Posts Tagged ‘television’

Broadcast TV Is Still Outpacing Netflix’s Top Shows by Millions of Viewers Per Episode

January 21, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Hit streaming shows on Netflix and Amazon may seem to be pulling huge audiences, but they're still lagging far behind TV's top programs, according to data obtained exclusively by Adweek. Multiplatform measurement firm Symphony Advanced Media—whose data was recently used by NBC as evidence the network was staying well ahead of Netflix—has released a new round of viewership stats showing the biggest shows in streaming still don't measure up to broadcast's top series. Symphony's VideoPulse measurement tool looked at the average 18- to 49-year-old audience per episode within the first 35 days of broadcast, and includes DVR, on-demand and streaming data in addition to live viewing. While some of this data was shared by NBCU ratings guru Alan Wurtzel last week , the data released today offers a more complete picture of the 18-49 audience last fall per episode on Netflix, Hulu, Amazon and Crackle's original series. Here's how many people watched each episode of top streaming shows over a 35-day period this past fall, according to Symphony: Marvel's Jessica Jones (Netflix): 4.81 million* Master of None (Netflix): 3.92 million Narcos (Netflix): 3.21 million** The Man in the High Castle (Amazon): 2.12 million* Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp (Netflix): 832,000** Transparent (Amazon): 653,000*** Orange is the New Black (Netflix): 644,000** Hemlock Grove (Netflix): 597,000 Dinotrux (Netflix): 534,000** Casual (Hulu, ongoing series): 491,000 The Hotwives of Las Vegas (Hulu, ongoing series): 336,000 Longmire (Netflix): 139,000 The Art of More (Crackle): 80,000* Bojack Horseman (Netflix): 64,000** Project Mc2 (Netflix): 42,000** * These titles were released later in fall, so the measurement reflects between 31 and 35 days of viewing. ** These titles were released before Sept. 1, when Symphony's measurement began, so the data reflects viewing between Sept. 1 and Oct. 6. *** Measurement only includes 21 days of episode 1 (released Nov. 30), and 10 days for the other nine episodes (released on Dec. 11). Symphony's data shows the continued resilience of Netflix's summer hits like Wet Hot American Summer and Orange is the New Black, which outrated "new" Hulu programming, even though they premiered months earlier. Narcos premiered Aug. 28, just a few days before VideoPulse's measurement began

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From Reducing Ad Loads to Declaring War on Netflix, Here’s How the TV Industry Is Gearing Up for 2016

January 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The broadcast and cable networks, along with streaming services like Netflix, Hulu and Amazon, have spent the past two weeks at the Television Critics Association's winter press tour, sharing their plans for midseason and beyond. (You can find all of Adweek's TCA coverage here .) In addition to trotting out the new shows they hope will connect with audiences, the networks also addressed the industry's larger issues—chiefly, how to stay relevant in a dramatically-shifting landscape—and how to solve them. Here are the five biggest takeaways from the TCA winter press tour, and the most significant ways the industry will change this year: 1. Reducing ad loads to entice and keep viewers. "TV is the best advertising delivery mechanism ever invented. It's unparalleled for building brands and moving consumers, but we have overstuffed the bird" and diluted the effectiveness of ads, said Kevin Reilly, president of TNT and TBS, and chief creative officer of Turner Entertainment. That's why as part of his dramatic overhaul of TNT and TBS, Reilly is going to reduce the ad load on TNT's three new dramas this year by more than half , which will add eight to 10 minutes of program time per hour. (Turner is pursuing a similar strategy for truTV .) Fewer, more effective ads are essential to "create a better viewing experience," Reilly said. And if networks want to keep audiences from flocking to Netflix, reducing their "overstuffed" ad load is a solid first step. 2. The best way to make a series premiere stand out: Drop the ads. Sensing a trend here? Sometimes reducing ads isn't enough: Some networks are eliminating them altogether in order to make a splash of their series premieres. Syfy led the charge with The Magicians debut last month , and at least one other network is following suit. WGN America will premiere its next two series—Outsiders on Jan. 26, and Underground on March 9—without ads. "In today's competitive landscape, we felt it was important for viewers to get as pure and as uninterrupted an introduction to these worlds as possible," said Matt Cherniss, president and GM for WGN America and Tribune Studios. 3. Even more TV is on the way—for at least one more year. A record 412 scripted series aired last year , along with an additional 750 unscripted series.

