Posts Tagged ‘technology’

3 Brands Using Facebook in Particularly Effective Ways During the Rio Games

August 17, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Thanks to the explosive growth of platforms like Snapchat, Instagram, Twitter and Facebook, the 2016 Rio Games are widely assumed to be the most social ever. And they're also easily the most mobile. Marcos Angelini, the head of Facebook's office in Brazil, said that during the opening ceremony alone, 52 million people had about 110 million interactions on the platform, while another 21 million had 62 million actions on Instagram. (Brazil was the most active country, with about 13 percent of all Brazilian users engaged during the opening ceremony.) All of these interactions provide for a "massive" audience, which Angelini—who spent the past 21 years at Unilever before joining Facebook—said is being thoroughly utilized by brands during the Olympics. Because Facebook is a "natural repository" for sharing stories, Angelini said the Olympics have been an easy pitch for advertisers. (According to Facebook, at least 80 percent of users are connected to at least one business on the platform.) "The world is watching," he said. "We believe we have a very, very important responsibility in making sure that the world watches, that it's engaged with the athletes and the whole organization." On the first day of the games, the top three countries talking about brand sponsors on Facebook were the U.S., Brazil and Mexico.

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Here Are the 10 Buzziest Social Media Moments From U.S. Olympians This Past Week

August 15, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Each week for the Olympics, data and analytics platform ListenFirst is providing Adweek with exclusive analysis of which members of Team USA are getting the most traction on social media. Last week , the heat of 10 was led by gymnast Simone Biles, followed by soccer player Alex Morgan and tennis star Serena Williams. However, during the second week, a few different athletes rose to the top, with gymnast Aly Raisman vaulting to the top spot. Biles remained in the top three, sliding from first to second, while Michael Phelps climbed (or swam) from sixth to third. The rankings are based on each person's digital engagement rating (DER). The rating—based on data from Facebook, Google+, Instagram, Tumblr, Twitter, Wikipedia and YouTube—is a raw aggregate of daily engagements based on owned, earned and organic behavior by consumers. Here are the top 10 for the week of Aug. 8 to Aug

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Snapchat Influencers Start Labeling Social Endorsements as Paid Ads

August 3, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For months, brands have leaned heavily on Snapchat's biggest celebrities to run under-the-radar campaigns that subtly promote their products in the form of sponsored posts that are seen by influencers' millions of followers. Now those creators are beginning to mark branded content with disclaimers that adhere to the Federal Trade Commission's guidelines. Unlike other platforms like Instagram and Twitter where social celebs typically have to clearly label their content as paid endorsements, sponsored content on Snapchat has been murky for marketers until recently. Snapchat doesn't have any strict rules for content creators to abide by, and it can be difficult to find misleading content since posts automatically disappear within 24 hours. But this week, a handful of the platform's biggest stars— Shaun McBride , Josh Peck and the Eh Bee Family—have posted copy that is marked with hashtags such as #paid, #ad and #sponsored to indicate that their posts are paid for by brands. "With more influencers creating content on Snapchat, you're seeing everyone follow along [with FTC guidelines,]" said Nick Cicero, CEO of Delmondo, a startup that pairs up influencers with brands. "The widely accepted industry best practice is still using #ad and you see more influencer campaigns being executed on Snapchat—it's a universal understanding." Yesterday, McBride—the Snapchat artist more commonly known as Shonduras—posted a Snapchat story from a Samsung event in New York that unveiled its new Note 7 smartphone. Before the event, McBride posted a picture with the hashtag #collab to disclose to his fans that he was being paid to post on his Snapchat account. "I usually comply with whatever the brand feels is the right decision," McBride said in an email. McBride's Snapchat story Meanwhile, YouTube and Vine family the Eh Bee Family teased a branded YouTube video created for Nintendo's Mario Kart Battle game on Snapchat yesterday with a single post marked as #paid that was uploaded using the app's recently launched Memories feature. "We just want to be transparent with our fans, and we're glad that we can upload from our camera roll as it allows us to better position FTC disclaimers without ruining the overall experience," the Eh Bee Family said in an emailed statement. Indeed, the number of celebrities disclosing their posts as paid has seemingly grown overnight. Josh Peck and David Lopez are among a handful of celebs promoting a sponsored lens from Amazon today, and Mondelez-owned Sour Patch Kids chose to have music app Musical.ly star Baby Ariel take over the brand's Snapchat account to create a story during Sunday's Teen Choice Awards that she labeled with the hashtag #ad. Social celeb Josh Peck promoted Amazon's Echo. Advertisers and creators have long struggled with labeling so-called native advertising so that it's legally disclosed but doesn't annoy an influencer's millions of followers. When Lord & Taylor failed to acknowledge that it paid 50 bloggers to photograph themselves wearing the same dress, the FTC cracked down on the retailer in March . For its part, Facebook recently loosened its grip on branded content so that publishers and creators can create custom content on the platform that is marked with sponsored tags, similar to YouTube's policies. Snapchat's ephemeral posts and lack of rules on paid content can be particularly tricky for advertisers. Alexa Mehraban, who runs the popular EatingNYC account on Instagram, recently told Adweek that branded content on Snapchat is "still a pretty gray area" compared to Instagram and other social platforms.

