Posts Tagged ‘television’

FX Snatches Up the TV Rights to Air Straight Outta Compton

August 17, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Though it's not clear how much of the 147 minutes FX will be able to show on basic cable, the company said today it has acquired exclusive U.S. commercial television premiere rights to Straight Outta Compton. The biopic about late-1980s/early-1990s hip-hop group N.W.A—which launched the careers of Ice Cube and Dr. Dre—was the top-grossing movie this weekend with a $60.2 million opener. That's the fifth-highest August premiere ever. Airing the profanity-laden film will certainly be a challenge for the network's censors, though that hasn't stopped cable channels in the past from buying rights to hard R-rated films that aren't exactly family friendly. IFC is one of the few nonpremium cable networks that will air movies unedited, four-letter words and all. FX has been on a spending spree of late when it comes to blockbluster films. Straight Outta Compton joins a roster that includes commercial TV premiere rights for Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation, Minions, Jurassic World and Furious 7. FX has also licensed Trainwreck, Spy, Pixels, Terminator Genisys, Ted 2, Pitch Perfect 2, Taken 3, Kingsman: The Secret Service and Home.

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Which Networks’ Data Platforms Do Media Buyers Actually Like?

August 17, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Data dominated this year's upfront presentations, as each network claimed it had the best data platform to help advertisers and media buyers enhance TV buys. Now that upfront business has finally wrapped, we asked several buyers to anonymously review the networks' individual data offerings and separate the contenders from the pretenders. Their conclusions: It's a three-horse race. To buyers, three players stand out: NBCUniversal , Viacom and Turner . They gave low marks to ABC, CBS, Discovery and A&E for supplying little more than the data they and their clients already have access to. Said one buyer: "All ABC is doing is optimizing your prime-time inventory, which you could do on your own." Optimization less than optimal. One buyer praised Viacom's willingness to optimize its data every two weeks, though another said NBCU's quarterly optimization was just fine. "On our side, it requires man hours to be changing the schedules all the time as well. I doubt most clients would need to do it more frequently," the buyer said. Turner isn't allowing any optimization at all, "which obviously presents problems because if audiences are changing their viewership habits, you want to be able to follow them." They're down with ATP. Buyers gravitated toward NBCU's Audience Targeting Platform because of its ability to provide them with data from Comcast set-top boxes. "That's very appealing because that has not been offered in any platform to date," said a buyer. They're going with what they—or their clients—know. "I'm honestly leaning more toward NBCU because we do a lot of business with them," admitted one buyer. Another agreed that familiarity goes a long way, especially with platforms they've already beta-tested: "If I had to go to bat for one of them to a client, it would probably be Turner. Because I've already used it, and that holds a lot of water in terms of executing these kinds of things." Bigger is better. Buyers like that NBCU and Viacom products "span a large swath of different networks and different inventory. The bigger the available pull of inventory, the better targeted you can be," said one. That's where Turner has a tougher time measuring up. "If you're cutting the data a little thinner, then you start to run into sample-size issues and viability of buying against certain more granular targets," said another buyer

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Trump Will ‘Absolutely Not’ Be Back on Celebrity Apprentice

August 13, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On the 17th and final day of the Television Critics Association's summer press tour panels, NBC Entertainment chairman Robert Greenblatt summarized this tour's recurring themes. "Too many shows, not enough monetization, fractured audience, Netflix doesn't report ratings, what did Nielsen do this time?" he said. "And how do we find the next big comedy? In a nutshell, that's sort of what keeps me up at night." NBC, which publicly parted ways with Donald Trump in June, said it will not broadcast a new version of Celebrity Apprentice this season, but the show will return in 2016 "with a new host," Greenblatt said. Whoever that is will need to "make noise and be a big personality," he added. The network is "almost done" selling off its interest in the Miss USA Pageant, according to Greenblatt, who summarized the current relationship with Trump: "At the moment, we're sort of separated." However, he wouldn't say Trump is "banned" from the network, given that he "might be the leader of the free world." If Trump isn't elected president, could he return as Celebrity Apprentice host? "Absolutely not," said Greenblatt. Comedy Struggles and Thursday Night Of course, there's a little more than that weighing on the network boss as he looks ahead to fall. Even though NBC was the No. 1 network last season among adults ages 18 to 49 for the second year in a row, its trouble spots remain the same as when Greenblatt last met with reporters in January —comedies and its Thursday night lineup. "The fall is sort of a clean start for all of us, which I'm happy about," said Greenblatt. "We've been in a difficult transition in the last couple years," Greenblatt said, with the departure of 30 Rock, The Office and Parks and Recreation

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Stephen Colbert’s Late Show Wish? That Donald Trump Stays in the Presidential Race

August 11, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As the debut of The Late Show with Stephen Colbert approaches, only one thing is keeping Colbert up at night. It's not the pressure of replacing an icon like David Letterman, nor is it doing a show without his "Stephen Colbert" persona, which he retired after winding down The Colbert Report last year on Comedy Central. Instead, he's is most worried Donald Trump will drop out of the presidential race by Sept. 8, Colbert's launch day. "I want to do jokes on Donald Trump so badly, and I have no venue.

