Posts Tagged ‘television’

Philippe Dauman Named Executive Chairman of Viacom, As Sumner Redstone Steps Down

February 4, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just 48 hours ago, Sumner Redstone was the executive chairman of both CBS Corp. and Viacom. But now, he has been replaced at both companies. Today, Viacom announced that its president and CEO Philippe Dauman had been named executive chairman, replacing the ailing Redstone, who is 92. Yesterday, CBS Corp. appointed Les Moonves as its chairman , after Redstone had resigned on Feb. 2. Redstone, who vowed never to retire (even going as far to declare that he would never die ), is now chairman emeritus at both companies. The news comes two weeks after Viacom and CBS were sued by a shareholder , who questioned Redstone's mental competence—which led investors to wonder whether Redstone should continue running both companies. "In choosing a successor to Sumner, the board considered the need for seasoned leadership in this time of unprecedented change, Philippe's business experience and unparalleled knowledge of Viacom and his long-term vision for the company," said Viacom board member William Schwartz in a statement. "We believe his becoming executive chairman is in the best interests of the company and all shareholders." Dauman's appointment had been challenged by Redstone's daughter, Shari, who is vice chair of CBS and Viacom. She said in a statement yesterday that while she fully supported Moonves as CBS chairman, "it is my firm belief that whoever may succeed my father as chair at each company should be someone who is not a trustee of my father's trust or otherwise intertwined in Redstone family matters, but rather a leader with an independent voice." That was a slap at Dauman, who was given authority last October to make healthcare decisions for Redstone if he should become incapacitated. Following CBS' lead yesterday, Viacom had initially offered Shari the position of non-executive chairman, but she declined and will remain in her current role. "I am honored to succeed my friend and long-time colleague Sumner in the role of executive chairman. His steadfast belief in our company and the power of entertainment will always be an inspiration for me and I look forward to carrying forward his leadership role as a champion for all shareholders.

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Stephen Colbert on a Possible Late Show Sidekick and Regrowing His ‘Colbeard’

February 3, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When Stephen Colbert sat down with Adweek for his first major interview since starting The Late Show with Stephen Colbert in September , he had a lot to get off his chest. So much, in fact, that it couldn't all fit into this week's cover story about his post-Super Bowl show on Sunday. Yesterday, he talked about how Jon Stewart earns his keep as one of The Late Show's four executive producers . Here are six other bonus elements that weren't able to fit in our cover story. 1.

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How CBS Has Spent the Past Year Trying to Get You to Watch Super Bowl 50

February 3, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When George Schweitzer was researching CBS's coverage of the very first Super Bowl as part of his preparation for the network's Super Bowl 50 marketing campaign, he made note of a Washington Post article from January 1967. "It said in the TV column, 'CBS is pulling out all the stops and promoting this game all over, using their celebrities,'" said Schweitzer. "And I was imagining, what were 'the stops' in 1967?" Whatever they were, they don't come close to the exhaustive, yearlong marketing effort Schweitzer, the president of CBS Marketing Group, and his team have concocted as they try to attract as many viewers as possible for Sunday's Super Bowl telecast. "We were there for the first one in 1967," he said of Super Bowl I, which was jointly televised by CBS and NBC. "Since then, it has really transformed into a national day of celebration." And CBS is hoping the game's 50th year will yield its biggest celebration yet. "This one is very special," said Schweitzer, who is working on his sixth Super Bowl for CBS. "The Super Bowl is the singular biggest event in our culture, in our business, in the mainstream, in everything. It has so many moving parts beyond the game. What we've learned over the years is how to activate all those other moving parts, because it attracts, obviously, people who don't watch a football game all year long." Because of that, CBS didn't waste any time in starting to promote Super Bowl 50. The network rolled out its very first promo last Feb. 2, just one night after NBC aired last year's Super Bowl (which drew 114.4 million viewers), and debuted the network's manta for the coming year: "We were there for the first. We'll be there for the 50th." Adweek responsive video player used on /video. "That was what I would call a 'plant the flag' kind of spot," said Schweitzer. "Once the other one was over, we established CBS immediately as the home of the 50th." Taking his cue from the traditional 50th anniversary color, Schweitzer created a campaign that seemed to bathed in gold. "We've embraced it in a big way," he said, "because we think it helps achieve what we want, which is to turn this into more than the event itself, and make it look like it's very coordinated and cohesive on CBS. And that went from not just the network, but our local stations, our O&O [owned-and-operated] stations, our affiliate stations, our 120 radio stations, all of our online and streaming services. Anything that isn't nailed down around here is part of our gold celebration." For the Super Bowl 50 campaign, the network shot around 40 of CBS's prime-time, news and sports celebrities in various football scenarios and traveled to a smelting plant in California, where it photographed molten gold getting poured into a mold, using that footage for promotion. The gold motif extended to CBS's fall campaign, so= even when the network wasn't specifically promoting the Super Bowl, it retained those promos' key elements. On Dec.

