Posts Tagged ‘television’

NBC Gets Its Lowest Olympics Ratings Since Saturday, but Men’s Basketball Boosts NBCSN

August 11, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Wednesday night's Rio Olympics action featured a victory for U.S. beach volleyball stars Kerri Walsh Jennings and April Ross, another gold medal for legendary Japanese gymnast Kohei Uchimura, and a gold in the 200-meter freestyle relay for Katie Ledecky and the U.S. women. But the action Wednesday couldn't match Tuesday night's heroics, and early Nielsen ratings reflect that. The network delivered a 17.4 overnight rating (down 21 percent from the previous night) and an 8.9 prime-time rating in the 18-49 demo, which was down 11 percent from Tuesday night. They were the lowest figures since NBC Olympics' Saturday evening coverage. (Average total viewer figures will be released later this afternoon.) It was a positive evening for NBCSN, however. The U.S. men's basketball win over Australia and Brazil's defeat of Denmark in men's soccer gave the network a an Olympics-best 1.41 overnight rating. Salt Lake City (24.4) was once again the top local market for NBC Olympics evening coverage, followed by Denver (22.3), Indianapolis (20.0), St. Louis (19.4) and Columbus (19.2).

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The People V. O.J. Simpson, Mr. Robot and Black-ish Win TCA Awards

August 7, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story cemented its status as one of the year's most acclaimed shows on Saturday, as it picked up three Television Critics Awards. At the L.A. ceremony, FX's critically acclaimed miniseries, which is nominated for 22 Emmys next month, was honored in a trio of categories: program of the year, outstanding achievement in movies, miniseries and specials, as well as individual achievement in drama for Sarah Paulson, who played Marcia Clark. The 2016 TCA Awards, which honor the top TV shows and actors of the past season, recognized some programs and stars overlooked by Emmy voters, including Crazy Ex-Girlfriend star Rachel Bloom (individual achievement in comedy) and Full Frontal with Samantha Bee (outstanding achievement in news and information), which did land a writing nomination, but was shut out in the variety talk series category.

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Here’s Why NBC Believes Viewers Are So Frustrated With Olympics Ads

August 6, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

While 28 percent fewer people tuned into NBC's Rio Olympics opening ceremony than London's Summer Games four years ago, some of those who did watch Friday night weren't happy with what they considered a series of commercials occasionally interrupted by an opening ceremony. Viewers took to social media to complain about NBC's heavy ad load during the ceremony, especially early on, and the network's decision to air and stream the ceremony on a one-hour delay. NBC Sports, however, told Adweek that the ad load was "very similar" to that for the London opening ceremony, but because viewing habits have changed so much in the past four years, the commercial breaks are now more noticeable to audiences. They sure were. Many viewers took to Reddit and social media (some using the hashtag #nbcfail) to complain about NBC's presentation of the opening ceremony: In effort to realize record profits from Rio 2016, NBC to become first network to air more than 60 minutes of commercials in a single hour. — Norman Chad (@NormanChad) August 6, 2016 Conversation in NBC conference room. "If we tape delay one hour we can add a full hour of commercials." "Brilliant." #OpeningCeremony — Bob Kevoian (@bobkevoian) August 6, 2016 nbc olympics coverage: where there are commercials about commercials — Sam Stryker (@sbstryker) August 6, 2016 That response could be alarming news for NBC Sports, which has already sold $1.2 billion in national Olympics ads, 75 percent of which accounted for advertising in NBC's prime-time coverage. "As we did for London, we inserted a few more commercials earlier in the show so that we can afford time later in the show to present as much of the ceremony as we can, including every single country in the Parade of Nations," said an NBC Sports spokesperson. "Given that the commercial load was very similar to London, we believe that consumption habits, such as binge-watching and 'marathoning,' have changed perceptions among the viewing audience regarding commercials." Once the ceremony got under way, NBC did space out the ad breaks closer to 15 minutes, which was less frequent that the usual seven-minute average between ad breaks. As for the decision to broadcast and stream the opening ceremony on a one-hour delay, NBC Sports Group chairman Mark Lazarus said last month that while Rio would be the most "live" Olympics yet because it's only an hour ahead of the East Coast, the network was delaying the opening ceremony "to give context to the show. This opening ceremony will be a celebration of Brazilian culture, of the pageantry, of the excitement, of the flare that this beautiful nation has. And we think it's important that we're able to be that in context for the viewer so it's not just a flash of color." After Friday night's social media outrage, an NBC Sports spokesperson offered a further explanation for the opening ceremony delay: "It's not a sports competition. It's a cultural ceremony that requires deep levels of understanding, with numerous camera angles and our commentary laid over it

