Posts Tagged ‘television’

ABC Will Air the Oscars Through at Least 2028

August 31, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

ABC remains the only one of the big four broadcast networks shut out of the NFL broadcast business, but it has a lock on its yearly marquee live TV event for the next 12 years. The network and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences have extended their agreement for ABC to broadcast the Academy Awards—which is usually the most-watched entertainment program of the year—through 2028. This is an eight-year extension of the previous ABC/AMPAS deal, which was set to expire in 2020. "We're honored to continue our storied and successful partnership with ABC in broadcasting the most watched live entertainment event of the year," said Academy president Cheryl Boone Isaacs in a statement. "In 2028, we'll mark the Oscars 100th anniversary, and ABC is the perfect partner to help us celebrate the magic of movies with our fans. "After hosting the Academy Awards more than 50 times, ABC has become the home for Hollywood's most prestigious and glamorous night of television," said Ben Sherwood, co-chairman of Disney media networks and president of Disney-ABC Television Group, in a statement. "Broadcast television brings together the biggest audiences with high-quality live events, and ABC has the brightest, boldest lineup in the business." The deal was important for ABC, which doesn't enjoy the ratings bumps that CBS, NBC and Fox receive from broadcasting NFL games each fall or from airing what is always the year's most-watched TV program, the Super Bowl, every three years. Those games help keep those networks on top of the ratings each season, leaving ABC to instead tout its status as No. 1 network for entertainment programming (i.e.

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This Study From Nielsen and Google Says YouTube and Linear TV Help Each Other

August 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

YouTube and TV—two competing mediums fighting for the same eyeballs and advertising dollars—might actually be able to find common ground. A Nielsen case study commissioned by Google found that TV reach seems to drive YouTube engagement, and in turn, YouTube engagement drives TV reach. In other words, according to the report, people who view a TV program's content on YouTube are more likely to tune in to the actual show. Because of that, as TV audience increases, so does YouTube viewership. According to Nielsen, digital advertising in the U.S. has been rising 15 percent every year since 2012 with no signs of slowing down. (In fact, according to eMarketer , digital ad spending will surpass TV as soon as next year.) But the seemingly symbiotic relationship could be a sign for advertisers that both mediums might be better than just one. "The notion that YouTube can bring new people into a show while also keeping current fans connected presents a big opportunity for both programmers, as well as advertisers, who seek to capture audiences whenever and wherever they watch premium content," said Jonathan Zepp, Google's head of North American partnerships for YouTube. To conduct the study, Nielsen evaluated 30 TV shows—including genres such as comedy, competition, drama and talk shows—while analyzing historical data from YouTube and TV currency data from Nielsen's own sources. Researchers then looked to see how the two formats moved in relationship with each other apart from promotions, seasonality, brand effect and show engagement. Researchers also studied habits of those who watched TV content on YouTube and compared it to those who didn't. The results were "significant," according to the case study of Nielsen's findings.

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Sesame Street Fans No Longer Need HBO to Watch Elmo and Cookie Monster on TV

August 25, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For the past year, the only way to get to Sesame Street—and watch new episodes featuring Elmo, Big Bird, Cookie Monster and the rest of the gang—was by subscribing to HBO, which has exclusive rights to the show through 2020. But starting in September, Sprout is offering fans a new way to see two of those characters without subscribing to the premium cable network. Elmo and Cookie Monster will appear in The Furchester Hotel, a new series on Sprout from Sesame Workshop and the BBC's preschool children's channel, CBeebies. The show takes place at a hotel operated by a family of monsters, including Funella Furchester, husband Furgus Fuzz and daughter Phoebe Furchester-Fuzz. Elmo, who is Phoebe's cousin, is on "an extended visit," according to a release, while Cookie Monster works at the hotel as a room-service and dining-room waiter. Both Elmo and Cookie Monster will be regular characters on the show. Beginning Sept. 26, 11-minute episodes of The Furchester Hotel will air weekdays at 9 a.m. and weekends at 11 a.m. (the weekend time slot will shift to 7 a.m.

