Posts Tagged ‘technology’

Target and Lancome Produce Snapchat’s First Ecommerce Ads

April 29, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After slowly testing more interactive ads in recent months, Snapchat is open for ecommerce. Lancome and Target started running shoppable ads today within Cosmopolitan's Discover channel—the hub of the app where media brands publish daily stories. Like Discover's other ads, Lancome and Target's promos appear between Cosmo's articles and videos, each with a 10-second call-to-action instructing viewers to "swipe up" for more. Copy on Target's ad reads, "New products every week." Swiping down on the screen pulls up a loading page with Target's mobile site where people can shop the products featured in the ad—like plant stands and water bottles. Lancome's ad promotes a lip product called Juicy Shaker. Similar to Target's ad, people can shop the beauty company's site without leaving Snapchat. While creative on Snapchat is still relatively limited—ads, just like content, are capped at 10 seconds—Snapchat has experimented over the past few months with similar ads that ask consumers to 'swipe up" for more content. In November, Activision tested the first longer-length video on the platform, and a number of advertisers— particularly entertainment brands —have run similar campaigns since then. Then in February, mobile game Cookie Jam became the first advertiser to run app-install ads . Shortly afterward, shopping app Spring and ticketing company Gametime ran app-based campaigns, indicating that ecommerce ads may be coming soon. Last month, AT&T tested another type of swipeable ad with an article attached that's akin to a piece of branded content. It's been a busy week for Snapchat. On Thursday, the app announced users watch 10 billion videos every day, and 60 percent of its daily active users create content every day. The messaging app also inked a deal with NBC to broadcast clips from the upcoming 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio

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YouTube Builds ‘Little Haikus of Video’ With New 6-Second Mobile Ads

April 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As more video consumption moves to mobile, YouTube has a new ad format for brands designed specifically for quick snippets of content. Today it's launching Bumper ads—six-second, unskippable video ads—that run before videos, similar to YouTube's skippable TrueView ads. Unlike TrueView—which lets advertisers create an ad of any length—Bumper caps promos at six seconds, which could force marketers to build campaigns with mobile in mind, since smartphone users have shorter attention spans. YouTube describes the new ad format as "little haikus of video ads" and will start rolling them out to advertisers this month. Media buyers can buy them through Google AdWords. Bumper ads are geared towards advertisers interested in testing the difference between TrueView and shorter video clips. For example, Audi Germany has been testing the ads, and chose to run a 45-second TV spot as TrueView ads. But with the six-second format, the brand focused on two shots—one of a soccer player and one of car spinning in a circle. Atlantic Records has also used the new format to slice up clips from a campaign that launched a new album for English band Rudimental. According to YouTube, early tests with bumper ads are particularly effective when, surprise, paired with TrueView and Google Preferred ads—its premium ads that run alongside the platform's most popular content from creators. "Bumper ads are ideal for driving incremental reach and frequency, especially on mobile, where 'snackable videos' perform well," Zach Lupei, product manger of video ads at Google, said in a blog post. "In early tests, Bumpers drove strong lift in upper funnel metrics like recall, awareness and consideration—complementing TrueView's strength in driving middle and lower funnel metrics like favorability and purchase intent."

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NBCUniversal Will Start Selling TV Advertising Programmatically This Fall

