Posts Tagged ‘television’

Gillian Flynn’s ‘Sharp Objects’ Being Developed for TV With Marti Noxon, Jason Blum

July 8, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

“Gone Girl” author Gillian Flynn has yet another adaptation in the pipeline. Her debut novel “Sharp Objects” is being developed as a one-hour serialized drama, with Marti Noxon on board as showrunner and writer and Blumhouse Productions’ Jason Blum and Charles Layton to executive produce. Entertainment One Television will develop and produce, with Flynn serving... Read more

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You Could Get Paid to Watch Netflix

July 7, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If you live in the U.K. or Ireland, you could get paid to watch Netflix for a living. The streaming service put up a job listing seeking a qualified candidate to help out with its recommendations system by watching movies and television shows, The Huffington Post reports . According to Netflix's offical job listing for a tagger, "applicants will be responsible for watching and analyzing films and TV programmes that will be streaming on Netflix in the future. The tagger will deconstruct the films and programmes and describe them using objective tags." The listing goes on to specify that the role will offer flexible hours and would be ideal for those with a background in film or film history, or those with filmmaking experience. Taggers are also among the first to see Netflix original series, such as House of Cards and Orange is the New Black . While there are currently around 40 Taggers worldwide, this is the first time Netflix is recruiting for the position in the U.K. and Ireland, reports The Independent . According to that publication, current taggers include "a mum who speaks fluent Hindi and has worked on several procedural crime shows, a French native and former keyboard player in Stereolab now living in New York who tags French-language content and a film director working on his third feature starring Tim Roth who lives in Mexico City and tags Spanish-language content." "We see ourselves as a match making service, which means that we get to know our members and how they interact with our service,"

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Millennial Women Are not Cutting the Cord

July 7, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

A new report from the Cabletelevision Advertising Bureau says that millennials, women 18-24 in particular, are not cutting the cord as quickly as previously thought. In fact, TV's share of viewing hours grew from 84 to 88 percent in the fourth quarter of 2013 (data in the study was sourced from the Nielsen Cross-Platform Report), from 129 total hours out of

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Telefonica Buys Mediaset Espana’s 22% in DTS-Canal Plus Spain

July 4, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Making good on prexy Cesar Alierta’s promise to drive energetically into the content business, Spain’s giant telco Telefonica has bought up Mediaset Espana’s 22% stake in Distribuidora de Television (DTS), the company behind Canal Plus Spain, the country’s biggest TV operator. Confirming the deal Friday, Mediaset Espana put the purchase price at €295 million ($401.2... Read more

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Does America Now Like Soccer? Yesterday’s Ratings Hint at it

July 2, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Yes, that's it for the U.S. in the World Cup, but we went out with a bang: ESPN boasted its second-highest rating ever for a soccer match with a whopping 9.6 rating (people are all watching this during the middle of the day, so from your boss, shame on you, and, from the networks, thank you). Univision generated a 1.8 (representing 2.4 million viewers). The latter's streaming video didn't crack under the strain of its mammoth viewership (ESPN had a brief outage during the Germany Algeria match two days ago, but that still reached 1.7 million concurrent viewers) with a new high watermark of 1.8 million. It helps Univision's streaming numbers in particular that its digital service is free and unauthenticated ( until midnight , at least). The contest has been a major moment for U.S. soccer fandom, which in recent years hasn't exactly been an area of major focus and concern for marketers. But the 2014 contests have been a huge attention-getter for brands including sponsors like Visa, Coke, Adidas and Sony; and other johnny-come-latelies capitalizing on whatever meme they can attach to their brand at the time of a given game (check out our handy compendium of waffle jokes from yesterday, for example). Ruling the rapid-response promo roost, however, has been ESPN, which started off with an over-the-top Kiefer Sutherland paean to America (never mind that Sutherland is Canadian) and came out yesterday with this gem: The Americans lost, but still: USA! USA! USA! Strictly in terms of TV and digital viewership, of course.