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Why This ‘Fear the Walking Dead’ Star Didn’t Watch the Original Show

August 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Age 46 Claim to fame Stars as Victor Strand on AMC's Fear the Walking Dead (Sundays, 9 p.m.); appears in the upcoming film The Birth of a Nation (Oct. 7); directs Barbecue at the Geffen Playhouse in L.A. (Sept. 6 to Oct. 16) Base Los Angeles Twitter @colmandomingo Adweek: What's the first information you consume in the morning? Colman Domingo: I hate to say it—I reach for my phone and go on Twitter. And CNN.com, especially because we're in the middle of this heated political season

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NBC’s Olympics Ratings Rebounded a Bit Thursday Night

August 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It was an inspiring night in Olympics competition Thursday, with Team USA's Ashton Eaton taking home the gold in the men's decathlon and Usain Bolt flying to a third consecutive gold medal in the 200 meters. But NBC's Olympics coverage was a bit slower out of the blocks, averaging 21.7 million viewers, a slight rebound from Wednesday night. Still, Thursday was one of the lowest-rated nights of the Rio Games so far. On the upside, NBC's Olympics coverage continues to outpace the broadcast competition, beating broadcast rivals CBS, Fox and ABC combined. Thursday night marked the 115th consecutive night that an NBC Summer Olympics presentation has topped prime time. According to NBC, the network's Summer Games have won 131 of 132 nights since the dawn of People Meters. NBC's prime-time rating of 7.0 among 18- to 49-year-olds was about three times the combined rating of the other broadcast networks.

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Olympic Roundup: U.S. Reaches 1,000th Summer Olympics Gold

August 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Saturday Michael Phelps finished his last competition at the Summer Olympics in Rio—and his career—with a gold medal, and Simone Manuel gave the U.S. its 1,000th Summer Olympic gold medal. The U.S. is still on top in the medals race. Here's what marketers need to know about the last 24 hours of the Olympics: American Women's Medley Relay Wins 1,000th Summer Olympic Gold Medal for U.S. Simone Manuel won the gold medal for a 4x100-meter medley relay Saturday after taking a silver medal in the 50-meter freestyle. The gold medal marked the United States' 1000th Summer Olympic gold. (NBC Olympics) Here's the total medal leaderboard as it stood going into Sunday, according to NBC Olympics: United States: 60 China: 41 Great Britain: 30 Japan: 24 Ruussia: 23 Michael Phelps Helps U.S. to 4x100-Meter Medley Relay Win in Final Rio Race In the last Olympics competition of his career—the 4x100-meter medley relay—Michael Phelps won the gold, giving him 23 career gold medals. "It turned out pretty cool. It's just a perfect way to finish," he said. (ESPN) Jamaica's Elaine Thompson Is the Fastest Woman in the World Elaine Thompson of Jamaica became the unofficial fastest woman in the world Saturday after winning the women's 100 meters

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NBC Gets Its Lowest Olympics Ratings Since Saturday, but Men’s Basketball Boosts NBCSN

August 11, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Wednesday night's Rio Olympics action featured a victory for U.S. beach volleyball stars Kerri Walsh Jennings and April Ross, another gold medal for legendary Japanese gymnast Kohei Uchimura, and a gold in the 200-meter freestyle relay for Katie Ledecky and the U.S. women. But the action Wednesday couldn't match Tuesday night's heroics, and early Nielsen ratings reflect that. The network delivered a 17.4 overnight rating (down 21 percent from the previous night) and an 8.9 prime-time rating in the 18-49 demo, which was down 11 percent from Tuesday night. They were the lowest figures since NBC Olympics' Saturday evening coverage. (Average total viewer figures will be released later this afternoon.) It was a positive evening for NBCSN, however. The U.S. men's basketball win over Australia and Brazil's defeat of Denmark in men's soccer gave the network a an Olympics-best 1.41 overnight rating. Salt Lake City (24.4) was once again the top local market for NBC Olympics evening coverage, followed by Denver (22.3), Indianapolis (20.0), St. Louis (19.4) and Columbus (19.2).

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The People V. O.J. Simpson, Mr. Robot and Black-ish Win TCA Awards

August 7, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story cemented its status as one of the year's most acclaimed shows on Saturday, as it picked up three Television Critics Awards. At the L.A. ceremony, FX's critically acclaimed miniseries, which is nominated for 22 Emmys next month, was honored in a trio of categories: program of the year, outstanding achievement in movies, miniseries and specials, as well as individual achievement in drama for Sarah Paulson, who played Marcia Clark. The 2016 TCA Awards, which honor the top TV shows and actors of the past season, recognized some programs and stars overlooked by Emmy voters, including Crazy Ex-Girlfriend star Rachel Bloom (individual achievement in comedy) and Full Frontal with Samantha Bee (outstanding achievement in news and information), which did land a writing nomination, but was shut out in the variety talk series category.