February 24, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After two years of selling its digital video and display inventory programmatically, NBCUniversal is finally allowing programmatic buys on its linear networks as well. Today, the company announced NBCUx for Linear TV, which will launch as part of this year's upfront. "It's the industry's first national programmatic TV offering at scale," Krishan Bhatia, evp of business operations and strategy, said during a conference call with reporters. It's an extension of NBCUx, which the company launched last year as a digital programmatic offering, after making its digital video and display inventory available for programmatic buying two years ago. "We've seen great success with it, and now we're extending those capabilities to linear television," said Bhatia. He said that starting in the fall, "advertisers will be able to use data and automation to build media plans for our premium linear TV inventory across NBCUniversal's entire portfolio of cable and broadcast networks." The fall start date means the technology won't be available for advertisers to use during the Summer Olympics in August. NBCU's data offerings, which also include ATP, its audience targeting platform, and its addressable NBCU+ Powered by Comcast platform, represent "a sea change in thinking about how we create value for our customers," said Dan Lovinger, evp, entertainment ad sales group. "Our advertiser partners have been asking for help with automating their media planning and buying in a data-informed way, and we expect that by adding premium TV inventory to our offering, we'll provide the help that they're seeking." As part of the new offering, "select advertisers now will be enabled to include traditional TV inventory in their automated media plans via a private exchange using a combination of their own data, third-party data sources and NBCUniversal's premium television inventory," said Lovinger. NBCU will make its inventory and pricing information available to "a select set of demand-side platforms," and the company's client and agency partners can combine that information with their own data sources to build a media plan against their own data sets and target audiences. "Then, those agencies and clients will issue a media plan that will be subject to inventory availability and pricing at the time and approval on our part," said Bhatia. While it automates only part of the linear television workflow process, he called it "a big step in terms of making that process simpler." Lovinger said the company wasn't worried that clients using the technology could ultimately save more money than NBCUniversal would like. "We feel that we've got a complete hold on what we're doing here," he said.

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Squarespace Celebrates Leon Bridges’ Meteoric Rise to Nominee in Grammys Ad

February 15, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It would be unfair to call the rise of Leon Bridges a Cinderella story. The talented young soul singer has worked far too hard to explain it away to miracles and magic. And yet, the arc of the first part of his career has been nothing short of miraculous and magical. A little over a year ago, Bridges was washing dishes at a Tex-Mex restaurant in Fort Worth, Texas, and playing open mics after every Tuesday shift. But tonight, he'll be under a different spotlight in Los Angeles, where he's up for best R&B album at the 58th Annual Grammy Awards . To celebrate the achievement, website design platform Squarespace and Austin, Texas-based agency Preacher have partnered with Bridges—a longtime Squarespace customer—to recreate the past year in the form of a 30-second spot that will air during the awards show. An extended version of the commercial can be seen online, with a short documentary also in the works. "It's so surreal being in that same place and having no idea I'd be here now," Bridges told Adweek. "If you would have told me I'd be playing to a crowd of thousands, I would have run the other direction, you know? I would have been like, 'No, you're lying, you're lying, you're lying.' It's pretty crazy to look at that video and reflect on how everything happens." It wasn't all that long ago that Bridges was just playing coffee shops. (Last March, he was playing to a crowd of 200 or so at a college cafe in Western Tennessee.) But things are different now: When his new tour schedule was released Friday, more than half of the shows sold out by the end of the day. The history of Bridges and Squarespace date back to his early coffee-shop days

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Les Moonves Is Named Chairman of CBS, Replacing Sumner Redstone

February 3, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Les Moonves, CBS Corp.'s CEO and president, has been named chairman of the company. He replaces the ailing Sumner Redstone, who resigned Tuesday as executive chairman, but will remain as chairman emeritus. Moonves, who joined CBS in 1995 as CBS Entertainment president, was unanimously elected by the CBS board after being nominated by Shari Redstone, Sumner Redstone's daughter and vice chair of the board. Moonves will continue on as CEO and president. Redstone, who is 92, also served as executive chairman of Viacom (when CBS and Viacom split in 2005, he was chairman of both companies), but there is no word yet about his future at that company. UPDATE: "The Viacom board of directors is scheduled to meet tomorrow," Viacom said in a statement late Wednesday afternoon

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Scripps Launches TV Everywhere, Complete With Targeted Advertising

September 1, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Another TV company is diving into TV Everywhere, with Scripps Networks Interactive now offering livestreaming of HGTV, Travel Channel, Food Network, DIY Network and Cooking Channel. TV Everywhere platform provider Anvato is powering the livestreaming—and dynamic ad insertion, or DAI—on each network's website, along with the iOS and Android apps for HGTV, Food Network and Travel Channel The livestreaming was soft launched in June, said Matt Smith, chief evangelist at Anvato. Scripps' embrace of all things TV Everywhere, including DAI—in which linear ads are replaced by advertisements targeted specifically at the nonlinear audience—shows how much has shifted in the TV Everywhere universe since networks first started experimenting with livestreaming. "The last couple years, you've had brands big and small say, 'Okay, we're going to stream. Let's get it done and we'll figure out how to make money later,'" Smith said. "Scripps looked at this and said, 'This isn't just about extending the brand

