Posts Tagged ‘television’

CBS Exec Steve Capus Discusses the Evolution of the Evening News

August 31, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

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No Less Than 5 Shows Inspired by Sherlock Holmes Find Homes on TV

August 31, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

A shadowy cabal of influential media barons went to war with a lone mastermind earlier this year in the court. This, of course, was the legal battle between Sherlockian Leslie S. Klinger and the estate of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, which tried to argue that, more than 100 years after the first Sherlock Holmes story was published, Holmes had not yet passed into the public domain because not every story starring him had been written yet by Doyle. The estate's licensing strategy was a novel one: demand licensing fees. And if the demandee pointed out that the character was more than 100 years old and thus in the public domain, threaten to sue. In his ruling, 7th Circuit judge Richard Posner said not just that the estate was in the wrong but that Klinger had performed "a public service" by fighting the Doyle estate's lawsuit and awarded Klinger some $30,000 in court fees. But the television world has long made a habit of creating almost-Sherlock versions of Doyle's famous consulting detective; so many that the abrasive, crime-solving para-cop genius trope is all over the TV dial—and, a little surprisingly, it remains popular in several different contemporaneous versions. Sometimes showrunners perform genre reassignment surgery on the fabled detective and his various pals: make irascible, drug-addicted Holmes a doctor, change his name so it's a synonym for its homophone, and instead of Holmes and Watson you have House and Wilson.

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Eight O’Clock Coffee Is Bringing to Life the Central Perk Coffee Shop From Friends

August 29, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Rejoice, Friends enthusiasts! Your dream of sipping coffee at the iconic Central Perk will soon become a reality. It's been 20 years since Ross, Phoebe, Monica, Joey, Chandler and Rachel first graced our TV screens, and the love for the gang remains strong, if all of the people on my Facebook feed are to be trusted. To celebrate two decades of shouting "Pivot!" every time a friend announces he's moving, Warner Bros. Television Group, Warner Bros. Consumer Products and Eight O'Clock Coffee are partnering to create a Central Perk pop-up in Manhattan. It'll be short-lived—the shop, created with help from agency Source Marketing, will open Sept. 17 at the corner of Lafayette and Broome Streets, and close Oct. 18—but fans can hang out on the weird orange couch, listen to a rendition of Smelly Cat, see some special guests (Gunther will be there) and maybe, I don't know, try to figure out how Rachel afforded to live in a sprawling Manhattan apartment on a barista's salary. It's a brilliant partnership for Eight O'Clock, which will also be adding a special Central Perk blend to its coffee line next month, if you want to K-Cup your way to a Friends-in-your-travel-mug experience.

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Adrien Brody Has No Time for Your Facebook Friend Request

August 28, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

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Canada Getting New Video Streaming Service

August 26, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Two of Canada’s largest cable television companies are putting their differences aside and joining forces to launch a new video streaming service as the industry responds in kind to competition from online players such as Netflix. The new service, called shomi (pronounced: show me), will debut in November at a suggested retail price of $8.99 (Canadian) a month. It will be available on tablet, mobile, online, Xbox 360 and set top boxes, to Rogers and Shaw Internet and television customers. Shomi will feature prior seasons of popular television shows, as well as iconic series from the past, cult classics and fan favorite films, the two companies said in a statement. At launch, the shomi catalog will contain 11,000 hours of television shows and 1,200 movies; 30 percent of the content will be Canadian. Shomi has exclusive past-season streaming rights to a number of popular titles, including Modern Family, Sons of Anarchy, Sleepy Hollow, Vikings, New Girl, 24: Live Another Day, Chicago Fire, The Strain and American Horror Story. "We've taken the time to talk with Canadians to find out what they want and to create an unbelievable user experience," said Rogers Media president Keith Pelley. "They told us loud and clear—they want all the past seasons of the most popular, current TV shows and they want it to be easy. Shomi takes the guesswork out of finding what to watch, acting like a new-age video clerk serving up all the best content based on individual viewing habits." Netflix in particular will prove to be a formidable competitor. Although the company does not disclose how many Canadian customers it has, estimates range as high as 5.8 million. However, there’s one point in shomi’s favor: Netflix Canada’s content is considered inferior to the content available in the United States, a weakness the programmers at shomi could exploit.