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Here’s Why NBC Believes Viewers Are So Frustrated With Olympics Ads

August 6, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

While 28 percent fewer people tuned into NBC's Rio Olympics opening ceremony than London's Summer Games four years ago, some of those who did watch Friday night weren't happy with what they considered a series of commercials occasionally interrupted by an opening ceremony. Viewers took to social media to complain about NBC's heavy ad load during the ceremony, especially early on, and the network's decision to air and stream the ceremony on a one-hour delay. NBC Sports, however, told Adweek that the ad load was "very similar" to that for the London opening ceremony, but because viewing habits have changed so much in the past four years, the commercial breaks are now more noticeable to audiences. They sure were. Many viewers took to Reddit and social media (some using the hashtag #nbcfail) to complain about NBC's presentation of the opening ceremony: In effort to realize record profits from Rio 2016, NBC to become first network to air more than 60 minutes of commercials in a single hour. — Norman Chad (@NormanChad) August 6, 2016 Conversation in NBC conference room. "If we tape delay one hour we can add a full hour of commercials." "Brilliant." #OpeningCeremony — Bob Kevoian (@bobkevoian) August 6, 2016 nbc olympics coverage: where there are commercials about commercials — Sam Stryker (@sbstryker) August 6, 2016 That response could be alarming news for NBC Sports, which has already sold $1.2 billion in national Olympics ads, 75 percent of which accounted for advertising in NBC's prime-time coverage. "As we did for London, we inserted a few more commercials earlier in the show so that we can afford time later in the show to present as much of the ceremony as we can, including every single country in the Parade of Nations," said an NBC Sports spokesperson. "Given that the commercial load was very similar to London, we believe that consumption habits, such as binge-watching and 'marathoning,' have changed perceptions among the viewing audience regarding commercials." Once the ceremony got under way, NBC did space out the ad breaks closer to 15 minutes, which was less frequent that the usual seven-minute average between ad breaks. As for the decision to broadcast and stream the opening ceremony on a one-hour delay, NBC Sports Group chairman Mark Lazarus said last month that while Rio would be the most "live" Olympics yet because it's only an hour ahead of the East Coast, the network was delaying the opening ceremony "to give context to the show. This opening ceremony will be a celebration of Brazilian culture, of the pageantry, of the excitement, of the flare that this beautiful nation has. And we think it's important that we're able to be that in context for the viewer so it's not just a flash of color." After Friday night's social media outrage, an NBC Sports spokesperson offered a further explanation for the opening ceremony delay: "It's not a sports competition. It's a cultural ceremony that requires deep levels of understanding, with numerous camera angles and our commentary laid over it

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Despite Rio Risks, Summer Olympics Ratings Could Be Highest Ever

August 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Three days before the Rio Olympics are set to kick off, NBC execs are keeping their fingers crossed that their coverage will be focused more on the athletes and competition, and not on all the other issues plaguing Rio in the run-up to the Games. NBCUniversal is offering 6,755 hours of Rio Olympic programming overall, including 2,084 hours of coverage across 11 linear networks. NBC alone will broadcast 260.5 hours of coverage. The result is "one of the biggest endeavors in media history," said NBC Olympics executive producer Jim Bell, who spoke via satellite from Rio to reporters at the Television Critics Association's summer press tour in L.A. And given that Rio is just one hour ahead of the East Coast, much of NBC's primetime coverage will air live (though the opening ceremony will be on a one-hour delay ). After months of "political pie fights" and other sad national and international news, "I think America is ready … to get some relief from all of that," said NBC Olympics correspondent Mary Carillo. But will that actually happen? While all Olympic host cities risk major issues going into the Games, "Rio probably has the biggest array of problems or potential problems," said Bob Costas, who will once again host NBC's primetime coverage. That includes environmental, economic and safety issues in Rio de Janeiro, including a police crisis, questions about infrastructure, the polluted Guanabara Bay and the Zika virus. Those pre-Games concerns usually end up fading into the background as the Olympics get under way, and "we hope it will be the same [in Rio], because there are so many great stories of the athletes," said Costas. "We're here to cover the Olympics

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