Posts Tagged ‘television’

Rainn Wilson Shares His Favorite Super Bowl Ad (He Just Can’t Remember What It’s For)

January 27, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who Rainn Wilson Age 49 Claim to Fame

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This Winter’s Timeslot Battles Feature Some of the Strangest Shows on the Dial

January 27, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Broadcast networks are pitting their bench players against each other after a particularly poor showing in the fall. Some matchups are anyone's guess, and some are just plain weird. Interestingly, there's more new content than usual on the air this winter, quite a bit of it from ABC. With the distraction of the Super Bowl soon to be over, these shows have to perform well, and quickly: May, and cancellation, isn't far away.

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Nascar Legends Richard Petty and Dale Earnhardt Loom Large in New Campaign

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Stock car legends Richard "The King" Petty and the late Dale "The Intimidator" Earnhardt won the most Nascar season titles with seven apiece—putting them in rarified air among the many drivers who have raced over the decades. Richard "The King" Petty provides voiceover in new spots. | Photo: Tom Pennington/Nascar via Getty Images Nascar and title sponsor Comcast will tap into their regal racing legacy to position the renamed Nascar Xfinity Series as the proving ground where future legends are born. Four out of five Nascar fans are also NFL fans. Comcast will use the spotlight around this weekend's Super Bowl XLIX to promote the kickoff of the 2015 Xfinity series Feb. 21 at Daytona International Speedway. Comcast and Nascar gave Adweek an exclusive look at the new campaign by Goodby, Silverstein & Partners, San Francisco. The new spot will break Jan. 30 during NBC Sports Network's coverage of Nascar Hall of Fame ceremonies, then re-air on NFL Network's Super Bowl Saturday Night and NBC's coverage of the NFL Honors show the night before the Big Game. Called "Out There," the first 30-second spot features a voiceover by the folksy Petty. The King notes there's some aggressive young Xfinity driver out there, right now, who could "intimidate The Intimidator."

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ESPN’s Music Focus: How Athletes and Artists Are Learning From Each Other

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In recent years, ESPN's music focus has come to rival that of MTV. The cable network uses songs from diverse artists to bolster its sports coverage—and makes music a regular feature of its glossy magazine to entice readers and ad dollars. ESPN The Magazine's third "Music Issue" dropped last Friday, once

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Things Super Bowl Viewers Love (Besides the Big Game)

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

How do the interests of Super Bowl viewers compare to those less invested in the Big Game? Audience measurement firm GfK MRI asked 25,000 U.S. adult Super Bowl fans about their daily activities, consumer behaviors, assets and goals. Many of the conclusions seem somewhat obvious—Super Bowl viewers, for example, index lower for activities related to fashion and makeup, and very high for other sports viewing and participation—but other stats point to an evolution of the typical football fan. "In the more than three decades that we've surveyed consumers about their Super Bowl viewing, we have seen steady growth not only in total audience but in diversity across gender, ethnic and other demographic characteristics—a trend that is increasingly rare in an increasingly stratifying media landscape," said Florian Kahlert, managing director of GfK MRI. "If you can justify the price tag, the Super Bowl can be a marketer's dream. A huge, diverse, engaged live audience that truly considers advertising to be integral to content and an earned media potential that is second to none." GfK MRI, which provided these results to Adweek exclusively, noted that any results above a 110 index is considered significant, indicating that a Super Bowl fan is 10 percent more likely to participate in an activity than an average U.S. adult. Infographic: Carlos Monteiro

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Things Super Bowl Viewers Love (Besides the Big Game)

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

How do the interests of Super Bowl viewers compare to those less invested in the Big Game? Audience measurement firm GfK MRI asked 25,000 U.S. adult Super Bowl fans about their daily activities, consumer behaviors, assets and goals. Many of the conclusions seem somewhat obvious—Super Bowl viewers, for example, index lower for activities related to fashion and makeup, and very high for other sports viewing and participation—but other stats point to an evolution of the typical football fan. "In the more than three decades that we've surveyed consumers about their Super Bowl viewing, we have seen steady growth not only in total audience but in diversity across gender, ethnic and other demographic characteristics—a trend that is increasingly rare in an increasingly stratifying media landscape," said Florian Kahlert, managing director of GfK MRI.

