Posts Tagged ‘technology’

With 3 New Podcasts, Sports Illustrated Is Doubling Down on Audio

September 7, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The NFL regular season starts this week, and Sports Illustrated wants to load up your podcast apps with football commentary all fall. SI is launching three new weekly podcasts with DGital Media today, audio extensions of its Monday Morning Quarterback (MMQB) website that covers football. MMQB editor Peter King will host one of the shows— The MMQB Podcast with Peter King —featuring interviews with the likes of John Elway, Seattle Seahawks defensive end Michael Bennett and Arizona Cardinals coach Bruce Arians. In addition to King's show, there are two other football-themed podcasts: one with reporter Albert Breer and another one called The Ten Things MMQB Podcast. Sports Illustrated is backing up its investment in audio with stats. Streams for its existing shows, including the SI Media podcast hosted by Richard Deitsch and the basketball-themed SI's Open Floor, have increased 200 percent in the past year with downloads up 150 percent. "As time goes along, we'll introduce some non-MMQB podcasts, but with football starting this week, this represents the best opportunity to fill the richest conversation from the start," said Chris Stone, group editorial director at Sports Illustrated. "Even anecdotally, we sense that [this] is beyond the football space." He added, "We saw this summer in particular basketball around the NBA finals—we saw massive spikes in people who were engaging and downloading our podcast." At launch, King's show will be sponsored by Blue Apron, FanDuel, SeatGeek and Harry's with preroll and midroll ads. Unlike other podcasts that prerecord ads with a separate voice, all of Sports Illustrated's ads will be read by the hosts. "It allows a premium influencer like a Peter King to talk through what that sponsorship is, whether it's a 60-second or 30-second midroll or preroll spot," said Chris Corcoran, chief content officer at DGital Media.

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Why Is It Still So Hard to Share Audio Files in Social Media?

September 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

While continuous advances in social media and mobile technology have warmly embraced the sharing of photos, articles and videos, audio has been left in the cold—despite the recent resurgence of podcasts. The absence of truly direct ways to share audio files, whether they be songs or podcasts, via Facebook and Twitter has left musicians and podcasters scrambling for workarounds in order to avoid the dilemma faced by application developers—fighting for attention in increasingly crowded app stores (mainly iTunes) and hoping for discoverability via search engines. For the most part, podcasters must resort to sharing links to their content, which does not endear them to social network users, who are often reluctant to click through and leave their networks for other environments, nor to the social networks themselves, as they tend to prioritize "native" content, or content uploaded directly to their networks. Workarounds do exist. Twitter's integration of audio cards from SoundCloud presented podcasters with the opportunity to post their content directly to that social network, but there are pitfalls there, too.

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Flipboard Will Soon Begin Selling Programmatic Mobile Ads

August 30, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Flipboard is turning a new page and will begin selling programmatic display and native ads. The mobile app known for offering users a sampling of stories from around the web will offer ads through a private marketplace enabled by Rubicon Project beginning next month. Brands will also be able to utilize Flipboard's targeting capabilities that allows it to reach users based on their reading interests and demographics. According to Nicole McCormack, Flipboard's head of sales strategy, the move will expand capabilities beyond direct sales to allow the more than 10,000 advertisers who have access to the marketplace to reach the app's 90 million monthly users. Top advertisers already on Flipboard include Intel, Toyota, Lexus and Bank of America. "One of the things we bring to the programmatic space in a mobile environment is a really high quality audience and a premium one," McCormack said. Through Rubicon Project's exchange API, advertisers will be able to utilize the exchange that was built specifically for mobile.

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This Study From Nielsen and Google Says YouTube and Linear TV Help Each Other

August 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

YouTube and TV—two competing mediums fighting for the same eyeballs and advertising dollars—might actually be able to find common ground. A Nielsen case study commissioned by Google found that TV reach seems to drive YouTube engagement, and in turn, YouTube engagement drives TV reach. In other words, according to the report, people who view a TV program's content on YouTube are more likely to tune in to the actual show. Because of that, as TV audience increases, so does YouTube viewership. According to Nielsen, digital advertising in the U.S. has been rising 15 percent every year since 2012 with no signs of slowing down. (In fact, according to eMarketer , digital ad spending will surpass TV as soon as next year.) But the seemingly symbiotic relationship could be a sign for advertisers that both mediums might be better than just one. "The notion that YouTube can bring new people into a show while also keeping current fans connected presents a big opportunity for both programmers, as well as advertisers, who seek to capture audiences whenever and wherever they watch premium content," said Jonathan Zepp, Google's head of North American partnerships for YouTube. To conduct the study, Nielsen evaluated 30 TV shows—including genres such as comedy, competition, drama and talk shows—while analyzing historical data from YouTube and TV currency data from Nielsen's own sources. Researchers then looked to see how the two formats moved in relationship with each other apart from promotions, seasonality, brand effect and show engagement. Researchers also studied habits of those who watched TV content on YouTube and compared it to those who didn't. The results were "significant," according to the case study of Nielsen's findings.