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Netflix Returns Fire, Says NBC Has ‘Remarkably Inaccurate Data’ and 18-49 Demo ‘Means Nothing’

January 17, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Netflix has kept its ratings metrics under lock and key for several years, refusing to share that data even with the creators of its own original series. So predictably, the streaming service was none too thrilled last week when NBC shared Netflix ratings data from Symphony Advanced Media , which measured the 18-49 demographic of each Netflix episode released last fall. Ted Sarandos, Netflix's chief content officer, returned fire today as he spoke at the Television Critics Association's winter press tour and blasted the "remarkably inaccurate data" from NBC and Symphony. "The methodology and the measurement and the data itself doesn't reflect any sense of reality of anything that we keep track of," said Sarandos, who noted that the 18-49 demographic that Symphony measured "is so insignificant to us that I can't even tell you how many 18-49 year old members we have. …It's an advertising-driven demographic that means nothing to Netflix." Sarandos took a shot at NBC, which in addition to releasing that data said that Netflix doesn't yet pose a "consistent" threat to broadcasters . "Why would NBC use their lunch slot with you to talk about our ratings? Maybe because it's more fun than talking about NBC ratings!" said Sarandos of NBC, which is comfortably leading all networks in adults 18-49. "There is not an apples to apples comparison to Netflix watching and any reported Nielsen rating," said Sarandos, though as usual, he declined to give any specific metrics. "I do think that once we give a number for a show, then every number will be benchmarked off of that show," he said , explaining that some Netflix series are "built for 2 million people" while others are "built for 30 million…that puts a lot of creative pressure on the talent that we don't want to." However, Netflix did make an exception to its "no ratings" mantra by recently sharing some metrics about its original movies Beasts of No Nation and The Ridiculous Six. "A movie with no box office is different than a show with no TV ratings," Sarandos said. "We also wanted to give some people some sense that the investment was making sense." About the only data that Sarandos would provide about Netflix viewing: "somewhere in the world, every second of every day, someone is pushing play to start a Netflix original show." Netflix will spend $6 billion on content in 2016, a figure which covers both original and acquired series, and offer "more than 600 hours of new, high quality original content," said Sarandos. That includes returning shows Marvel's Daredevil (Season 2 debuts March 18) Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt (April 15), Grace & Frankie (May 6), Orange is the New Black (June 17). Additionally, Netflix announced today that Marvel's Jessica Jones has been picked up for a second season. Netflix is also rolling out several new series—including Will Arnett comedy Flaked (premiering March 11), Ashton Kutcher comedy The Ranch (April 1), French drama Marseille (May 5) and Baz Luhrmann's music drama The Get Down (Aug. 12)‚ while also "doubling down" on kids and family series, launching 20 more of those this year. Despite that overwhelming volume of original content, "we don't think there's too much TV. And if there is too much TV, someone else is going to have to slow down, because we have big plans for 2016 and beyond," said Sarandos. And even as it has accelerated its output, "we don't think we've sacrificed an ounce of quality." Netflix, which is now available in 190 countries, said it thinks globally, not domestically.

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After a Whirlwind 2015, Caitlyn Jenner Has Big Plans for the Second Season of I Am Cait

January 15, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It was a whirlwind 2015 for Caitlyn Jenner, who made a huge splash with her announcement— on the cover of Vanity Fair —that she had transitioned from male to female. But now that the hoopla around her new life is starting to die down, Jenner is continuing her work to raise awareness of transgender issues. That's why she filmed another season of her E! reality show, I Am Cait, which debuts Sunday, March 6. Jenner spoke to reporters at the Television Critics Association's winter press tour about her huge year and what's in store for Season 2. I Am Cait was the No. 1 unscripted cable series launch among adults ages 18 to 49 last year. While ratings cooled later in the season, E! has brought the show back for another season. This year, Jenner will embark on a cross-country trip with her posse of transgender female friends, including Candis Cayne and 19-year-old Ella Giselle. "I really felt like we opened up this conversation that it's okay to talk about trans issues," Jenner said. "But in opening it up, there are so many issues in this community that we really need to deal with and to talk about in the future. And that's what Season 2 is." That theme is echoed in the trailer for I Am Cait's second season, which proclaims, "Last year, she changed her life. This year, she'll live it." In the trailer, Jenner admits, "Sometimes, I feel like I'm throwing old Bruce out the door. Maybe he didn't deserve to be … gone." Later, when asked if she considers herself to be a lesbian now, she said, "I don't see dating women in the future. I've been there, done that." During her high-profile transition last year, Jenner said she made plenty of missteps. "I am not a spokesman for this community," she said. "I am only a spokesman for me and my story.

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NBC Expects Another Billion-Dollar Olympics in Terms of Ad Sales

January 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It might not be the Powerball jackpot, but NBC has been raking in the money for the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. Seven months before the opening ceremony, NBC Sports' ad sales chief Seth Winter said the network is ahead of where it was at this time four years ago before the London games. But it wasn't always looking that way. "A couple months ago, we were behind London," Winter told reporters today on a conference call. In the past few weeks, Winter said, they closed "a couple" of significant pieces of business in the $25 million to $50 million range, and now he expects to top the more than $1 billion in national ad sales for the London games.