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Google’s Ad Revenue Hits $19 Billion, Even as Mobile Continues to Pose Challenges

July 28, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Google is still the primary moneymaker for parent company Alphabet. During the second quarter of 2016, Alphabet's revenue hit $21.5 billion, a 21 percent year-over-year increase. Of that revenue, $19.1 billion came from Google's advertising business, up from $16 billion a year ago. Even as consumers shift toward mobile, Google has struggled to make more money from smartphone-size ads that are typically priced less than desktop ads. During Thursday's earnings call, Google said cost per click was down 7 percent from last year. Meanwhile, aggregate clicks on paid ads increased 29 percent from the second quarter of 2015. And Google saw a 37 percent year-over-year jump in paid clicks on its websites.

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How eBay Crafts Its Social Ads to Target Both Geeky Guys and Fashionistas

July 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Over the past few years, it's become increasingly hard for social marketers to pick which sites and platforms are worth their time and investment and which ones are passing fads (R.I.P. Peach and Yo ). For eBay, its social strategy spans 16 social networks and includes the usual mix of big platforms including Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. But the brand is also putting big money and resources behind smaller, niche sites such as Imgur, We Heart It, Tango and Reddit that target specific audiences. "The ecosystem is fragmented," said Llibert Argerich, global director of social and content at eBay. "There are more and more platforms that cater to more and more specific audiences. Those platforms are fragmented, but they're still very big." Photo-based Imgur, for instance, is geared towards geeky millennial guys and pulls in more than 150 million monthly active users. Meanwhile, female-focused social platform We Heart It hones in on women interested in fashion and lifestyle content, and has more than 40 million users. "I didn't know Imgur 18 months ago," Argerich said. Then in July 2015, eBay ran one of the first promoted posts on Imgur, an online community notoriously averse to advertising. The ad promoted drones and explained the differences between the different types. It generated more than 800 comments. Surprisingly, users weren't turned off from the ads. "We started getting people saying, 'Wow. It's amazing

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Twitter Tests ‘Recommended Video’ Feature During National Shooting Coverage

July 8, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Publishers have flooded Twitter with video clips this week as they cover police shootings of civilians in Louisiana and Minnesota, and a shooting in Dallas Thursday night that killed five police officers. To help viewers stay informed, Twitter has quietly rolled out a recommended video feature that groups similar clips together, much like Facebook's suggested video feature. The videos autoplay silently in Twitter newsfeeds. When users click on a clip, the sound comes on and a landing page appears with more videos at the bottom. Here's what clicking on a clip from ABC News looked like this morning: Twitter did not immediately reply to press inquiries, but the move underscores the growing importance of social video in covering—and learning about—national tragedies. Recommended videos are only running in Twitter's iPhone app, and only appear when users click on clips directly from the newsfeed. They look similar to a feature Facebook rolled out last year called suggested video that bundles clips and ads into a stream. Similar to YouTube's revenue sharing program, Facebook gives publishers 55 percent of the revenue made from those ads. At the time of press, ads were not appearing in Twitter's recommended video player.

