Posts Tagged ‘technology’

How eBay Crafts Its Social Ads to Target Both Geeky Guys and Fashionistas

July 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Over the past few years, it's become increasingly hard for social marketers to pick which sites and platforms are worth their time and investment and which ones are passing fads (R.I.P. Peach and Yo ). For eBay, its social strategy spans 16 social networks and includes the usual mix of big platforms including Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, YouTube and Pinterest. But the brand is also putting big money and resources behind smaller, niche sites such as Imgur, We Heart It, Tango and Reddit that target specific audiences. "The ecosystem is fragmented," said Llibert Argerich, global director of social and content at eBay. "There are more and more platforms that cater to more and more specific audiences. Those platforms are fragmented, but they're still very big." Photo-based Imgur, for instance, is geared towards geeky millennial guys and pulls in more than 150 million monthly active users. Meanwhile, female-focused social platform We Heart It hones in on women interested in fashion and lifestyle content, and has more than 40 million users. "I didn't know Imgur 18 months ago," Argerich said. Then in July 2015, eBay ran one of the first promoted posts on Imgur, an online community notoriously averse to advertising. The ad promoted drones and explained the differences between the different types. It generated more than 800 comments. Surprisingly, users weren't turned off from the ads. "We started getting people saying, 'Wow. It's amazing

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Twitter Tests ‘Recommended Video’ Feature During National Shooting Coverage

July 8, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Publishers have flooded Twitter with video clips this week as they cover police shootings of civilians in Louisiana and Minnesota, and a shooting in Dallas Thursday night that killed five police officers. To help viewers stay informed, Twitter has quietly rolled out a recommended video feature that groups similar clips together, much like Facebook's suggested video feature. The videos autoplay silently in Twitter newsfeeds. When users click on a clip, the sound comes on and a landing page appears with more videos at the bottom. Here's what clicking on a clip from ABC News looked like this morning: Twitter did not immediately reply to press inquiries, but the move underscores the growing importance of social video in covering—and learning about—national tragedies. Recommended videos are only running in Twitter's iPhone app, and only appear when users click on clips directly from the newsfeed. They look similar to a feature Facebook rolled out last year called suggested video that bundles clips and ads into a stream. Similar to YouTube's revenue sharing program, Facebook gives publishers 55 percent of the revenue made from those ads. At the time of press, ads were not appearing in Twitter's recommended video player.

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How This Charity Used a Loophole on Mobile Payment App Venmo to Raise Money

July 7, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It's no surprise that nonprofits operate on shoestring-sized budgets and are constantly working to recruit a new generation of millennial donors. But Water is Life, a charity focused on providing clean water resources, found an interesting way to hack the popular mobile payment app Venmo, which could open the floodgates to creative and stealthy digital marketing from other nonprofits. Last week, the charity teamed up with Deutsch New York to zero in on millennials who use peer-to-peer app Venmo to send each other money. But there was a problem: Venmo doesn't let brands advertise on the app—likely because seeing a flood of ads alongside credit card statements would scare off its users. So, the charity and agency Deutsch found a tiny workaround by keeping a close eye on the app's global news feed, a feature that shows real-time public transactions between Venmo users. Starting on the Fourth of July—a high-traffic time on the app when millennials are paying their friends back for things like beer and food—Deutsch began sending personalized ads disguised as payments to folks who publicized their payments. The team sent each user a 1 cent payment attached to a 2,000-character message tailored to what they recently paid for. For example, the copy sent to someone who recently charged a friend for a beer may have read, "1 cent can't pay someone back for a beer, but it can help buy someone clean water for a day." At the bottom of the message, a call-to-action prompted consumers to donate to Water Is Life by going to a website. Once the tiny payment was sent, the message appeared in the user's news feed where all of their friends could see it, too

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Pinterest Adds a Shopping Cart and Visual Search to Challenge Amazon

June 28, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Shopping is getting easier on Pinterest Pinterest Pinterest has long positioned itself as the go-to platform for social shopping, and today it announced a number of new features that will make buying from the site easier and will also separate itself from competitors Facebook and Twitter. Now people can add items to a shopping cart on Pinterest's website and mobile apps. Consumers can then buy multiple products from different merchants at once, similar to how Amazon's checkout page works. While Google also has a shopping cart, Twitter and Facebook notably do not. In addition, Pinterest is also rolling out a feature that uses visual search to let people search for similar items shown within a post. For example, someone looking for a pair of shoes featured within a pin will be able to search for similar items on Pinterest by clicking on a button in the top right-hand corner of the screen. Pinterest is also building new technology for phones—not unlike Amazon's Firefly visual search technology—that will help users find online products by snapping a photo of something in the real world.

