Posts Tagged ‘television’

Businessweek Art Director Richard Turley Leaves for MTV

April 22, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Richard Turley is set to make waves in the design world at a completely new port of call: MTV. The always-interesting , sometimes-controversial

Read More

Upfronts TV Preview: Sci-fi and Fantasy [Video]

April 22, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Is there a new Walking Dead on the way, a new American Horror Story, maybe? Our cable guy has been screening the trailers in time for this week's upfront presentations.

Read More

The 2014 Upfront Preview

April 22, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Analogies are often facile things, contrivances designed to hammer home a theme when a light tap of the mallet would suffice. But in light of the fact that it’s a) set in the advertising world and b) is the most self-reflexive show on television, the prospect of using Mad Men as a lens through which to observe the broadcast TV marketplace is too alluring to pass up. In a sense, each of the Big Four networks has a near-perfect analogue in one of the beautiful losers at Cooper Sterling Draper Dead Guy Harry Hamlin Whatever. CBS is clearly Roger Sterling. Les Moonves ’ silver fox flagship is bold, cocksure and is so damned good at doing its job that it almost makes the business of broadcast look easy. A fine-tuned revenue machine—its unparalleled retransmission consent numbers and homegrown output leaves it less exposed to the vicissitudes of the ad market than its rivals—CBS is something of an impenetrable fortress. But a chest X-ray and a full cardio workup might suggest that the aging network is one highball-and-tobacco binge away from catastrophic collapse. Although it probably would rather be Peggy Olson, ABC is Joan Harris. Unapologetically feminine, assertive and absolutely devastating when in its comfort zone, the network boasts some of the very few must-watch series on the broadcast dial. Unfortunately, when men aren’t leering at Joan like a horny wolf in a Tex Avery cartoon, they dismiss her altogether. (Perhaps if she wore a football helmet around the home office the boys would take her more seriously.) And while she always appears composed and unruffled—the picture of self-possession—under the surface she’s paddling furiously like a swan on Dexedrine. (It’s a hard-knock life when you’re on track to finish last in the ratings race for the third year running.) Fox is Pete Campbell. Youngish but starting to age faster than he really should be, the glib smarmball has embraced the ephemera of Southern California after making a hash of things back East. But while many of the attributes he once relied on have all but disintegrated (looking at you, American Idol and New Girl), Pete wavers between archly gaming the system and total system collapse. Like his implacably receding hairline, his mojo is really starting to wear thin. Although he’s got a string of successes under his needlepoint belt, the account exec is going to have to make some big moves in L.A. if he’s going to get back to his A game. Which leaves NBC. No. 1 with a bullet, the Peacock’s spirit animal is none other than Don Draper

Read More

Ad of the Day: Watching Sex Scenes With Your Parents Is Weird, Says HBO

April 21, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As someone who once, as a teenager, was watching this George Carlin bit when his parents walked into the room, I can appreciate SS+K's new HBO campaign, aimed at millennials, which rightly attests that some programming is just better consumed without your mom and dad around. Seven new online spots feature awkward family scenes where a pair of hyper-oblivious parents sit down with their young-adult son and daughter to watch some of HBO's notoriously racy shows—among them, Girls and Game of Thrones. It doesn't go that well. Most of the spots involve the family silently watching sex scenes—always a good time, especially when the old folks pipe up with cringe-worthy banter. (Part of the humor here derives from Mom and Dad not actually seeming uncomfortable enough .) All of the ads end with the on-screen line, "Might be a good time for HBO Go," followed by a voiceover: "HBO Go. The best of HBO on all your favorite devices

Read More

TiVo: Adherence to C3 Is Sucking Millions Out of TV Ad Market

April 21, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In what may be the most cogent argument for the adoption of the C7 ratings currency, TiVo Research on Monday revealed that broadcasters beholden to the dated C3 metric are leaving hundreds of millions of dollars in ad sales revenue on the table. According to TiVo’s analysis of its top 10 “Season Pass” broadcast series (a designation reserved for the shows that subscribers most commonly flag for automatic, full-season recording), there is an average lift of 8.2 percent in overall deliveries when four days of playback are added to the C3 data . As that increase is not compensated under the current metric, this translates to an overall loss of $87.8 million in ad sales for those 10 programs. (As the data was generated in a second-by-second analysis of TiVo subscriber behaviors, the numbers were not broken down by the relevant demographics.) Of the 10 series under the microscope, ABC’s Modern Family sees the greatest increase upon application of four to seven additional days of playback (10.9 percent). Based on the average unit cost per 30-second spot of $244,630, as furnished by SQAD NetCost, Modern Family season to date is missing out on an estimated $10.9 million in actionable revenue. The SQAD data is in line with the average unit costs furnished by media buyers. In a survey of top agencies , Adweek last fall concluded that a 30-second spot in Modern Family sold for $257,435 during the 2013-14 upfront. While a shift from C3 to C7 doesn’t proportionately move the ratings needle for Fox’s American Idol, which is largely watched in real time, the elevated cost of buying time in the show translates into the most amount of viewing that remains uncompensated. Per TiVo, when the 4.1 percent boost in deliveries is brought to bear on the average unit cost for the Wednesday and Thursday night Idol ($319,565 a pop), it all adds up to $14.4 million in wasted opportunities. CBS has been the loudest , and most strident , voice calling for the implementation of the more inclusive metric, but it is unlikely that a sea change will be implemented in time to have a significant impact on this year’s upfront. That said, CBS (and to some extent, ABC) has done some early C7 deals with automakers. Things should pick up on the cable side as well. “Don’t be shocked if you see cable playing a little bit more of a role in [the C7 sandbox] this year,” said Fox Cable Networks ad sales president Lou LaTorre, who added that the incremental addition of time-shifted deliveries led to a 6 percent to 8 percent increase in viewership of original cable series. “There’s a notion among some in the industry that by simply gaming the blunt instrument of average commercial minute measurement the ratings currency provides, networks can gain back some of the advantage advertisers get from unmeasured viewership beyond the three-day window,” said TiVo chief research officer Jonathan Steuer. “The reality is that only an extended measurement approach that combines both precise measurement of media viewership and a comprehensive understanding of audience composition can enable networks and advertisers to evaluate what commercial ratings truly are over the course of a seven-day viewing period.” Largely seen as a compromise from the moment it was adopted in 2007, C3 is a blend of the average rating of all commercial minutes in a program in live viewing plus three days of playback. Six of TiVo’s top 10 Season Pass series air on CBS, while three are ABC properties. Fox elbowed its way onto the big board with Idol, but NBC was shut out.