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Canada Getting New Video Streaming Service

August 26, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Two of Canada’s largest cable television companies are putting their differences aside and joining forces to launch a new video streaming service as the industry responds in kind to competition from online players such as Netflix. The new service, called shomi (pronounced: show me), will debut in November at a suggested retail price of $8.99 (Canadian) a month. It will be available on tablet, mobile, online, Xbox 360 and set top boxes, to Rogers and Shaw Internet and television customers. Shomi will feature prior seasons of popular television shows, as well as iconic series from the past, cult classics and fan favorite films, the two companies said in a statement. At launch, the shomi catalog will contain 11,000 hours of television shows and 1,200 movies; 30 percent of the content will be Canadian. Shomi has exclusive past-season streaming rights to a number of popular titles, including Modern Family, Sons of Anarchy, Sleepy Hollow, Vikings, New Girl, 24: Live Another Day, Chicago Fire, The Strain and American Horror Story. "We've taken the time to talk with Canadians to find out what they want and to create an unbelievable user experience," said Rogers Media president Keith Pelley. "They told us loud and clear—they want all the past seasons of the most popular, current TV shows and they want it to be easy. Shomi takes the guesswork out of finding what to watch, acting like a new-age video clerk serving up all the best content based on individual viewing habits." Netflix in particular will prove to be a formidable competitor. Although the company does not disclose how many Canadian customers it has, estimates range as high as 5.8 million. However, there’s one point in shomi’s favor: Netflix Canada’s content is considered inferior to the content available in the United States, a weakness the programmers at shomi could exploit.

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Emmy Advertisers Branch Out

August 25, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With the 66th Annual Emmy Awards airing tonight on NBC, advertisers are seeing the value in not just the air time, but in the social media opportunities that surround major live events such as this one. Part of the appeal is that most viewers watch these events on live television—instead of recording them on DVR boxes for later viewing—so they are more likely to actually see the commercials, rather than skip over them. And viewers of this type of event programming are usually engaged in talking about both the show—and the commercials—on Twitter and Facebook, reported The New York Times . One advertiser betting big on the event is Audi , who is the official automotive sponsor of the Television Academy for the fourth year in a row. According to Kantar Media, Audi was last year’s biggest Emmy advertiser, with a spend of $3.98 million, followed by Target at $3.48 million; Samsung at $2.99 million; Discover at $1.99 million; and Sony Pictures at $1.24 million. “Audi is thrilled to be returning as a sponsor,” said Loren Angelo, director of marketing, Audi of America, in a statement. “We look forward to honoring Hollywood’s brightest stars and introducing the all-new Audi Q3, demonstrating the brand’s devotion to style, technology and performance on television’s biggest night.” Audi started its campaign early, with a video featuring three past Emmy winners —Bryan Cranston, Aaron Paul and Julia Louis-Dreyfus—in a humorous spot that helped generate pre-Emmy buzz. It also began airing its #OffScript series of videos featuring Emmy-nominee Fred Armisen highlighting the Audi Q3 and encouraging viewers to tune into the awards. “Audi knows the importance of event-driven premium video programming and connecting that with the content we created specifically for real-time social integrations on the day of the Emmy Awards drives very powerful viewer engagement,” said Sari Feinberg, svp of client solutions and advertising sales at NBCUniversal. “This partnership reflects our commitment to deliver a comprehensive creative experience so our advertisers can reach our diverse audiences across all platforms in a meaningful way.” L’Oreal Paris is another advertiser planning to take advantage of the opportunities around pre-and post-awards coverage on NBC and sister network E!. The svp for marketing of the L’Oreal Paris division of L’Oreal USA, Malena Higuera, noted that the company plans to have a “significant presence” across all of the platforms, including television spots, social media and digital platforms like YouTube. “We have been advertising around the Emmys for 10 years,” Higuera said