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SAG-AFTRA, Companies Extend Contract Another 24 Hours

July 2, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

For a second day in a row, SAG-AFTRA and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers have agreed to extend the current TV and movie contracts for 24 hours. The deals had been set to expire at midnight tonight. As with Monday night, the union and the producers made the joint announcement less than... Read more

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Community Is Getting Its Six Seasons (No Movie Yet)

June 30, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Well, that was close. Sony's offbeat sitcom Community, canceled at the very last minute by NBC, has been renewed at the very last minute (a few hours before contracts with Sony were set to expire, in fact) by Yahoo Screen . Thirteen episodes of the sitcom will air on Yahoo starting in the fall. At the Digital Content NewFronts this year, companies like Yahoo, YouTube and Crackle were voluble about a commitment to premium content; now Yahoo, at least, will be able to say that, like Netflix, it has a sitcom with huge cult appeal (albeit some very low live viewership ) and, unlike Netflix, it's selling ad inventory against that show. Community essentially lived on goodwill and fandom for five years on NBC; after two consecutive half-season orders (during which time the network inexplicably pitted the geeky comedy against the Death Star of geeky comedies, CBS's unbeatable nerdfest The Big Bang Theory), NBC president Bob Greenblatt finally pulled the plug. Showrunner and creator Dan Harmon was initially blas

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This Shark Week Teaser Is a Chum-Tossing Celebration of Carnivorous Delights

June 30, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just watching Discovery's Shark Week will make you feel like you're skiing on two great whites while a mermaid clings to your leg. Behold the resplendent CGI overkill of this internally produced Discovery Channel spot, featuring different kinds of sharks leaping around our chum-tossing "King of Summer." You’ll have to watch two or three times to catch all that's happening as he drives his great whites into a sea of seals, seagull snacks and fleeing penguins. The mustachioed hero basks in the carnage, a look of unadulterated glee on his face. And then the mermaid winks at us. It is cheesy for the sake of cheese, and it's blood in the water for Shark Week fans.

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Denis Leary Returns to FX With Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll

June 30, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Nearly three years after the conclusion of Rescue Me, Denis Leary is returning to FX. Eric Schrier and Nick Grab, the presidents of original programming at FX Networks and FX Productions, said today that the network had ordered 10 episodes of a new series created by and starring Leary called Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll. The show will be produced by FX Productions and Fox Television Studios and will premiere in 2015. Leary and Jim Serpico will executive produce, in partnership with their production company Apostle . SDRR will center around a washed-up rock star named Johnny Rock (Leary), who, 25 years after wrecking his and his best friend’s music career by overindulging in the usual slate of vices—booze, drugs, sex with the wrong people—is attempting to reunite his band, called the Heathens. The series also will star John Corbett, Elizabeth Gillies, Elaine Hendrix and Bobby Kelly. The pilot episode was written by Leary and directed by Michael Blieden. “As both actor and writer, Denis plunges into dazzlingly original arenas of dark comedy and, along with a stellar veteran cast, the results are just really funny,” said David Madden, president of Fox Television Studios. SDRR is one of several half-hour pilots that FX currently has in the works. According to the Hollywood Reporter , others include Charlie Kaufman’s How and Why, Simon Rich’s The Last Girlfriend on Earth, an untitled Zach Galifianakis and Louis C.K. entry and an animated show called Bigfoot.

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With Broadcast Volume Down, TV Inventory Is Going to Get Expensive

June 29, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If everybody waits out this upfront for better inventory in the fall, will anybody get enough of it? Brian Wieser, analyst at Pivotal Research (and a former head forecaster for Magna Global), said he’s predicting volume decreases on the order of between 5 percent and 10 percent across what was a $9.25 billion upfront bazaar last year (where networks saw strong interest in upfront commitments), which was followed by a weak season. That puts the upfront haul (which is, of course, largely theoretical anyway—clients can cancel up to 25 percent of their commitments) comfortably south of the $9 billion mark. But it also means more of the real buying will get done after the season’s hits are established, and at a hefty markup. “Scatter is going to be pricey,” said one network exec flatly. Don’t confuse this talk with the CPM gains networks tout during the upfront —those can be valuable, but they can also be a smokescreen when dollar volume is down. “We’ve had a couple of years where it seems like all of the scatter business was pushed into the upfront markets, and that, surprisingly, continued into last year from the year before,” explained Wieser. “Because [the trend] didn’t break last year, we had virtually no volume in the scatter market [since new shows couldn’t deliver the ratings].” Clients, Wieser said, are asking themselves why they’re putting so much money down in the upfront when that money just gets redistributed at midseason to atone for underdeliveries. Why not hold back that money and spend it when it’s clear what the hits are, rather than have money languish at a network where your customers aren’t watching? Well, buyers are about to find out whether or not the trade-off—better shows for higher prices—is worth it. “‘Why don’t we look to see what pops up in the middle of the year and whose seasons are strongest?’” Wieser asked rhetorically. The glum ratio of hits to misses isn’t new—even the networks themselves joke about how bad it is—so if you don’t have to lock in your buys, why bother? But if every advertiser decides that this is the season to cut back on upfront budgets and put the remaining cash into scatter inventory on the season’s established hits, scatter pricing is going to go through the roof.

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