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How Jon Stewart Is Still Making an Impact on Late-Night TV

February 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If you're lamenting Jon Stewart's departure from The Daily Show last August and wishing he was still a presence in late night, your wish has come true. In the end, Stewart's late-night hiatus didn't even last a month: the former host has been an important force on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert, where he serves as one of the show's four executive producers, Colbert told Adweek during his interview for this week's cover story . While Stewart's inclusion as a Late Show executive producer was a surprise reveal on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert's Sept. 8 debut , his exact role on the show had remained unclear, until now. Colbert said Stewart has been a part of his Late Show plans since April 10, 2014, when CBS first revealed that Colbert would leave The Colbert Report and take over the show after David Letterman's retirement. "The minute it was announced that I was going to be the new host, that day, he called me up to congratulate me and I said, 'Thank you. Would you come help with the show and be an executive producer?'" said Colbert. "I had many motivations for that. One is I'm very grateful to Jon for everything I learned from him at The Daily Show and for him putting his weight behind my last show [The Colbert Report] getting on the air and helping us with that show. I wouldn't have this position if it hadn't been for what Jon did for me. So on one level it's gratitude and loyalty to Jon," said Colbert. "But on another level, he's been immensely helpful, because he's also a real consultant. As a matter of fact, the reason this interview started late is that I have not had a moment for him to download his thoughts to me. We were talking about ways to open up the show, how to make it more play, less planned

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Infographic: Do TV Shows Leading Out of the Super Bowl Gain Long-Term Viewers?

February 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With the large, and usually record-setting, audience that tunes into the Super Bowl, the network fortunate enough to air it has a prime opportunity to showcase one of its top shows in the lead-out slot. However, despite the larger-than-usual audiences that tune in right after the game, few actually stick around in the subsequent weeks. In fact, the last three shows to get that plum spot saw slight audience decline from their pre-Super Bowl episode. Infographic: Carlos Monteiro This story first appeared in the Feb. 1 issue of Adweek magazine. Click here to subscribe

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Grease Live Draws 12.2 Million Viewers, Making Fox’s First Live Musical a Hit

February 1, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Fox has chills, and they're multiplying. That's because Grease Live, the network's first foray into the live musical genre that NBC has owned since 2013, was a huge success for the network Sunday night. Grease Live attracted 12.2 million viewers and a 4.3 rating among adults ages 18 to 49, according to preliminary Nielsen numbers. That tops the 11.5 million viewers and 3.4 demo rating for NBC's The Wiz Live in December and comes close to the numbers for NBC's biggest live musical: 2013's The Sound of Music Live, which drew 18.6 million total viewers and a 4.6 rating in the demo. The show was particularly strong among younger viewers, with a 3.7 rating in adults 18-34 and teens. The teen rating was 23 percent higher than Sound of Music's numbers, Fox noted. (While the network has stopped reporting live-plus-same-day ratings , it makes exceptions for live events like Grease.) The ratings are also good news for Coca-Cola, which sponsored Grease Live with period-appropriate integrations and also ran three spots during the show. Grease Live's success is one last win for former Fox chief Kevin Reilly, who green-lit the musical in April 2014, less than two months before he stepped down. "The truth is, Grease was ordered before we came to the network. We were thrilled with it and embraced it," Gary Newman, co-CEO and co-chairman of Fox Television Studios, told Adweek last month. While there were plenty of questions leading up to last night's musical—How would the rainstorm pelting Los Angeles impact the show, part of which was set on the Warner Bros. backlot? Would Vanessa Hudgens, who played Rizzo, be able to carry on after the tragic death of her father a day earlier?—audiences were most dazzled by the technical wizardry of director Thomas Kail, who also helmed the Broadway sensation Hamilton. The show had 1.2 million tweets, with the most-tweeted minute occurring at 8:31 p.m. ET, after Boyz II Men sang "Beauty School Dropout." The most TiVo'd moment came at 9:26 p.m., when Sandy (played by Julianne Hough) stands up for Rizzo, who sings "There are Worse Things I Could Do." In addition to Kail's euphoric camera work, the show was given an energy boost by the inclusion of a live audience, which have not been a part of NBC's musicals. "It's just one of the ideas we are doing to sort of burst open the genre of a live television musical," said executive producer Marc Platt. The production took over two soundstages and half of the Warner Bros. backlot, where the finale's carnival scene took place

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Why FX’s Bizarre New Clown Comedy ‘Baskets’ Is Obsessed With Costco and Arby’s

January 28, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

FX's quirky comedy Baskets, starring Zach Galifianakis, is one of the season's strangest new series—it's the kind of show you'll either love or never want to watch again. The comedy, about a Paris-trained clown (Galifianakis) who's stuck working at a rodeo in Bakersfield, Calif., also features two unusual brand spotlights for Costco and Arby's, both of which are interwoven into the fabric of the series. And even though Costco and Arby's are featured throughout the entire first season, neither is an actual integration. "Both are brands that we just wrote it into the script and then asked them if we could do it," said Jonathan Krisel, the show's co-creator and executive producer. "There's no money involved. We're not advertising for them, but it's more about the authenticity of having the real thing and not having it be a fake brand. And both of them were accommodating in that we're not celebrating them; we're not making fun." Krisel, who grew up going to Costco with his family, said the idea to include Costco and its Kirkland products came from Baskets' production designer as a way to feature real brands on the show without having to clear them individually with multiple companies. "The production designer said, 'What if we clear Kirkland, the brand?