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TV Gets Undressed

August 24, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

To say that this wedding is unconventional doesn’t quite capture the essence of the nuptials of reality show contestants Ashley and Alika. First off, the bride and groom met with the TV cameras rolling and decided to get hitched after just three months. Six other couples who are attending the wedding fell for each other under the same televised circumstances. A shaman presides over the ceremony, with backup from a chanting yogi and drum circle. Nowhere in sight can one find the usual trappings—no flower girl, no ring bearer, no tulle or tuxedos. Boutonnieres are also in short supply—though bug spray could come in handy. Some of the invited guests are more anxious than even the happy couple—who, even if they don’t get cold feet, may well experience sunburn. For you see, everybody here—the bride and groom, wedding party and guests—is butt naked. Even if you haven’t been tuning into VH1’s summer hit Dating Naked —which has attracted more than 1 million viewers per episode and plenty of social buzz to boot—you might want to cue the DVR for television’s first all-nude wedding, airing Sept. 18 at 9 p.m. To be sure, it’ll be a spectacle not to be missed. For the Viacom-owned basic cable channel, it was a no-brainer to film the union and televise it as an hour-long special, extending the series’ 10-episode run with what are likely to be big ratings.

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NFL Scores a Touchdown With Female Fans

August 24, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Pop quiz: What was the most watched TV event among women in 2014? It wasn’t the Academy Awards. Or the Grammys. Or the season finale of The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills. It was Super Bowl XLVIII, watched by an average of 44.9 million women. Overall, they make up 46 percent of all NFL fans, and an average 63 percent of women 12 and older identify as fans. Despite those numbers, the concept of the “female fan” is still relatively new—at least as far as marketers are concerned. But over the past few years, there’s been a distinct change in the way those women are being spoken to by brands. Gone are the days of “ pink it and shrink it ”; now, women are being treated like the valuable untapped market that they are. “About five years ago, we did an inventory of all our offerings [for women],” said the NFL’s director of apparel Rhiannon Madden. “We had a growing female fanbase who were just as avid as the male fans, but we weren’t giving them the best outlet to express their fandom.” The NFL worked to create more sophisticated offerings for women, like vintage-inspired tees and apparel, more plus-size and juniors apparel, and a full line of women’s-size jerseys. Today, of the 200-plus New York Giants women’s T-shirts available on NFLShop.com , only about 10 are pink—and many of those support breast cancer awareness. Women’s media is also stepping up its game. Marie Claire has been one of the strongest supporters of female NFL fans . Last year, the magazine debuted a 16-page section titled “The Ultimate Fangirl’s Guide to Football,” copies of which were distributed in the style lounges of stadiums

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Hulu’s Jenny Wall Is a Pioneer of the Web Series Form

August 24, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who Jenny Wall New gig Svp, head of marketing at Hulu Old gig Vp, marketing at Netflix Age 44 Photo: Karl J Kaul/Wonderful Machine So how did you find Hulu? I think I found Hulu in the sense that I’d been an avid Hulu user on my own—they called me in respect to some recommendations from the field. The opportunity came to me and I jumped on it immediately, and I’ve been very impressed with Mike [ Hopkins, Hulu’s new CEO ]. You’ve worked at some great places that have huge presences digitally, like HBO and Netflix. How have you seen the market change? I think the biggest thing I’ve seen is that it’s not considered “Internet TV” anymore. It’s really just entertainment you consume in a particular manner. Internet television is what we called it two years ago—everybody expected things to be Internet quality, but I had the opportunity to work on House of Cards and it was similar to what happened with HBO. And things snowballed. It took an example to show the public that something delivered through the Internet could be of high quality. It was amazing to be at HBO in those days, too, when the Sopranos and Sex and the City began. I’ve been lucky to land at two great places and now a third. How do you get the kind of reach on digital that TV enjoys? We have incredible content now that we maybe haven’t talked about as loudly as we should. Looking back at House of Cards, it was an incredibly well-produced show, it was a serialized drama, it was unlike short-form Web content.

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