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Don’t Panic, Says CBS: More People Are Watching TV Now Than a Decade Ago

August 10, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On Friday, FX sounded the alarm about the state, and future, of television. But today CBS offered a counterpoint to FX chief John Landgraf's argument, as network execs made their case that TV's future is much healthier than many would believe. That was the message that David Poltrack, chief research officer of CBS Corp. and president of CBS Vision, and Marc DeBevoise, evp and gm at CBS Interactive, kept hammering home as they met with reporters at the Television Critics Association's summer press tour. Poltrack set out to puncture what he called three major "myths" about the industry and its future: that TV viewership is in decline (not true, he said), that millennials are moving away from TV content (only partly true) and that advertising in TV programs has lost value (also untrue, per Poltrack: "If executed effectively, advertising in TV programs has actually gained value"). When it comes to watching TV shows, Poltrack said, the audience for CBS programming has actually grown in the last decade. It's up to 12.3 million viewers in 2014-2015 from 12.1 million viewers in 2003-2004.

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Vice Uses YouTube’s 360 Degree VR for New Sports Series

August 10, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Ever wonder what it's like to jump and flip around the desert of Utah's Goblin Valley Skate Park? A new series from Vice Sports will let you experience that, without the threat of injury. Vice Sports has teamed up with lead sponsor Reebok for The Moment, which will spotlight athletes and give viewers a first-hand experience of extreme sports. The Moment utilizes YouTube's 360-degree virtual reality functionality, a technology that has also been used by Lincoln Motor Company, Syfy, MTV and GoPro. The series launched today with Parkour athlete and stuntman Ronnie Shalvis as he performs, jumps and flips throughout the desert of Utah's Goblin Valley State Park. The 360-degree VR kicks in around the four-minute mark of the six-minute video. Each episode can be watched either in standard definition or using a 360-degree view on the YouTube player.

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Vice Launches Its First Female-Focused Channel

August 3, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Vice is still not ready to announce its much-rumored linear channel , but the media company unveiled its 11th digital channel today. Broadly is the first Vice channel designed for women. With Broadly, the company that's mostly been seen as a place for edgy, male-driven content will now battle with the likes Jezebel, Hairpin, and Bustle. Jezebel alum Tracie Egan Morrissey will lead the site as editor in chief and director of content. "New media has been a game-changer for feminism—its appeal is palpable," said Morrissey in a statement. "We can no longer be told that it's not relevant or that we're just imagining things. And so now is the time to elevate the coverage of women's interests by telling the stories that matter to us through in-depth, original reporting and documentary video." Launching in the U.S., U.K. and Canada, Broadly will touch on topics from a female perspective including politics, culture, sex, and fashion

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Destination America Tries to Scare Up Viewers With a Live Exorcism

July 30, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Discovery may have gotten out of the outlandish-TV-stunts business, but its sister networks didn't get that memo. Destination America will televise what it's calling the first live exorcism in U.S. history, airing Exorcism: Live! on Oct. 30. A house, not a person, will be the subject of the exorcism, which will take place at the same suburban St. Louis home where an exorcism was performed on Roland Doe in 1949. That event inspired William Peter Blatty's 1971 novel The Exorcist and its iconic 1973 film adaptation, which starred Linda Blair. During the telecast, paranormal investigators the Tennessee Wraith Chasers from the network's Ghost Asylum, along with psychic medium Chip Coffey, "will explore each crevice of this terrifying home, from the attic to the basement, to find whatever or whomever has scared Americans to death for decades," said Destination America in a release.

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No Surprises, No Compromises: Freddy Wong’s Tips for Great Brand-YouTuber Partnerships

July 30, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

RocketJump is one of the most successful entertainment channels on YouTube. With more than 7.6 million subscribers the channel has grown into a powerhouse in the action/comedy genre. And while that reach can be alluring to advertisers, RocketJump CEO Freddie Wong says there are a few things you need to know before brands get into bed with creators. We caught up with Wong at Vidcon where, in the video above, he gave practical advice to brands and YouTubers: "If it doesn't feel organic to the audience, you gotta trust your gut." We also challenged RocketJump's CFO Jamie Lukaszewski to interview his boss about how the company works with brands, and how DIY digital video is changing how media is produced, consumed and sold. "It's going to look, in some ways, like traditional movies and traditional television, and in some ways it's going to look like nothing you've ever seen befofre," says Wong. Adweek responsive video player used on /video.

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Tips for Great Brand-Creator Partnerships From One of YouTube’s Biggest Stars

July 30, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

RocketJump is one of the most successful entertainment channels on YouTube. With more than 7.6 million subscribers, it has grown into a powerhouse in the action/comedy genre. And while that reach can be alluring to advertisers, RocketJump CEO Freddie Wong says there are a few things brands and creators need to know before getting into bed together. We caught up with Wong at VidCon in Anaheim, Calif., last week. He shares practical advice for brands and YouTubers in the video above: "If it doesn't feel organic to the audience, you gotta trust your gut." We also challenged RocketJump's CFO Jamie Lukaszewski to interview his boss about how the company works with brands, and how DIY digital video is changing how media is produced, consumed and sold. "It's going to look, in some ways, like traditional movies and traditional television, and in some ways it's going to look like nothing you've ever seen before," says Wong in the video below. Adweek responsive video player used on /video.

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