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Larry Wilmore on How He Landed The Nightly Report and What He Learned From Jon Stewart

January 24, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When CBS tapped Stephen Colbert to succeed David Letterman as its Late Show host, many people assumed Larry Wilmore—The Daily Show's "senior black correspondent" since 2006 — would be a natural fit to take over Colbert's 11:30 p.m. Comedy Central slot. But not Wilmore himself. "I didn't think about it at all. I was working on the Black-ish pilot at the time, so my mind was trying to get that going," said Wilmore, who had signed on as showrunner for the ABC comedy (he previously created The PJs and The Bernie Mac Show). But his Daily Show boss, Jon Stewart, set his sights on Wilmore, and last May, Comedy Central announced that he would indeed step in for Colbert to host The Minority Show with Larry Wilmore. The title ended up being short-lived. Fox began developing a series based on the 2002 Tom Cruise sci-fi film Minority Report, which would have forced Wilmore to use his show's full name on all platforms. So in November, the program was retitled The Nightly Report with Larry Wilmore. What hasn't changed is the show's concept: a mix of Wilmore's unique comic voice and a panel discussion about the day's pertinent issues. "No one has taken the point of view of the underdog, which is my view of the world," he said. "And Jon's idea was to populate it with people who don't always get a shot in that landscape. So it's a combination of those two things." Before The Nightly Report's well-received debut Monday, Wilmore sat down to discuss his new show, its last-minute name change and how mastering social media can be even more daunting than replacing Colbert. Adweek: I understand why you had to lose The Minority Report, but how tough was it to make that title change so late in the game? Larry Wilmore: Well, we made the call on the field, so to speak, before it really got too late. Part of our constructing the show was understanding how the audience sees content these days. They see it through social platforms—Twitter, Facebook—so your show has to live in those environments. And it was becoming very difficult to operate in those environments and having to use The Minority Report with Larry Wilmore as a complete tag all the time. We were being confined legally by doing that in all forms of everything, and it was becoming a nightmare.

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Activist Ad Strips Away Redskins’ Logo to Show ‘It’s Still Washington Football’

January 23, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When Washington's Robert Griffin III—RG3, to you—runs a 76-yard touchdown to the roaring applause of adoring fans, does it matter what's printed on his helmet? That's the question posed by a new ad from the National Congress of American Indians and the Oneida Indian Nation. In the spot, featuring real footage from a 2012 game against the Minnesota Vikings, the Redskins' name and logo have been removed from the play. "Take it away," says a title card that comes up over the cheering of Unnamed Team fans. "Take it away and it's still Washington football." The online-only ad from Goodness Mfg. is partof the NCAI's long campaign to compel Dan Snyder, owner of the Redskins, to change the team's name, arguing that the term's long history as an ethnic slur is reason enough to adopt a moniker that doesn't insult an entire ethnic group. Snyder has both combatively dug in his heels and offered his detractors odd olive branches, perhaps the strangest being the team's Washington Redskins Foundation for Original Americans. Snyder has vowed never to change the name. (Although he could always sell the team so someone else can do it. ) This Super Bowl is dogged by major PR problems for the NFL —between the controversy over Ray Rice's videotaped altercation with his fiancee and the league's subsequent coverup, Adrian Peterson's child-abuse allegations and smaller-scale controversies like #DeflateGate, football is in a certain amount of trouble.

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TV Academy Recruits DWA’s Susan Spencer to Lead Marketing Push

January 23, 2015  |  Variety  |  No Comments

The Television Academy has tapped DreamWorks Animation alum Susan Spencer to oversee marketing and PR as the org prepares for a burst of activity surrounding the construction of a media center on its North Hollywood campus, among other initiatives. As senior VP of media and brand management, Spencer will be tasked with burnishing the TV Academy’s... Read more

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Conan Tours Taco Bell HQ, Visits the Test Kitchen and Ends Up Convulsing on the Floor

January 22, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If you've ever seen late-night mastermind Conan O'Brien venture into the real world and interact with the commoners, you know you're in for a treat whenever it happens. Turns out the head of Conan's I.T. department, Chris Hayes, is a Taco Bell superfan, eating it at least three times a week. As Conan is a benevolent boss, he decides to make Mr. Hayes' dream come true and take him to Taco Bell headquarters in Irvine, Calif. We get an interesting glimpse behind the tortilla curtain, where we see how the magic happens. But more important, comedy ensues as Conan and Hayes rollick through the chalupa palace, interacting with food taste testers, trying new creations in the "Innovation Kitchen" as well as inventing new ones like Conan's Irish-inspired concoction, "The O'Taco." It's not all flattering to the brand, but it ends up putting the chain in a good light just because it's so entertainingly honest. So, sit back and enjoy this hilarious tour of Taco Bell HQ, with your guide, Conan O'Brien.

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