Posts Tagged ‘television’

This Mika Brzezinski and NBCU Tour Is All About Empowering Women Leaders

March 2, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In 2011 Mika Brzezinski released her powerful New York Times bestselling manifesto, Knowing Your Value: Women, Money and Getting What You're Worth —a must read for women everywhere. And now, Brzezinski, co-host of MSNBC's Morning Joe, will bring

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Nickelodeon Unveils Subscription Service for Preschoolers at Upfront

February 25, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Starting March 5, Nickelodeon will debut a streaming service for TV's smallest viewers: Noggin, a preschool-targeted, ad-free app that will stream reruns of Blue's Clues; Little Bear; Ni hao, Kai-Lan; and music videos featuring Nick's kids characters. The $5.99 monthly service will be "library-based, separate and distinct from Nickelodeon's preschool content available on its existing distribution platforms," the company assures. But it's a good indicator of which way the wind is blowing—we've been saying for years that kids prefer the iPad to TV. The announcement came out of Nick's Wednesday afternoon presentation, in which the company also announced a number of new series and took a victory lap for its recent movie successes, including The SpongeBob SquarePants Movie and Michael Bay's recent Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles flick, represented at the event by star Will Arnett. Nick is doubling down on star Nick Cannon, who co-creates and produces the new musical series Make It Pop. The network is also going really old school: H.R. Pufnstuf masterminds Sid and Marty Krofft will have an upcoming show on the network—yes, really—called Mutt & Stuff starring actual dogs and, obviously, dog puppets. Should be trippy.

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Why Keith Olbermann Picked Such a Dumb Fight on Twitter and Ended Up Suspended

February 25, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

ESPN commentator and world-champion friendmaker Keith Olbermann today launched a twitter war with college students who'd raised $13 million to fight pediatric cancer. The incident left Olbermann with a (paid) suspension through the end of the week, and it left many of us with one simple question: What the hell, man? Olbermann's more vocal critics are just chalking it up to him being a jerk. But more specifically and perhaps generously, there are three intersecting issues that likely led to his poor decision to lash out at Penn State's entire student body as they celebrated saving children's lives: 1. His seething anger at how the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse case was handled by Penn State and coach Joe Paterno was inflamed again recently by the NCAA's decision to reinstate 112 wins that had been stripped from the school's record during the time Sandusky, an assistant coach, had been molesting children. 2. Olbermann loves sparring on Twitter, and Penn State is an easy topic to rile him up with. Once he was in fight mode, he seemed unwilling or unable to pause for a breather. 3. As with many misunderstandings on the Internet, he probably just didn't click the link to see what the original tweet was about, or else even Olbermann might have decided to pick his battles a bit more carefully. Speaking of the original tweet, here's how it all began, when a Penn State alumna (who had sparred with Olbermann on Twitter in the past ) tweeted at him about the school's success in raising $13 million for children being treated for cancer at the university's Milton S. Hershey Medical Center: @lisaadeleon ...Pitiful — Keith Olbermann (@KeithOlbermann) February 23, 2015 So @KeithOlbermann says PSU students raising over $13m for pediatric cancer research is "pitiful." No sir, u r the definition of the word. — Dave Seidel (@dave_seidel) February 23, 2015 As you can see from Olbermann's next reply, he didn't seem to have noticed the fact he had responded to a tweet about students raising money to fight child cancer: . @dave_seidel No, Son. I said PSU students were pitiful. Had nothing to do with fundraising #AlsoPSUReadingComprehensionAppearsToBeWeak — Keith Olbermann (@KeithOlbermann) February 23, 2015 . @dave_seidel her tweet reads "we are..." I finished her sentence "...pitiful." At this rate your diploma won't be recognized, Moron — Keith Olbermann (@KeithOlbermann) February 23, 2015 . @dave_seidel Again - get your $ back - you didn't learn how to read. PSU students are pitiful because they're PSU students - period.

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Pee-wee Herman’s 30-Year Journey From Obscurity, Through Infamy and Onto Netflix

February 24, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Netflix let it be known today that the long-awaited third Pee-wee Herman film, Pee-wee's Big Holiday, would finally make it to the ... well, not the big screen, but a screen. Specifically any screen hooked up to a Netflix subscription. The project has been in the works with producer Judd Apatow for nearly five years, but the original team —Pee-wee portrayer Paul Reubens and Arrested Development writer Paul Rust on script duties, Apatow producing—is now in place at Netflix. It's a show with a rich history, some of it very strange. The movie goes into production next month and, given Netflix's track record, will probably get made at an impresisve level of investment (the first two seasons of House of Cards cost a reported $100 million ) for television and a totally reasonable level for an indie comedy. With Pee-wee on his way back into the national limelight, we thought we'd take a look back at the long, strange trip that brought him to Netflix:

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Emerging Cable Network WGN America Looks to Cast Its Spell Over SXSW Film

February 24, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On March 13, WGN America and its original series Salem will turn the official SXSW Film opening party into a "witches' playground," complete with fortune tellers, aerial dancers and other elements of the supernatural.

