Posts Tagged ‘television’

Here Are the TV Shows and Networks People Watch Live Most and Least Often

October 7, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

While broadcast viewers are thought to represent a more traditional TV audience than those watching cable, a new report says they are actually less likely to watch programming live than their cable counterparts, especially if the network in question is The CW. That information comes from TiVo Research's Q2 State of TV report, which was released today. The quarterly report tracks time-shifting using TiVo's Media TRAnalytics data set, which anonymously aggregates set-top box data from more than 2.3 million households including TiVo owners and other cable providers. According to the study, while the vast majority of TV viewing continues to be live, broadcast network prime-time viewing is more likely to be time-shifted than cable programming. Twenty-six percent of broadcast prime-time programming was time-shifted during the second quarter (23 percent overall was watched in the C3 window, from the same day to three days later; the other 3 percent was time-shifted four to seven days). In total day viewing, 20 percent of broadcast programing was time-shifted. For cable prime-time viewing during the quarter, 88 percent was viewed live, with total day viewing even higher at 91 percent. The CW is the most time-shifted of the broadcast networks. Only 56 percent of its viewers watch live in prime time.

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Why Some Broadcast Shows Are Getting Smaller, Cable-Sized Season Orders

September 29, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It was no surprise that NBC gave This Is Us a full-season pickup on Tuesday—after all, the series had the highest-rated 18-49 debut of any new series last week: a 2.8 rating, which soared to a 4.2 in live-plus-3 numbers. But what was a bit unexpected, however, was the length of that full-season order: 18 episodes, instead of the standard 22-episode season for broadcast shows. This Is Us' 18-episode order was music to the ears of its creator Dan Fogelman, who told Adweek that the 22-episode format isn't deal for either that show or his other new fall drama, Fox's Pitch. "At the end of the day, it's NBC's and Fox's call, and you do as many as they want," said Fogelman. "But it's hard, and it's not just about the difficulty of executing it and executing it well, it's also the schedule and the timing. In these particular shows, you want the show to feel big, and have big moments and big reveals. But it's hard to create that many of them, and you don't want the show to feel disappointing." Fogelman is far from the only creator who feels that way. While sitcoms and procedurals are still routinely receiving 22-episode seasons (in some cases, even more episodes than that), increasingly, producers of serialized broadcast dramas are pushing for smaller-cable sized season orders, and their networks are happily complying. "I cannot tell you how much the world has changed in the last decade as far as that goes," said Gary Newman, Fox Television Studios co-CEO and co-chairman. "I think the root of it is, more and more for studios, the back-end is SVOD [services like Netflix and Amazon], not syndication. So you no longer need a certain number of episodes [to hit the threshold for syndication]. You want as many as possible, but you don't need them the way you used to." In a world where as many as 450 scripted series will air this year, "We're no longer competing with just the other broadcast networks. We're competing with OTT services and cable networks, and I think you have to be respectful of the consumers' time and interest," said Newman. That means realizing that "sometimes with these more intense, serialized shows, trying to maintain that intensity over 22 episodes—or as we discovered years ago with 24, 24 episodes—is very difficult," said Newman. "I think if we were to be honest about 24, as great as it was, you would see a lot of dipping, particularly in the middle of the season." 24's 12-episode limited series revival, 2014's 24: Live Another Day, "was a far more successful version. We were able to keep up the intensity throughout the 12 episodes," Newman added

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NBC Takes Over New World Trade Center Station With GIFs Promoting Superstore

September 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

NBC teamed with Giphy for a Superstore GIF installation that operates through Oct. 16. NBC New York commuters who travel through the new World Trade Center transportation hub were met with quite the spectacle today, the debut of a football field-size GIF installation for NBC's sophomore sitcom Superstore. NBC and Giphy partnered on the campaign, which features GIFs of the show's cast, and which the network hopes will appeal to millennials. The network is advertising on all 19 LED displays of a marble-lined corridor in the World Trade Center transportation hub, which opened earlier this year. It's the first entertainment company to appear in the space. The nine most prominent of the 9-by-8-foot panels are devoted to the Superstore installation, with the other 10 featuring more traditional key art for NBC's other shows. "It's about the length of a football field; it's absolutely insane," said Kjerstin Beatty, svp of media at NBC Entertainment. "Customization is everything. That's the way we're able to connect with audiences in a very fragmented world." The network was looking for a different campaign to mark the return of its first successful sitcom in several years. While most series end up advertising in Times Square, "what World Trade Center represented to us was this beautiful, new canvas for us to create something custom and speak to the tech and advertising communities and the very young workforce that's down there," said Beatty.