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Despite Rio Risks, Summer Olympics Ratings Could Be Highest Ever

August 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Three days before the Rio Olympics are set to kick off, NBC execs are keeping their fingers crossed that their coverage will be focused more on the athletes and competition, and not on all the other issues plaguing Rio in the run-up to the Games. NBCUniversal is offering 6,755 hours of Rio Olympic programming overall, including 2,084 hours of coverage across 11 linear networks. NBC alone will broadcast 260.5 hours of coverage. The result is "one of the biggest endeavors in media history," said NBC Olympics executive producer Jim Bell, who spoke via satellite from Rio to reporters at the Television Critics Association's summer press tour in L.A. And given that Rio is just one hour ahead of the East Coast, much of NBC's primetime coverage will air live (though the opening ceremony will be on a one-hour delay ). After months of "political pie fights" and other sad national and international news, "I think America is ready … to get some relief from all of that," said NBC Olympics correspondent Mary Carillo. But will that actually happen? While all Olympic host cities risk major issues going into the Games, "Rio probably has the biggest array of problems or potential problems," said Bob Costas, who will once again host NBC's primetime coverage. That includes environmental, economic and safety issues in Rio de Janeiro, including a police crisis, questions about infrastructure, the polluted Guanabara Bay and the Zika virus. Those pre-Games concerns usually end up fading into the background as the Olympics get under way, and "we hope it will be the same [in Rio], because there are so many great stories of the athletes," said Costas. "We're here to cover the Olympics

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Turner Will Continue Reduced Ad Loads on TNT Next Year, and Could Expand to TBS in 2018

August 1, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Turner's experiment with reduced ad loads of up to 50 percent on TNT's new drama Animal Kingdom this summer has been so successful that the company is already planning on expanding its scope over the next two years. TNT will offer 50 percent reduced ad loads on all its new original dramas in 2017, and could also expand that offering to TBS' original series in 2018, TNT and TBS president Kevin Reilly told reporters today at the Television Critics Association's summer press tour in Los Angeles. "We're seeing very, very good results for that," said Reilly, who is also chief creative officer for Turner Entertainment, of Animal Kingdom's ad load reduction, which has added 10 minutes or more of content per episode. "Not only is the commercial rating higher, but we're also seeing a nice ratings lift." Reilly said Turner is still waiting on more data, but "we've seen indications there will be a higher brand recall." Focus groups have noted that "you really see the difference," he added. There was a "robust" response to TNT's reduced ad loads in this year's upfront, where Turner secured double-digit CPM gains . Turner ad sales chief Donna Speciale and her team sold reduced ad loads for new TNT dramas during the upfront, but "I want to do it across the board," said Reilly, who said the approach "has been embraced by the advertising community. That said, "we can not go it alone," he said, and if other networks don't follow suit with similar ad load reductions, "we're going to have to go back." For now, his shows have shorter breaks, instead of fewer breaks, but "we're still playing with that," said Reilly. Beyond the reduced ad loads, Reilly said "some of our native advertising efforts have really been great." He cited Maya Rudolph's "vajingle" spot for Seventh Generation tampons on Full Frontal with Samantha Bee, which went viral after it aired last month. "I heard from women, 'that's finally the way those things should be sold,'" said Reilly.