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Infographic: a Look at Kids’ Media Consumption

February 23, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It may not be surprising that kids in every age group are watching TV regularly, but that's far from the only way the lunchbox set are consuming media. With digital devices now a facet of everyday life, even the youngest among us are tuning in via tech. "When Nielsen looked at the cross-platform consumption of children, from toddlers to teens, there were a few things that became abundantly clear," said Kelly Abcarian, svp, Nielsen Kids Center of Excellence. "Traditional TV remains the favored choice for kids of all ages to connect with content, but as they cognitively and developmentally grow, so do their media preferences." Exclusive data from Nielsen shows how kids' viewership habits develop and shift from age 2 through high school years.

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CSI and Elementary Are Coming to Hulu

February 19, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Two of CBS' biggest crime dramas are heading to Hulu. The video platform scored the exclusive rights to CSI: Crime Scene Investigation and Elementary. As more people view shows on digital screens, top players like Hulu, Netflix and Amazon end up battling for premium linear content. Scoring CSI, which was TV's top drama for seven seasons, expands Hulu's offerings to more than 5,300 episodes. While the procedural isn't the powerhouse it used to be—only drawing 7.1 million viewers during its two-hour series finale on Sunday—it did spawn three spin-offs, multiple books and video games, and a forensic science exhibit. "CSI is one of the biggest brands in the world and is exactly the kind of premium content that marketers love buying from us," Hulu svp of sales Peter Naylor wrote in an email.

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5 Delicious Questions for Tom Colicchio About His New Gig at MSNBC

February 18, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Big news from MSNBC this morning: Celebrity chef Tom Colicchio will become the network's first food correspondent and debut two new shows. Stirring the Pot will air on the network's new digital channel, Shift, and Everybody Eats will air on MSNBC and feature Colicchio taking influential folks to lunch. He'll also contribute reports to other shows on the network. We asked him five questions about the new gig (not counting "why does my 'Wichcraft sandwich disappear so quickly?"). Adweek: What are you looking forward to talking about in this new role? Colicchio: Just starting a conversation around food. I think, in more ways than people are aware of, there are issues around food safety, around transparency in the food system, obviously hunger—there are so many things to bump up against. There's a lot of television celebrating food, but I think people are ready for a different kind of conversation. How important is the affordability of good food? More and more so, I think. This isn't about the elite being able to eat organic food. That's fine, but we need to start talking about health and health in eating. We should start with a different baseline and look at the affordability of healthier foods, and that brings you right to policy, because then you look at what we're supporting with subsidies. If a head of broccoli or a peach is more expensive than a fast-food burger, I don't know if we're supporting the right things. How would changing subsidies to encourage healthy eating work? There's plenty of noise out there about limiting the soft drinks you can purchase—but let's actually incentivize people to do the right thing, which you typically do with price. It's very easy to demonize somebody for making that decision, but you need to look at it from a different angle

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Parks and Rec Made a Bunch of Fake Ads for Last Night’s Show, and They Were Great

February 18, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

NBC's Parks and Recreation will soon come to an end, and the writers of the heartwarming, droll comedy have been knocking it out of the ... well, park. The first of last night's two episodes featured Chris Pratt's character Andy Dwyer saying goodbye to his kids' program, Johnny Karate's

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Why Leave It to Beaver Has Stations Seeing Green

February 17, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In recent years, at the far end of the channel lineup, a slew of upstart broadcast diginets, or subchannels, quietly started popping up thanks to changes in FCC regulations that let TV stations broadcast multiple channels. And while much of their programming—news, weather and lifestyle content characterized by low production values—would hardly be considered Emmy-worthy, some are stealing a page from cable networks like USA and TBS in their early days by leaning on reruns of classic TV shows. MeTV , a channel that airs The Honeymooners, has been cleared in 94 percent of the U.S., according to Neal Sabin, vice chairman of parent Weigel Broadcasting Co. Tribune Media's Antenna TV. This diginet's schedule is filled with episodes of series like Leave It to Beaver and has cleared the top 20 markets and 75 percent of the country.

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