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Patriots Fan Parody Blames Deflategate, Refs, Illuminati for Ending Super Bowl Run

January 27, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It's been a rough couple of days for fans of the New England Patriots. The defending Super Bowl champions were denied a return trip to the Big Game with a heart-breaking loss to their most hated rival, Peyton Manning . To make matters worse, the game likely came down to a first-quarter missed extra point attempt by usually reliable kicker Stephen Gostkowski (otherwise they wouldn't have had to go for two at the end to send the game into overtime). But in this tongue-in-cheek video released today by NBC Sports, two Patriots fans are finding others to blame, even indicting referee Ed Hochuli for moving the goal posts during Gostkowski's missed kick. Also, the Illuminti, because, why not? The video is the latest in a series between NBC Sports and Above Average's sports comedy vertical, The Kicker. The 5-episode series, dubbed "Sports... The Musical?", features Broadway actors and singers and is led by Brian Usifer, the music director of Kinky Boots.

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In a Good Sign for the Super Bowl, CBS Celebrates Highest-Rated AFC Championship in 29 Years

January 25, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Peyton Manning's nailbiter victory over Tom Brady helped drive Sunday's AFC Championship game to its highest ratings in 29 years, according to early estimates from Nielsen. In early numbers, which will be adjusted and updated later today, CBS said the AFC Championship—in which the Denver Broncos held off a last-second comeback attempt by the New England Patriots, to win 20-18—was the highest-rated telecast since last year's Super Bowl, which drew 111.4 million viewers and a 49.7 rating in adults 18-49 . While those numbers were likely boosted by East Coast residents snowed in for the weekend by Winter Storm Jonas, they are music to CBS' ears as the network gears up to air Super Bowl 50 on Feb. 7. With an average overnight household rating of 31.8, the game was the highest-rated AFC Championship in 29 years, since the Denver Broncos beat the Cleveland Browns in overtime in 1987. The household rating was 19 percent higher than the NFC Championship game which followed on Fox, and up 31 percent from last year's AFC Championship game, which aired in the later, prime time slot. That should translate to more than 50 million viewers when updated figures are available later today. 40.7 million (14.3 rating in 18-49) watched last night's NFC Championship on Fox, where the Carolina Panthers streamrolled the Arizona Cardinals, 49-15. A reported 20.6 million stuck around for the postgame, and 13.5 million (5.1 in 18-49) watched the 10:30-11 portion of The X-Files, which because of an usually long postgame, didn't start until around 10:24 p.m. ET. It's a solid start for The X-Files, which Fox is betting will reverse the recent spotty track record of revivals and reboots . The second episode airs tonight at 8 p.m. ET/PT, the show's regular time slot. As part of the show's elaborate marketing campaign , Fox ran spots during every NFL game this season, touting the show's post-NFC Championship premiere. Its series finale in 2002 drew 13.3 million. That is an improvement upon Fox's post-NFC Championship programming two years ago, the Season 2 premiere of its Kevin Bacon drama The Following, which drew 11.2 million total viewers and a 4.4 rating in 18-49

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Brands Can Now Find Out in Real Time How Many People Watch Their TV Ads. Here’s How

January 25, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Advertisers won't have to wait hours or days after this year's Super Bowl to find out how many people watched their spots during the Big Game. TV ad tracking company iSpot.tv has rolled out a new set of metrics that will offer brands real-time data on view rates, impressions and unduplicated reach for their ads. The service, which has tracked ad activity for three years, now provides this data for national and local ads watched on TV screens whether they're viewed live, time shifted, or via VOD or OTT. With all the changes in how audiences watch TV, "more and more ads are becoming decoupled from the programs themselves, and a lot of brands and networks are starting to move towards audience-based buying," said Sean Muller, iSpot.tv founder and CEO. "On top of that, digital has taught brands the power of being responsive with their media in general. So now, brands are really trying to become more responsive with television." The company is utilizing technology embedded into the firmware of 10 million TV sets in the U.S. that detects any kind of content, including ads, on the screens. iSpot.tv tags ads in its commercial catalog using fingerprint technology and tracks them on the screen with ACR, or automatic content recognition, no matter what kind of device is connected to the television

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