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Why You Likely Won’t See Too Much Political Advertising During the Olympics

July 29, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With the torch about to be lit at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, all eyes are on NBC. And with the TV-friendly time zone—Rio is only an hour ahead of the East Coast—NBC is looking to set records for viewership and advertising dollars. But even as NBC is looking at a bigger haul for ad revenue than it had in 2012—in March, the network surpassed $1 billion in national broadcast, cable and digital sales, four months earlier than it did four years ago—don't expect an onslaught of campaign ads from Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump. Unless, that is, you happen to live in one of the 10 to 14 swing states that will likely determine which party wins the White House this year. It would seem that the massive audience the Olympics provides—NBC drew more than 217 million viewers over the 17 days of the 2012 London Games, including an average of 31 million per night in prime time—would be an ideal chance for candidates to get their messages out. But with only so many political dollars to go around—Borrell Associates projected north of $11 billion in political advertising for the 2016 cycle—campaigns value efficiency over audience size, especially with all the ways available to reach voters, many of which didn't exist just four years ago. "[Voter groups] can be found and targeted in way more efficient ways," said Lenny Stern, co-founder and CEO of SS+K, the agency behind youth vote campaigns for Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012. Thanks largely to technology, marketers today have better ways to directly target specific audience segments rather than casting a wide, pricey net. The average cost for a 30-second spot for Rio is $100,000, Kantar Media estimates, which would be a slight increase over the previous two Summer Olympics. But for prime time, that price could be as high as $1 million, according to The Wall Street Journal. "Finding voters in Virginia, Ohio, Florida or Wisconsin in the most efficient way is much more important than some scaled, amazing platform that grabs a lot of eyeballs," Stern argued. The 2016 presidential election is anything but typical; you would have to be living under a rock, that was living under another rock, to not be familiar with the two candidates. After all, one is a former first lady, and the other is a reality TV star. "You're not introducing [voters] to new people," Stern said. "Here, you're really trying to target … people who are your supporters, or who are persuadable." Campaign money swings into battleground states Election ad dollars may not flow heavily on a national level—political advertising accounted for just 1 percent of all commercial inventory during the London Games—because for many campaigns, that spending occurs at the local station level. "You also bring into play on the Senate, House and local races," said Jon Swallen, CRO at Kantar Media. "There is a bigger pool of political advertising." Kantar found that in 2012, the spending was much higher in key battleground markets than in non-battleground states. Political ads only accounted for 1.5 percent of all local station inventory during the games. For example, political ads took up 38 percent of Reno, Nev., NBC affiliate KRNV's inventory.

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CBS Spins Off Carpool Karaoke Into Its Own Series, on Apple Music

July 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The Late Late Show with James Corden wasn't kidding about trying to beat Spike's new rival series (also combining cars and karaoke) to the punch. Today, CBS Television Studios announced that Apple Music had landed global rights to Carpool Karaoke, a series based on the wildly popular segment from The Late Late Show. It will be created and produced by Corden and Late Late Show executive producer Ben Winston. The weekly series will consist of 16 episodes, in which celebrities ride along with the host and "visit places meaningful to the celebrity," according to the release. A host (which is very unlikely to be Corden) and premiere date will be announced later. CBS said Carpool Karaoke will also continue as a recurring segment on The Late Late Show. Apple Music is available in more than 100 countries. The service, which gives subscribers access to more than 30 million songs, costs $9.99 per month. While the show is obviously a good fit for Apple Music, it's still surprising that CBS didn't put the series on its own fledgling streaming service, CBS All Access. Executive producers had initially been dismissive of efforts to spin off Carpool Karaoke, as The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon had done with Lip Sync Battle on Spike

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Despite Streaming Options, Millennial Women Plan to Watch the Olympics on TV