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Here’s How Mr. Robot Plans to Top Itself in Season 2

January 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After shaking up the television landscape last summer with Mr. Robot, USA now has the daunting task of trying to top itself when the series returns for Season 2 this summer. Before production began on 2015's best new series , the show's stars and creator Sam Esmail assembled at the Television Critics Association's winter press tour today to talk about what is in store for Elliot (Rami Malek) and the other characters next season. "We could not be more proud of Mr. Robot," said Chris McCumber, president of USA Network. "This was a big week for the series," which won two Golden Globes on Sunday , for best drama and best supporting actor (Christian Slater). "The series struck a chord with fans that no television show has done in a while. From the moment we saw the pilot, we knew we had something special." Now Esmail's challenge is to keep that momentum going in Season 2, which will address the fallout from the big twists involving Malek and Slater's characters. "The whole show has been about Elliot's emotional journey, and I really wanted to focus on that and make it less about the plot. For me, the headline for Season 2 is: how do these two guys reconcile? How does Elliot reconcile with the fact that he's just seeing this fantasy? So that's the struggle that is going to take over in Season 2," said Esmail.

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Turner Says the Post-Millennial Generation Should Be Known as ‘Plurals’

January 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Millennials are quickly becoming yesterday's news, and media companies are trying to figure out just what to call the next generation. Becomers? Founders? iGen? Post-Millennials? Those are just a few. And now Turner has another: Plurals. So how does Turner describe Plurals? They are born after 1997. They are the most diverse generation in U.S. history.

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Step Aside, Cord Cutters and Cord-Nevers. Showtime Is Targeting ‘Cord Cobblers’

January 13, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

We've heard about cord cutters, cord shavers and cord-nevers . Now, Showtime has a new term to add to the growing vernacular: cord cobblers. That's how Showtime's president and CEO, David Nevins, referred to his subscribers while discussing the evolution of his premium cable network at the Television Critics Association's winter press tour. "2016 is going to be the year of customized viewing," Nevins said. "Today's audiences are cord cobblers, individuals and households who creatively manage their content consumption with an assortment of subscriptions that work uniquely for their needs." Because of the availability of its stand-alone streaming service on iTunes, Roku and Android devices, and as add-on subscriptions for Hulu, Amazon Prime and PlayStation Vue, Showtime has "availability and visibility wherever those cord cobblers reside," he said.

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How Hulu Is Helping Shows Like Dawson’s Creek and Melrose Place Find New Audiences

January 9, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

While most outlets are using their time at Television Critics Association's winter press tour to focus on upcoming shows, Hulu took a different approach to part of its presentation: showing how the streaming service has helped bring new audiences to beloved series of the past. "We've signed a multi-year agreement with Sony, which is going to bring a tremendous lineup of programming, including all episodes of series like The Shield, Party of Five, Dawson's Creek and a vast movie library to Hulu," said svp of content Craig Erwich. Also included in the deal: Damages and Happy Endings . Several TV creators who have shows streaming on Hulu talked about how subscription video on demand (SVOD) services are giving their projects new life—and a new revenue stream. "We're excited about the fact that new audiences are discovering our shows," said Darren Star, creator of '90s hit programs Beverly Hills, 90210 and Melrose Place. As for the financial benefits of appearing on Hulu, Star said he's not making anywhere near the estimated $180 million that Hulu paid to secure SVOD rights to Seinfeld last spring. "There's an income stream, but I read that Seinfeld story , I was like, wait a second, that's a lot of money! I'm not sure that's happening here," said Star.

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Despite Losing Mad Men and Breaking Bad, AMC Is More Popular Than Ever

January 9, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

AMC's president and general manager, Charlie Collier, knows that many competitors and onlookers were expecting his network to stumble after losing its two signature shows—Mad Men and Breaking Bad—in a year. But instead of imploding, AMC has just wrapped its most successful year ever. "We faced an important transition over the last two years, with both Breaking Bad and Mad Men coming to a close, and many looked at 2015 as a sort of, what's next here for the network? And we're very proud of what we've accomplished," Collier said at the Television Critics Association's winter press tour. Before presenting the network's upcoming new shows for 2016, Collier noted that three of AMC's four premieres in 2015—Fear the Walking Dead, Into the Badlands and Better Call Saul—are the top three cable series launches of all time among adults 18-49 and 25-54. "At a time when many are focused on too much TV or measurement challenges and the impact of time-shifting, it's remarkable that viewership records can even be set anymore," said Collier, who added that AMC also ended last year "as the no. 1 destination for original programming in prime time, including broadcast, averaging nearly 4 million viewers in adults 18-49 and 25-54 all original episodes in live-plus-three." The network also became a top 5 cable network in primetime for the first time, in both the 18-49 and 25-54 demos. AMC has 14 original shows set to roll out this year, Collier noted. "We head into 2016 confident and optimistic about the future, and that's largely because we believe in the vision of the creative talent that's at the heart of our network," said the exec, who has so many shows in the pipeline that he is adding a fourth night of original programming: Tuesdays, alongside Sundays, Mondays and Saturdays. Among AMC's other TCA announcements: Fear the Walking Dead, AMC's Walking Dead prequel, will return on April 10 for Season 2. The 15-episode season will be split in two parts: seven episodes airing in the spring; the remaining eight later in the year

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