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3 Brands Using Facebook in Particularly Effective Ways During the Rio Games

August 17, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Thanks to the explosive growth of platforms like Snapchat, Instagram, Twitter and Facebook, the 2016 Rio Games are widely assumed to be the most social ever. And they're also easily the most mobile. Marcos Angelini, the head of Facebook's office in Brazil, said that during the opening ceremony alone, 52 million people had about 110 million interactions on the platform, while another 21 million had 62 million actions on Instagram. (Brazil was the most active country, with about 13 percent of all Brazilian users engaged during the opening ceremony.) All of these interactions provide for a "massive" audience, which Angelini—who spent the past 21 years at Unilever before joining Facebook—said is being thoroughly utilized by brands during the Olympics. Because Facebook is a "natural repository" for sharing stories, Angelini said the Olympics have been an easy pitch for advertisers. (According to Facebook, at least 80 percent of users are connected to at least one business on the platform.) "The world is watching," he said. "We believe we have a very, very important responsibility in making sure that the world watches, that it's engaged with the athletes and the whole organization." On the first day of the games, the top three countries talking about brand sponsors on Facebook were the U.S., Brazil and Mexico.

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Here Are the 10 Buzziest Social Media Moments From U.S. Olympians This Past Week

August 15, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Each week for the Olympics, data and analytics platform ListenFirst is providing Adweek with exclusive analysis of which members of Team USA are getting the most traction on social media. Last week , the heat of 10 was led by gymnast Simone Biles, followed by soccer player Alex Morgan and tennis star Serena Williams. However, during the second week, a few different athletes rose to the top, with gymnast Aly Raisman vaulting to the top spot. Biles remained in the top three, sliding from first to second, while Michael Phelps climbed (or swam) from sixth to third. The rankings are based on each person's digital engagement rating (DER). The rating—based on data from Facebook, Google+, Instagram, Tumblr, Twitter, Wikipedia and YouTube—is a raw aggregate of daily engagements based on owned, earned and organic behavior by consumers. Here are the top 10 for the week of Aug. 8 to Aug

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Snapchat Influencers Start Labeling Social Endorsements as Paid Ads

August 3, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For months, brands have leaned heavily on Snapchat's biggest celebrities to run under-the-radar campaigns that subtly promote their products in the form of sponsored posts that are seen by influencers' millions of followers. Now those creators are beginning to mark branded content with disclaimers that adhere to the Federal Trade Commission's guidelines. Unlike other platforms like Instagram and Twitter where social celebs typically have to clearly label their content as paid endorsements, sponsored content on Snapchat has been murky for marketers until recently. Snapchat doesn't have any strict rules for content creators to abide by, and it can be difficult to find misleading content since posts automatically disappear within 24 hours. But this week, a handful of the platform's biggest stars— Shaun McBride , Josh Peck and the Eh Bee Family—have posted copy that is marked with hashtags such as #paid, #ad and #sponsored to indicate that their posts are paid for by brands. "With more influencers creating content on Snapchat, you're seeing everyone follow along [with FTC guidelines,]" said Nick Cicero, CEO of Delmondo, a startup that pairs up influencers with brands. "The widely accepted industry best practice is still using #ad and you see more influencer campaigns being executed on Snapchat—it's a universal understanding." Yesterday, McBride—the Snapchat artist more commonly known as Shonduras—posted a Snapchat story from a Samsung event in New York that unveiled its new Note 7 smartphone. Before the event, McBride posted a picture with the hashtag #collab to disclose to his fans that he was being paid to post on his Snapchat account. "I usually comply with whatever the brand feels is the right decision," McBride said in an email. McBride's Snapchat story Meanwhile, YouTube and Vine family the Eh Bee Family teased a branded YouTube video created for Nintendo's Mario Kart Battle game on Snapchat yesterday with a single post marked as #paid that was uploaded using the app's recently launched Memories feature. "We just want to be transparent with our fans, and we're glad that we can upload from our camera roll as it allows us to better position FTC disclaimers without ruining the overall experience," the Eh Bee Family said in an emailed statement. Indeed, the number of celebrities disclosing their posts as paid has seemingly grown overnight. Josh Peck and David Lopez are among a handful of celebs promoting a sponsored lens from Amazon today, and Mondelez-owned Sour Patch Kids chose to have music app star Baby Ariel take over the brand's Snapchat account to create a story during Sunday's Teen Choice Awards that she labeled with the hashtag #ad. Social celeb Josh Peck promoted Amazon's Echo. Advertisers and creators have long struggled with labeling so-called native advertising so that it's legally disclosed but doesn't annoy an influencer's millions of followers. When Lord & Taylor failed to acknowledge that it paid 50 bloggers to photograph themselves wearing the same dress, the FTC cracked down on the retailer in March . For its part, Facebook recently loosened its grip on branded content so that publishers and creators can create custom content on the platform that is marked with sponsored tags, similar to YouTube's policies. Snapchat's ephemeral posts and lack of rules on paid content can be particularly tricky for advertisers. Alexa Mehraban, who runs the popular EatingNYC account on Instagram, recently told Adweek that branded content on Snapchat is "still a pretty gray area" compared to Instagram and other social platforms.