July 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The 2016 Summer Olympics are just a few weeks away, and it looks like the TV-friendly time zone of the host city, Rio de Janeiro, will pay big dividends for NBC. With Rio just one hour ahead of the East Coast, NBC Sports executives have consistently said these games will feature the most live coverage for any Olympics that NBC has been a part of. Despite the digitally-charged media ecosystem that NBC finds itself entrenched in—for the third Olympics in row, NBC will offer every event outside of the opening ceremonies live for digital consumption— it appears that at least one audience demographic is ready to watch the games the old fashioned way, and it's not one most would've expected. Influenster , whose 2 million members are comprised mostly of millennial women, surveyed 3,992 women around the age of 25 to find out their viewing habits for the upcoming games. The product discovery and reviews platform found that the overwhelming majority of millennial women that plan to watch the Olympics will do so in front of the television (75 percent) instead of livestreaming the competition (18 percent). Overall, more than half (54 percent) of millennial women surveyed are planning to watch any coverage from Rio. Airing on a tape delay hasn't hampered NBC's ability to pull in gigantic ratings—NBC averaged north of 30 million viewers for its primetime coverage from London in 2012. In fact, Jim Bell, NBC's executive producer for its Olympics coverage, has argued that the decision to make every sport live on a digital platform has actually increased TV viewership. "By providing more content you got more viewers and more interest, it was the rising tide that lifted all boats," he said during a Paley Center for Media event last month. But for NBC, being able to have big-ticket Olympic sports like swimming, diving, track and field, beach volleyball and gymnastics airing in the moment instead of on a delay should only further boost viewership. It should come as no surprise then that many of the American athletes that millennial women are most aware of, or at least the ones they follow on social media, participate in those major events. Of the 57 percent of those who took part in the survey, Michael Phelps (15 percent) and Gabby Douglas (14 percent) were the top two U.S. athletes followed

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The Return of ‘Stephen Colbert’ and Jon Stewart Gives Late Show a Ratings Boost

July 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

CBS had hoped that its decision to broadcast The Late Show with Stephen Colbert live during both political convention weeks would give the show the boost in ratings and buzz that it's been seeking for months. Last night, the return of two longtime Comedy Central pals—his Colbert Report alter ego and Jon Stewart—helped the program do just that. Monday night's Late Show live broadcast beat its competitors in the 56 overnight metered markets with a 2.1 rating, its best overnight household rating since May 10. That put it ahead of The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon (2.0) and Jimmy Kimmel Live (1.5). Late Show, which is broadcasting live during both political conventions, averaged a 0.5 rating in the 18-49 demo in the 25 local people meter markets. It was the show's best rating since Feb. 15, but still wasn't enough to overtake The Tonight Show, which had a 0.7. These ratings will be updated later today when national ratings are available. Season to date, Late Show is averaging a 0.62 in 18-49, with 2.8 million viewers overall, which is well behind The Tonight Show (a 1.01 rating and 3.7 million total viewers). Kimmel is in third place with a 0.56 demo rating and 2.4 million total viewers

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Fox Finishes Upfront Sales Strong Thanks to Interest in New Shows Like Lethal Weapon

July 13, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After nursing its wounds during last year's upfront presentation, Fox is in a much more celebratory mood this time around. The Fox Networks Group—which includes Fox, Fox Sports, FX, FXX, National Geographic Channel, Nat Geo Wild and Nat Geo Mundo (but not Fox News Channel)—has wrapped its upfront negotiations with volume increases of around 5 percent in CPM (cost per thousand viewers reached) and gains in the high single-digits to low double-digits, according to a person familiar with negotiations. This is a big reversal from last year's mediocre upfront, where Fox—which had fallen to fourth place in the 18-49 demo despite the arrival of Empire—had CPMs that were down as much as 2 percent below the 2014-15 upfront. Volume had been flat at the time. Fox rebounded slightly this past season to third place among the broadcast networks. For the second upfront, ad sales chief Toby Byrne and his team sold inventory across its entire portfolio (except for Fox News). The group had upfront success with its plans to reduce National Geographic Channel's ad load by up to 50 percent for its new series and specials. Fox had the strongest buyer interest from new fall dramas Lethal Weapon and Pitch, as well as midseason entries 24: Legacy, Star and its revival of Prison Break. Buyers had reacted enthusiastically to almost all of Fox's new shows during May's upfront presentation. The network will premiere all 16 of its fall series during a one-week blitz in September. Fox kicked off the marketing campaign for fall baseball drama Pitch during last night's 87th MLB All-Star Game. ABC finished its upfront sales last week, while CBS and The CW wrapped up their upfront deals on June 27

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