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How This Charity Used a Loophole on Mobile Payment App Venmo to Raise Money

July 7, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It's no surprise that nonprofits operate on shoestring-sized budgets and are constantly working to recruit a new generation of millennial donors. But Water is Life, a charity focused on providing clean water resources, found an interesting way to hack the popular mobile payment app Venmo, which could open the floodgates to creative and stealthy digital marketing from other nonprofits. Last week, the charity teamed up with Deutsch New York to zero in on millennials who use peer-to-peer app Venmo to send each other money. But there was a problem: Venmo doesn't let brands advertise on the app—likely because seeing a flood of ads alongside credit card statements would scare off its users. So, the charity and agency Deutsch found a tiny workaround by keeping a close eye on the app's global news feed, a feature that shows real-time public transactions between Venmo users. Starting on the Fourth of July—a high-traffic time on the app when millennials are paying their friends back for things like beer and food—Deutsch began sending personalized ads disguised as payments to folks who publicized their payments. The team sent each user a 1 cent payment attached to a 2,000-character message tailored to what they recently paid for. For example, the copy sent to someone who recently charged a friend for a beer may have read, "1 cent can't pay someone back for a beer, but it can help buy someone clean water for a day." At the bottom of the message, a call-to-action prompted consumers to donate to Water Is Life by going to a website. Once the tiny payment was sent, the message appeared in the user's news feed where all of their friends could see it, too

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Pinterest Adds a Shopping Cart and Visual Search to Challenge Amazon

June 28, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Shopping is getting easier on Pinterest Pinterest Pinterest has long positioned itself as the go-to platform for social shopping, and today it announced a number of new features that will make buying from the site easier and will also separate itself from competitors Facebook and Twitter. Now people can add items to a shopping cart on Pinterest's website and mobile apps. Consumers can then buy multiple products from different merchants at once, similar to how Amazon's checkout page works. While Google also has a shopping cart, Twitter and Facebook notably do not. In addition, Pinterest is also rolling out a feature that uses visual search to let people search for similar items shown within a post. For example, someone looking for a pair of shoes featured within a pin will be able to search for similar items on Pinterest by clicking on a button in the top right-hand corner of the screen. Pinterest is also building new technology for phones—not unlike Amazon's Firefly visual search technology—that will help users find online products by snapping a photo of something in the real world.

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Infographic: From Town Halls to Targeting, Political Advertising Has Come a Long Way

June 28, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Long before the birth of Facebook Live town halls, there were town halls in real life. Before there were digital ads, there were plenty of those paper ones, minus all the creepy targeting based on what we buy, view and even eat . And then of course, before there were hashtags, there were slogans like "Who is James Polk?" Videology , a digital video ad platform that works with political campaigns on both sides of the aisle, took a look at the evolution of political advertising all the way back to before the United States of America was even a thing. "We think of advertising from a political standpoint as something that's been done since the days of Hamilton," Mark McKee, Videology's svp of North America, said in an interview. "But the reality is we've made so much progress in a short amount of time, whether it be use of data, use of internet, use of social." This year, candidates are innovating yet again with digital ad spending for programmatic and addressable television. According to a new report from eMarketer released today, overall programmatic spending on TV ads (not just for politics) is expected to grow 127.8 percent to $710 million. However, at only one percent of total TV spend, it's still just a small number. Meanwhile, eMarketer predicts programmatic digital video this year will total $5.51 billion, or about 56 percent of total digital video ad spending. That's all good news for Videology, which will likely benefit from the digital push from both parties. (After all, the company says it's bipartisan.) Campaign spending on digital ads alone in 2016 is expected to for the first time hit $1 billion —a high jump from the $160 million spent in 2012 .

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Inside ‘The Next Rembrandt': How JWT Got a Computer to Paint Like the Old Master

June 27, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

CANNES, France—Rembrandt van Rijn finished his last painting in 1669, the year he died. So it was enthralling, and a little unsettling, to step on to a boat at the Cannes Lions festival for a private viewing of the first new Rembrandt in 347 years. In a fascinating merging of creativity and technology, the humans at J. Walter Thompson Amsterdam taught a computer to paint like Rembrandt by having it study the old master's works for months. The resulting painting is a completely new portrait, not a replica, and it's indistinguishable—to my eye, at least—from the real thing.

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