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FX Will Show America’s Uncomfortable Truths in Its People v. O.J. Followup About Hurricane Katrina

September 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story has been more successful than even FX could have imagined. The miniseries won nine Emmys in all Sunday night, including outstanding limited series, and was watched by an average of 12.6 million people across all platforms. Now FX is shifting its focus to the second season of American Crime Story, which will focus on Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. The decision raised eyebrows when it was first revealed in January, given that the topic would seem to be less palatable to audiences than People v. O.J. was. Yet the network has never wavered in its Katrina plans, says FX Networks CEO John Landgraf, who noted that a 10-episode miniseries focusing on the Simpson trial was met with just as much initial skepticism as Katrina was. Katrina "was our only choice from the very beginning," said Landgraf. "If we're all honest—and I'll be honest on my behalf—when we heard they're going to make something based on The People v. O.J. Simpson, it was like, 'Really? Do we really need that?' Because essentially on its face, what we had is cheesy, self-serving, profit-seeking, poor narrative built around that story. The reason we wanted to do it was that we could see from Jeff Toobin's book and from [Scott] Alexander and [Larry] Karaszewski's scripts and through our producers, that actually it was something much richer and more humane and deeper." Then, after People v.

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The People v. O.J. Simpson, Game of Thrones Dominate 2016 Emmys

September 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On the night before the 2016-17 TV season began, the television industry honored its very best shows and actors at the 68th Emmy Awards—and the broadcast networks once again found themselves dominated by cable and streaming networks. For three hours on ABC, a series of broadcast stars strode onstage at the Microsoft Theater, and more often than not, presented Emmys to HBO's Game of Thrones, FX's The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story, and Amazon's Transparent. Of 27 Emmy awards, just four went to broadcast outlets: Kate McKinnon won for supporting actress in a comedy (NBC's Saturday Night Live), NBC's The Voice was named best reality competition program, Regina King won for supporting actress in a limited series (ABC's American Crime) and Fox's Grease: Live was honored for directing in a variety special. HBO and FX dominated the evening, with 6 Emmys apiece, led by Game of Thrones and The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story. Netflix and Amazon were also well represented (with 3 and 2 awards, respectively), and even BBC America snuck in, as Orphan Black's Tatiana Maslany, who read her acceptance speech via smartphone, was a surprise pick for best actress in a drama series

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ABC’s New President Is Making History, and She’s Focused on Making Waves This Fall

September 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The year 2016 has been a whirlwind for Channing Dungey, who was promoted to ABC Entertainment president in February, succeeding Paul Lee. Thrust into the job as pilot season was in full swing, Dungey responded by fielding a new lineup for the 2016-17 season that includes two of the most acclaimed new fall shows, Designated Survivor and Speechless, which she hopes will jolt ABC out of fourth place in the 18-49 demo. As she put the finishing touches on the new season, Dungey sat down with Adweek to talk about her first seven months on the job, making history as the first African-American woman to run a broadcast network, and what's next. Adweek: You started this job in the midst of pilot season, in February. Have you had a chance to take a breath yet? Channing Dungey: I feel like you have go through the whole cycle one time in a new role to really feel like you understand all of it. The television business has ebbs and flows, so I did get away for a week with my family and my parents and my sister, to have a little beach vacation. But for the most part, I've been really boots on the ground, wanting to take everything in as I go through this first cycle. What have these seven months on the job been like for you? They've been good. I have a fantastic team of people with whom I work. I'm very excited about that

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Chuck Todd on Why Donald Trump Probably Won’t Skip the Presidential Debates

September 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The longest-running show on American television is having a moment, once again. NBC's Meet the Press is beginning its new season with a formula that hasn't changed much since it debuted on Nov. 6, 1947: A moderator interviews a newsmaker, usually a politician or candidate, followed by a discussion of the top political and policy issues of the day. These days the moderator is Chuck Todd, a political wonk who got his start in politics briefly working for the 1992 presidential campaign of Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa). "Basically, I was the runner to go to the bank to deposit checks," he explained. After 15 years at National Journal's The Hotline, including six as editor in chief, the late Tim Russert recruited Todd to NBC as political director.

