Posts Tagged ‘technology’

Rivals Throw Water on Publicis Omnicom Merger

September 25, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The Publicis-Omnicom merger will create the biggest ad holding company in history, but is that a good thing? David Jones, global CEO of rival Havas, thinks not. “The complexity is enormous,”

Read More

Drawing the Line

September 17, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

… I fully appreciate that there is a systemic sexism problem in the technology industry, and that allowing such behavior to go without being criticized encourages that to continue. But at the same time, this case produced what seemed like an orgy of outrage that at times felt like the beginnings of an angry mob — if only because of the speed and aggressiveness of the response. – Mathew Ingram , from a post entitled “Public shaming and free speech: Why the rush to attack Pax Dickinson makes me nervous”

Read More

New AOL Networks CEO Bob Lord Talks About Where the Online Ad Market Is Headed (Video)

September 13, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Lauren Goode/ATD AOL Networks CEO Bob Lord Earlier this week, Bob Lord, the new CEO of its AOL Networks, sat down at AllThingsD global HQ for a chat with me about his new job. A well-regarded industry veteran who was most recently global CEO of Razorfish and CEO of Publicis Groupe’s digital technologies division, he is now in charge of the suite of marketing and advertising services and technologies at the New York company. The job is largely centered on selling premium display, video and mobile network ads for the Web portal via its automated technology systems. As I noted when Lord was hired at the end of August , “AOL is hoping to use tech means to boost its business, but results have been harder to realize. While revenue rose in the recent quarter, profits declined. Lord is a good choice to help push AOL forward, with much ad tech experience over the years, especially at Razorfish.” Here he is talking about all that and more, including a book he recently co-authored, titled “Converge: Transforming Business at the Intersection of Marketing and Technology,” in a video interview: [ See post to watch video ]

Read More

New AOL Networks CEO Bob Lord Talks About Where the Online Ad Market Is Headed (Video)

September 13, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Lauren Goode/ATD AOL Networks CEO Bob Lord Earlier this week, Bob Lord, the new CEO of its AOL Networks, sat down at AllThingsD global HQ for a chat with me about his new job. A well-regarded industry veteran who was most recently global CEO of Razorfish and CEO of Publicis Groupe’s digital technologies division, he is now in charge of the suite of marketing and advertising services and technologies at the New York company. The job is largely centered on selling premium display, video and mobile network ads for the Web portal via its automated technology systems. As I noted when Lord was hired at the end of August , “AOL is hoping to use tech means to boost its business, but results have been harder to realize. While revenue rose in the recent quarter, profits declined.

Read More

New Media

September 10, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

I think there is always a space for both. Whenever there’s a new form of media we always think it’s going to replace the old thing and it never does. We still have radio, however long after TV was introduced. – Matt Mullenweg , on old media being displaced by new media, from an interview with Martin Nisenholtz.

Read More

The NFL Continues to Go Solo in Digital

August 22, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When it comes to digital partnerships, the NFL likes to say no. During a press event in New York on Wednesday (highlighted by Marshall Faulk’s bow tie, among other things), reps from the NFL Network talked about a slew of new second-screen apps, including a single mobile app that works across carriers, as well as two apps tied to specific NFL Network shows. The league knows that huge numbers of its fans play fantasy football , and/or are inclined to watch games with mobile devices in hand. And while plenty of NFL fans congregate in social media, the league feels its second screen apps have an advantage, given the amount of stats and exclusive video and interviews it can provide (though that's also true of ESPN, Yahoo, and any of the networks that broadcast its games). “It starts with a passionate fan base,” said Greg Isaacs, the league’s vp of digital media. ”And the trends we’ve seen are that 50 to 80 percent of fans watch our games with a second screen.” But what was perhaps most noteworthy—telling even—about Wednesday's event was the absence of digital partnerships announced by the NFL

