded entertainment posts of 2014. With the average desktop user spending 14 minutes per visit in October, according to comScore, it's clear why leading entertainment companies are advertising on the Yahoo-owned microblogging site.

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Will a Wide Audience Tune In to Hockey’s Most Rugged Game of the Year?

December 16, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Every New Year, the National Hockey League takes one of its regular-season games outdoors—an old-school showdown in the freezing-cold elements. And this time, it's looking for innovative ways to draw fans to the Winter Classic. The promotion begins at 10 tonight with the first of a four-part reality series called 2015 Road to the Winter Classic. In the past, the special aired on HBO, available only to subscribers. But after negotiations broke down with HBO over that point, the NHL decided to take its show to Epix—and a wider audience. Viewers will get a fly-on-the-wall look at the Chicago Blackhawks and Washington Capitals as they work their way toward a New Year's Day game at Washington, D.C.'s Nationals Park. In addition to airing on Epix, a relative newcomer that stands to benefit from hockey's 60 million U.S. fans, the series will be available to stream on the teams' websites, Epix.com, and NHL.com. Fans can also easily find the show through both company's Facebook pages; the NHL App for Android and iPhone; and the Epix App for Xbox 360, PS3, PS4, Roku and Windows 8

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