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Twitch, HBO Partner to Promote ‘Silicon Valley’

April 3, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Silicon Valley is hoping it can get tech and video game nerds to unite, with a little help from streaming video platform Twitch . To promote the second season of the HBO comedy series—which will debut on April 12— the stars of Silicon Valley will livestream a Q&A for the Twitch community and debut an exclusive clip from an upcoming episode. (And, of course, they'll be playing video games with Twitch's live programming director and host Jon Carnage during the program.) To introduce new viewers to the series and jog the memory of fans, the platform will also livestream the show's pilot episode, marking the first time a network has done so on the platform. "There is an authentic connection between Silicon Valley and the Twitch audience, and this unique event is a great way to build upon that," Sabrina Caluori, HBO vice president, digital and social media, said in a release. "Twitch offers a unique opportunity to provide exclusive content and a highly social experience to this influential community." The idea of Silicon Valley coming to Twitch isn't that far of a stretch, considering actor Thomas Middleditch (who plays main star Richard Hendricks on the show) already is a streamer on the site. But, more importantly, it shows that Twitch can be used for different marketing techniques besides traditional pre-roll and banner ads. And it highlights its livestreaming capabilities, which have garnered buzz thanks to the releases of Periscope and Meerkat . More than 1.5 million broadcasters use Twitch to share content, and it gets over 100 million unique viewers a month. The platform recently made headlines when Amazon purchased it

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Study: Young People Watch More Than 22 Hours of Online Video a Week

March 30, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

A new study shows that watching content online instead of on TV is the new normal for young millennials and even younger Gen Zers. Just how much digital video are they watching? The average survey taker viewed 11.3 hours of free online video (on sites like YouTube) and 10.8 hours of subscription video (on sites like Netflix) for a staggering total of 22 hours a week. By comparison, that same survey group—1,350 people between the ages of 13 and 24—viewed an average 8.3 hours of scheduled linear TV content, according to the third annual Acumen Report. And of that, 6.4 hours happened online. While almost everyone surveyed said they watch digital content, a little more than half reported watching TV. "Whether you're a marketer or a content creator, the results magnify the growing influence of these millennial consumers and further affirmation that traditional media is falling short with this audience," said Andy Tu, evp of marketing for Defy Media, an online video production house that commissioned the study.

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Kal Penn Is Bringing Big Data to the Masses With New Nat Geo Show

March 24, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who Kal Penn Age 37 Claim to fame Host and producer of National Geographic Channel's The Big Picture with Kal Penn

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Google Fiber May Have Created a Game-Changer: Real Measurement of TV Ad Views

March 20, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Want to know exactly how many people saw your ad on TV? Want dynamic insertion? The answer has long been "tough luck." But now it's possible ... in Kansas City. Adweek has learned that Google will be rolling out a TV ad-tracking system similar to the technology used to measure ad views online, giving the company a more accurate idea of how many people are watching the ad inventory it sells in Kansas City than traditional panel measurement ever could. This is a big deal: TV measurement has been changing rapidly in the past few years, but the traditional gross ratings point, which relies on a panel of Nielsen viewers small enough to create problems for networks without multimillion-viewer bases, is still the industry standard. Relatively few households have Nielsen boxes; every household with Google Fiber, obviously, has a Google Fiber box. And that box can put the ad in whenever it's timely, and tell the client about it. "Fiber TV ads will be digitally delivered in real time and can be matched based on geography, the type of program being shown (sports, news, etc.), or viewing history," the company explains in a blog post set to go live this afternoon. "Like digital ads, advertisers will only pay for ads that have been shown, and can limit the number of times an ad is shown to a given TV. We're excited to see how this test progresses, and we're looking forward to hearing from local businesses and viewers along the way." Viewers can opt out of being shown ads based on their viewing history, the company says

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