Read More

Don Draper Gets Honest With Sally in Your Mad Men Minute [Video]

April 21, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Familiar names and faces reappear in the mix this week, from Bob in Detroit to Sally Draper in yet another showdown with her lying dad.

Read More

Inside Bonnie Hammer’s World

April 21, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

NBC Cable Entertainment chairman Bonnie Hammer's portfolio spans 15 networks of varying sizes and descriptions, all serving (hopefully) a different viewership. Hammer's famous for crafting programming slates with strong brand identities associated with them, so she's had her work cut out for her given the size of that portfolio. Here are her biggest responsibilities…and what she's doing with them.

Read More

Aereo vs. Broadcast TV: The Case That Could Change Everything

April 21, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On April 22, attorneys for Aereo and the broadcast TV networks will face off before the Supreme Court in American Broadcasting Companies Inc. v. Aereo . The closely watched case could change the course of broadcast television and determine the future of the emerging over-the-top video marketplace. With so much on the line, Aereo—fighting to stay in business—and the broadcasters that want to shut it down have enlisted the services of a couple of big-name Washington attorneys with deep ties to the high court. The Supreme Court decision , which could come in late summer, will end two years of legal battles that began just prior to Aereo’s launch in New York. What Aereo calls a technology that gets it around the copyright law to deliver over-the-air TV stations on the Internet broadcasters call a legal gimmick and a clear violation of copyright. As Aereo rolled out in other cities, broadcasters sued. Aereo won in New York and Boston but lost in Utah. When broadcasters petioned the Supreme Court last October to hear the case, the response of Aereo, knowing it faced an endless series of expensive lawsuits, was: Bring it on. The question before the court Whether a company “publicly performs a copyrighted television program when it retransmits a broadcast of that program to thousands of paid subscribers over the Internet.” What’s at stake for Aereo? If it loses, Barry Diller, Aereo’s financial backer, has said the startup is toast .

Read More

Marjorie Kaplan Is Juggling 2 Discovery Networks Through the Upfront and Beyond

April 21, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who Marjorie Kaplan New gig Group president, TLC and Animal Planet Old gig Group president, Animal Planet, Science Channel and Velocity Age 52 So TLC is a huge business. What’s it like handling that network and Animal Planet? I’m like a crazy person now. We’re heading into the upfront, so I’m doing two upfronts, and I’m really trying to put a stamp on what we’re doing on TLC with no time to spare. One of the things that recharges your creative cells is exposure to new things and new people. I was describing it to somebody as like being in love: You have that unbelievable amount of energy, and you suddenly don’t need any sleep. Is it possible to sustain that for long? Well, I’ve got to make sure my husband still knows he’s married to me. I don’t think it’s appropriate to expect to maintain this level of engagement on both businesses, but you do have to dive into the deep end at first. I’ve been on Animal Planet a long time, and I can trust that team to move the ball forward. What do you want to accomplish at TLC? We need to remind the TLC audience of who we are. What we see happening right now with The Little Couple is a great moment for TLC. It gives us everything everyone loves about the brand. [Jen Arnold’s battle with cancer] has a happy ending—we’re not raking the audience over the coals with the experience. It’s about seeing the love and the humor. These are not painful emotional experiences, they’re life-affirming, playful shows. How is that different from the rest of the cable landscape?

Read More

Marjorie Kaplan Is Juggling 2 Discovery Networks Through the Upfront and Beyond

April 21, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who Marjorie Kaplan New gig Group president, TLC and Animal Planet Old gig Group president, Animal Planet, Science Channel and Velocity Age 52 So TLC is a huge business. What’s it like handling that network and Animal Planet? I’m like a crazy person now. We’re heading into the upfront, so I’m doing two upfronts, and I’m really trying to put a stamp on what we’re doing on TLC with no time to spare. One of the things that recharges your creative cells is exposure to new things and new people. I was describing it to somebody as like being in love: You have that unbelievable amount of energy, and you suddenly don’t need any sleep. Is it possible to sustain that for long? Well, I’ve got to make sure my husband still knows he’s married to me. I don’t think it’s appropriate to expect to maintain this level of engagement on both businesses, but you do have to dive into the deep end at first. I’ve been on Animal Planet a long time, and I can trust that team to move the ball forward. What do you want to accomplish at TLC? We need to remind the TLC audience of who we are. What we see happening right now with The Little Couple is a great moment for TLC. It gives us everything everyone loves about the brand. [Jen Arnold’s battle with cancer] has a happy ending—we’re not raking the audience over the coals with the experience. It’s about seeing the love and the humor. These are not painful emotional experiences, they’re life-affirming, playful shows

Read More