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Google’s Ad Revenue Hits $19 Billion, Even as Mobile Continues to Pose Challenges

July 28, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Google is still the primary moneymaker for parent company Alphabet. During the second quarter of 2016, Alphabet's revenue hit $21.5 billion, a 21 percent year-over-year increase. Of that revenue, $19.1 billion came from Google's advertising business, up from $16 billion a year ago. Even as consumers shift toward mobile, Google has struggled to make more money from smartphone-size ads that are typically priced less than desktop ads. During Thursday's earnings call, Google said cost per click was down 7 percent from last year. Meanwhile, aggregate clicks on paid ads increased 29 percent from the second quarter of 2015. And Google saw a 37 percent year-over-year jump in paid clicks on its websites.

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How eBay Crafts Its Social Ads to Target Both Geeky Guys and Fashionistas

July 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Over the past few years, it's become increasingly hard for social marketers to pick which sites and platforms are worth their time and investment and which ones are passing fads (R.I.P. Peach and Yo ). For eBay, its social strategy spans 16 social networks and includes the usual mix of big platforms including Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. But the brand is also putting big money and resources behind smaller, niche sites such as Imgur, We Heart It, Tango and Reddit that target specific audiences. "The ecosystem is fragmented," said Llibert Argerich, global director of social and content at eBay. "There are more and more platforms that cater to more and more specific audiences. Those platforms are fragmented, but they're still very big." Photo-based Imgur, for instance, is geared towards geeky millennial guys and pulls in more than 150 million monthly active users. Meanwhile, female-focused social platform We Heart It hones in on women interested in fashion and lifestyle content, and has more than 40 million users. "I didn't know Imgur 18 months ago," Argerich said. Then in July 2015, eBay ran one of the first promoted posts on Imgur, an online community notoriously averse to advertising. The ad promoted drones and explained the differences between the different types. It generated more than 800 comments. Surprisingly, users weren't turned off from the ads. "We started getting people saying, 'Wow. It's amazing

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Twitter Tests ‘Recommended Video’ Feature During National Shooting Coverage

July 8, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Publishers have flooded Twitter with video clips this week as they cover police shootings of civilians in Louisiana and Minnesota, and a shooting in Dallas Thursday night that killed five police officers. To help viewers stay informed, Twitter has quietly rolled out a recommended video feature that groups similar clips together, much like Facebook's suggested video feature. The videos autoplay silently in Twitter newsfeeds. When users click on a clip, the sound comes on and a landing page appears with more videos at the bottom. Here's what clicking on a clip from ABC News looked like this morning: Twitter did not immediately reply to press inquiries, but the move underscores the growing importance of social video in covering—and learning about—national tragedies. Recommended videos are only running in Twitter's iPhone app, and only appear when users click on clips directly from the newsfeed. They look similar to a feature Facebook rolled out last year called suggested video that bundles clips and ads into a stream. Similar to YouTube's revenue sharing program, Facebook gives publishers 55 percent of the revenue made from those ads. At the time of press, ads were not appearing in Twitter's recommended video player.

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