Read More

Why Web TV Skeptic Mark Cuban Thinks Google Can Make the NFL Work on the Web

August 22, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Ezra Shaw/Getty Images Sport If Google ends up getting the rights to stream NFL games over the Web , could the Web handle it? That is: Is America’s Internet infrastructure capable of letting millions of people watch the same football games, at the same time, while delivering a TV-quality picture? We’ve seen hints that the Web is now up to the challenge , but for now we don’t really have an answer. We won’t know until someone tries. Still, I figured it would be worth asking some folks who know a bit about Web video and TV. So I started with Mark Cuban. Cuban, as you may recall, got into Web streaming way back in Web 1.0, and became a billionaire after he sold his Broadcast.com to Yahoo. Fast-forward to today, and Cuban is pouring a lot of resources into conventional TV, via his HDNet/AXS TV venture. He has also been a frequent skeptic about the limits of YouTube specifically and Internet video in general . Surprise! Cuban thinks the Web, and Google, are capable of delivering NFL games to your TV. Less surprising is that Cuban has lots of other things to say. Short version: Cuban says Google would be smart to grab the NFL’s “Sunday Ticket” rights from DirecTV. Here’s the long version, compiled via an email exchange today: I think Google could do 20 million simultaneous users now at a highly compressed HD. In the next 18 months, 30 million. But that is going to eat up a lot of resources, and it’s going to be difficult to do much quality of service. It’s one thing to originate it and distribute it. It’s another to make sure that every peered Internet provider will get it to the home at a quality Google wants it delivered

Read More

MIT Releases Report on Deceased Activist Aaron Swartz

July 30, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology has released a review of its actions in a case involving Aaron Swartz, the Internet activist who committed suicide last year. The report concluded that MIT’s actions were “reasonable, appropriate and made in good faith,” but that the university “missed an opportunity to demonstrate the leadership that we pride ourselves on.” A number of activist groups immediately condemned the report, including Swartz’s partner Taren Stinebrickner-Kauffman, who called MIT’s findings “a whitewash” of the facts.

Read More

Why Wall Street Should Care About Marketing Data

July 26, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Image copyright leungchopan Today’s CMOs are making major investments to reach their target audiences across dozens of touchpoints — on their own websites, through search, display advertising and email, and increasingly on social channels and mobile devices. The problem is, most of the technology platforms marketers are using to accomplish this don’t talk to each other. What’s more, many of the groups within the organization running these programs are just as siloed. This means that the things marketers learn about customers in one channel often don’t translate into sound strategy decisions for other channels. I’ll give you an example. Today, if someone clicks on a display ad, reaches a landing page and fills out a form, the CRM or marketing automation system can capture that lead and track that it came from display advertising. What marketers can’t yet do is take advantage of the information exchange in the opposite direction. What if they could use the rich information stored in the CRM system — such as how far along a prospect is in the sales pipeline — to make the display ad creative and messaging more relevant? Marketing executives know they need to get their systems and people to talk to each other. In fact, a new study by Accenture Interactive, “ Turbulence for the CMO ,” reveals that 70 percent of top CMOs think they have five years to fundamentally overhaul their companies’ corporate marketing operating model to achieve competitive success. Big marketing technology companies know this too, and it is why companies like Salesforce, Oracle and Google are duking it out to own the customer data and CRM system. They want to be at the center of the value created by unlocking this marketing data and getting at an integrated view of a prospect or customer. Think about how powerful it would be to serve up personalized Web content based on the ads someone has previously been exposed to, events they’ve attended, or when they’ve most recently engaged with a sales rep, or, to easily target email or display ads to just those people who engaged with a social campaign.

Read More

Judge Rules in Favor of Dish in DVR Ad-Skipping Dispute With Fox

July 24, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Dish has won another battle in its ongoing war with Fox over whether or not its ad-skipping software is legal: A panel of judges upheld Los Angeles district court Judge Dolly Gee's ruling from last fall, when she threw out Fox's injunction request. Specifically, Gee ruled that Fox hadn't proven that Dish was making copies of Fox's shows, though she allowed that the company had progressed beyond another recently litigated technology—Cablevision's remote storage DVRs. The case will be allowed to continue without any preliminary action from the law, though Fox will doubtless keep up the pressure on the MSO. Fox endeavored to tell the public that the ruling was neither just nor a setback. "We are disappointed in the court’s ruling, even though the bar to secure a preliminary injunction is very high," said the network in a statement. "This is not about consumer choice or advances in technology.

Read More