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Infographic: From Town Halls to Targeting, Political Advertising Has Come a Long Way

June 28, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Long before the birth of Facebook Live town halls, there were town halls in real life. Before there were digital ads, there were plenty of those paper ones, minus all the creepy targeting based on what we buy, view and even eat . And then of course, before there were hashtags, there were slogans like "Who is James Polk?" Videology , a digital video ad platform that works with political campaigns on both sides of the aisle, took a look at the evolution of political advertising all the way back to before the United States of America was even a thing. "We think of advertising from a political standpoint as something that's been done since the days of Hamilton," Mark McKee, Videology's svp of North America, said in an interview. "But the reality is we've made so much progress in a short amount of time, whether it be use of data, use of internet, use of social." This year, candidates are innovating yet again with digital ad spending for programmatic and addressable television. According to a new report from eMarketer released today, overall programmatic spending on TV ads (not just for politics) is expected to grow 127.8 percent to $710 million. However, at only one percent of total TV spend, it's still just a small number. Meanwhile, eMarketer predicts programmatic digital video this year will total $5.51 billion, or about 56 percent of total digital video ad spending. That's all good news for Videology, which will likely benefit from the digital push from both parties. (After all, the company says it's bipartisan.) Campaign spending on digital ads alone in 2016 is expected to for the first time hit $1 billion —a high jump from the $160 million spent in 2012 .

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Inside ‘The Next Rembrandt': How JWT Got a Computer to Paint Like the Old Master

June 27, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

CANNES, France—Rembrandt van Rijn finished his last painting in 1669, the year he died. So it was enthralling, and a little unsettling, to step on to a boat at the Cannes Lions festival for a private viewing of the first new Rembrandt in 347 years. In a fascinating merging of creativity and technology, the humans at J. Walter Thompson Amsterdam taught a computer to paint like Rembrandt by having it study the old master's works for months. The resulting painting is a completely new portrait, not a replica, and it's indistinguishable—to my eye, at least—from the real thing.

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Why Big Brands Are Suddenly Getting Cozy With Reddit

June 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just six months ago, Reddit—whose famous slogan is "The front page of the internet"—was a dangerous place for marketers because of its reputation as a pool of trolling and harassment. Now, the viral-minded site is trying to flip the narrative and draw in advertisers with new ad targeting and buying technology and an in-house studio that specializes in creating custom content. And heavy-hitter brands including Coca-Cola, eBay and Procter & Gamble have all come on board in recent months. "What makes Reddit distinct from an advertising perspective are the same qualities that make it distinct in organic spaces," explained Zubair Jandali, vp of sales at Reddit. "We have 70,000 active communities—few places on the web have audiences that are as passionate as ours." Data backs up Jandali's claim. The publisher's traffic hit 51.4 million monthly users in May, up from 28.4 million a year before, according to comScore. It's the kind of stat that seemingly flies in the face of accusations that Reddit's audience is too niche—and sometimes too cruel—for brands to take seriously. But the goal is simple: capitalize on the massive momentum around native advertising with a specialized team to create content, much like the in-house agencies that have made big-name publishers including The New York Times, The Atlantic and Vox Media leaders in the space

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6 Father’s Day Gift Ideas for Creative and Techie Dads

June 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

This week, the Adweek staff is highlighting Bel & Bel's Vespa-inspired desk chair, a smart grill and more goods that are perfect for Father's Day gifting.

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Why Vice Won’t Have Reviews on Its Upcoming Gaming Channel

June 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It already counts 11 verticals covering everything from news and sports to women's issues, music, food and tech. Now Vice is planning to expand its scope even further, pulling back the curtain today on a gaming vertical that was first announced at the company's NewFront presentation last month. The as-yet unnamed channel, set to fully launch in the fall, will focus on gaming culture, big and small, through personal storytelling. "It's probably the biggest medium today for communications," Joel Fowler, publisher of the new vertical, told Adweek. Fowler also runs Vice's EDM and culture channel, Thump. Vice already produces gaming-related content for Motherboard and The Creators Project , but will now have its own "dedicated place where we can devote resources," explained Fowler. "We see it more as doubling down on all the gaming content that we've been doing." Vice is debuting the first episode of Pixel by Pixel, the first video series for the vertical, during this year's Electronic Entertainment Expo, or E3. Vice partnered with Twitch to stream the episode live during its E3 broadcast later this afternoon. The series profiles indie game developers in the weeks leading up to the release of their projects. The first episode follows Alex Preston, creator of Hyper Light Drifter. The game is autobiographical in nature. Preston was born with a serious congenital heart defect. The game's main character confronts challenges he must resolve before he dies. Vice will roll out the first episode for each of the five new shows in the coming months leading up to the site's launch; all five videos will be sponsored by Taco Bell. By late summer, Vice will debut the first episode of esports-themed series Versus, which will center on the game Smite.

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Infographic: Who’s Winning the Race on YouTube, Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump?

June 9, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Donald Trump is usually quick to boast about how much he's winning—in politics, in business, etc., etc., etc. But now, it appears he's winning on YouTube as well, according to web analytics firm Zefr. Zefr's analysis of YouTube views for the month of May found that videos about the presumptive Republican nominee have amassed many millions more views than the combined total of Democrat rivals Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. Views of Trump-related videos increased by 42.8 percent from April to May to a total of 254 million. Meanwhile, the total 106 million views of Clinton-related videos were only up 0.68 percent from the previous month. Total views for Sanders videos fell 16.25 percent to 69.7 million. "If all publicity is indeed good publicity, then Trump has a huge advantage," said Dave Rosner, Zefr's evp of strategic marketing. However, nearly half of Trump-related views (47 percent) were for videos that expressed a negative sentiment about the candidate, while only 17 percent were positive. (The remaining 36 percent were neutral.) For Clinton, sentiment was even more negative—48 percent compared with 4 percent positive and 47 percent neutral

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