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Stephen Colbert, Kelly Ripa and Other TV Stars Recall Their Most Memorable Commercials

September 7, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Many of fall TV's biggest stars have one thing in common: They appeared in commercials early (and sometimes, not-so-early) in their career as they tried to break into Hollywood. Earlier this year, several television actors shared their wildest commercial stories with Adweek; now with the fall season approaching, a new group of TV personalities looked back on the ads they appeared in that made them laugh, cry—and choke. Stephen Colbert, Wonderful Pistachios For his 2014 Super Bowl ad, The Late Show host—who was still on The Colbert Report at the time—pitched Wonderful Pistachios on the concept of cracking his own head open, pistachio-style. "They said, 'It has to be something startling, and we need you to be really enthusiastic about the pistachio.' I said, 'Well, what if I am just a pistachio?' They said, 'We like it. Are you okay with an eagle?' I'm like, 'Sure, that's fine,'" said Colbert. Between his "normal" face, his face covered in green makeup, a mold of his head, a "puppeted pistachio head" and a digital version, "there were like six different heads, all composited into that one three-second moment," said Colbert. "Star Wars did not have more render time than what happened to my head [in order] to have it be seamless! Everything was extraordinary." But what Colbert remembers most of all is his souvenir from the shoot, from the puppeteers who had also worked on the Lord of the Rings films. "I got a Lord of the Rings crew t-shirt from one of the guys, [made] before any of the graphics had been settled on," said Colbert, who is famously a huge fan of the J.R.R. Tolkien novels and films. "And so I've got a shirt with pre-approved graphics of what the Eye of Sauron was originally like, and what the original font was like. It's my 'precious'!" Kelly Ripa, Burger King The Live with Kelly host was 18 when she landed her first acting job, on a Burger King commercial. "They were testing out a brand new product—this is how long ago this was—called Chicken Tenders. It was their response to the McDonald's Chicken McNugget, and I shot a commercial for them where I had to run down the West Side Highway and break into a dance, because I was eating these Chicken Tenders," said Ripa, laughing. "That was pretty memorable." Kiefer Sutherland, Jose Cuervo In 2013, Sutherland learned the hard way that the alcohol used in liquor ads isn't fake, like it is for his other movie and TV projects.

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Fox Sports Is Banking on Skip Bayless to Be Its ‘Undisputed’ Champ

September 6, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Skip Bayless is considered one of the most articulate, fearless and polarizing figures on sports television today. The sports columnist turned on-air personality gained fame from a partnership with another outspoken figure, Stephen A. Smith, on ESPN2's weekday morning debate program First Take. Bayless, 64, left ESPN and is taking his contrarian viewpoints, including a propensity to bash three-time NBA champion LeBron James and an undying love for ex-NFL quarterback Tim Tebow, to Fox Sports and a new show for FS1 called Skip and Shannon: Undisputed. The program's format mirrors that of First Take, but Bayless gets a new sparring partner in NFL Hall-of-Famer and CBS Sports analyst Shannon Sharpe and a new moderator in FS1 host Joy Taylor. The program will air live on weekday mornings from 9:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. ET. Fox Sports considers the addition of Bayless a coup for the company and believes the news merits a significant multiplatform marketing campaign. Marketing elements for Bayless' arrival include a multimillion-dollar, off-channel media plan including billboards, TV and digital; a digital video stunt in which Bayless and Sharpe debate sports with customers at an L.A. barber shop; a Times Square billboard takeover, which will be up during the series premiere on Tuesday; a social media promotion where fans can tweet at Fox Sports for a chance to win a daily breakfast delivered by GrubHub vendors in local markets; and a 12-foot Skip Bayless bobblehead, which will travel to FS1 college football games across the country this fall. The promotion kicked off Friday at the Kansas State-Stanford game in Palo Alto, Calif.

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ABC Will Air the Oscars Through at Least 2028

August 31, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

ABC remains the only one of the big four broadcast networks shut out of the NFL broadcast business, but it has a lock on its yearly marquee live TV event for the next 12 years. The network and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences have extended their agreement for ABC to broadcast the Academy Awards—which is usually the most-watched entertainment program of the year—through 2028. This is an eight-year extension of the previous ABC/AMPAS deal, which was set to expire in 2020. "We're honored to continue our storied and successful partnership with ABC in broadcasting the most watched live entertainment event of the year," said Academy president Cheryl Boone Isaacs in a statement. "In 2028, we'll mark the Oscars 100th anniversary, and ABC is the perfect partner to help us celebrate the magic of movies with our fans. "After hosting the Academy Awards more than 50 times, ABC has become the home for Hollywood's most prestigious and glamorous night of television," said Ben Sherwood, co-chairman of Disney media networks and president of Disney-ABC Television Group, in a statement. "Broadcast television brings together the biggest audiences with high-quality live events, and ABC has the brightest, boldest lineup in the business." The deal was important for ABC, which doesn't enjoy the ratings bumps that CBS, NBC and Fox receive from broadcasting NFL games each fall or from airing what is always the year's most-watched TV program, the Super Bowl, every three years. Those games help keep those networks on top of the ratings each season, leaving ABC to instead tout its status as No. 1 network for entertainment programming (i.e.

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