Posts Tagged ‘technology’

GoPro and the NHL Have Signed a Deal That Will Give Hockey Fans a Player’s POV

September 29, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Ever wonder what’s it like to be Patrick Kane of the Chicago Blackhawks streaking in on a breakaway? Or New York Rangers goalie Henrik Lundqvist blocking a 100 mph shot? The NHL has struck a content-sharing deal with GoPro cameras to offer TV viewers exactly that kind of player point of view this season. The NHL will use GoPro’s POV footage in promo campaigns for the new season starting Oct. 8. The league’s two national TV partners—NBC Sports in the U.S. and Rogers in Canada—will also weave clips into game telecasts to illustrate the shooting, stickhandling and skating skills of NHL stars, said Bob Chesterman, NHL’s svp of programming. During the recent NHL/NHLPA Player Media Tour, GoPro techs outfitted nearly a dozen top stars with mini-cameras on their helmets, masks and jerseys at Newark’s Prudential Center. If a player filmed by GoPro scores this season, NBC or Rogers can illustrate what they saw on the play by cutting to taped footage from the commercial shoot, said Brian Jennings, NHL’s CMO. The league will also feature the POV content on NHL Network and NHL.com, while GoPro will use it on its YouTube channel. The GoPro mini-cameras capture images that were “unimaginable” before, said Jennings. “The [technology] demystifies our game—and truly shows what skill our players have,” he said. GoPro cut its teeth on action sports such as surfing. But it’s expanding with pro sports leagues such as the NHL and NFL, said Wil Tidman, GoPro’s head of production. Lundqvist, who led the Rangers to the Stanley Cup Finals, can’t wait to see the footage himself. “It can definitely help the game become even more interesting for the viewer, no question.”

Read More

How Shane Smith Built Vice Into a $2.5 Billion Empire

September 29, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

By now, you’ve no doubt heard about Vice’s humble beginnings. It’s 1994 in Montreal, and three guys—Shane Smith, Gavin McInnes and Suroosh Alvi—decide to launch a free punk magazine called the Voice of Montreal. Two years later, the magazine drops the “o,” changing its name to Vice. By 2014, the operation—having since relocated to New York and now known as Vice Media —has become a platform-spanning news and entertainment group valued at more than $2.5 billion. Photo: Sasha Maslov What that brief history doesn’t convey is just how unique a company Vice is. At a time when many legacy media organizations are struggling to stay afloat, Vice has found that magical point of convergence where good journalism, positive cash flow and (most elusive of all) the millennial attention span meet. In the past year alone, Vice Media has launched a full-fledged news division, announced plans for a 24-hour news network and raised $500 million from investors A&E Networks (“It cannot be underestimated their ability to reach a very hard-to-reach audience,” says A&E CEO Nancy Dubuc) and venture capital firm Technology Crossover Ventures. For the company to have reached this point is largely due to CEO Smith, who has emerged as Vice’s tatted-up chieftain. The way Smith sees it, there’s little about the Vice formula that’s magic. “We look at it very simply. We want to do three things. We want to make good content, we want to have as many eyeballs as possible see that content, and we want to make money so that we can keep paying to do that content,” he says. Vice Squad | Vice's brilliant edgy content has made it a hit among elusive millenials. Photo: Vice Productions Not only has Vice mastered those things, but it has also managed to do so without losing the countercultural cred that made it a hit in the first place, first among X-ers, then among the coveted millennial demo. On a given day, Vice.com features provocative headlines like “I Went to a Blowjob Bar in Bangkok, Thailand” and “We Asked Drug Addicts to Rate the Music at Copenhagen Central” alongside news about unrest in the Middle East

Read More

Shonda Rhimes Sounds Off on Social About Being Mischaracterized as an ‘Angry Black Woman’

September 19, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Shonda Rhimes

Read More

China’s Huayi to Pay $125 Million for D-Cinema Group GDC Technology

September 17, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Huayi Brothers Media is to pay up to $125 million for GDC Technology, a manufacturer of servers and equipment for digital cinema

Read More

Simulmedia’s New CMO Sees the Future of TV

September 8, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who

Read More

HBO: Vice Funding from A+E, TCV Has ‘No Impact’ on Series

September 4, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

HBO said the Emmy-winning “Vice” series on the premium cable channel will continue for at least two more seasons, with its status unaffected by the $500 million investments in Vice Media from A+E Networks and Technology Crossover Ventures. The funding, announced Thursday, “has no impact on the series,” an HBO rep said. In May, HBO... Read more

Read More

How CNN and Cisco Made A Web Series About Progressive Cities

July 18, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

During

Read More

How CNN Made a Cisco-Sponsored Web Series About Progressive Cities

July 18, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

During

Read More

Sneaky Facebook Study on Users’ Emotions Draws Ire

June 30, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If you use Facebook and found yourself momentarily feeling either better or worse in early 2012, an algorithm may have caused your shift in mood. And that's what has some social media users upset today. A controversial research study published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) on June 17 started to gain digital traction over the weekend. It revealed that Facebook for one week in January 2012 worked with Cornell University and the University of California-San Francisco to test the emotional reactions of nearly 700,000 users to pieces of content. The users weren't notified of their participation and unknowingly helped the researchers learn that people who read fewer positive words were found to write more negative posts, while the reverse occurred when consumers were exposed to fewer negative sentiments. The information-gathering practice isn't likely to be illegal since Facebook users sign away many privacy rights when they agree to participate on the social platform. And the study's gray ethical issues can be probably be debated ad nauseam.

Read More

Aereo Presses the Pause Button

June 28, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With the Supreme Court on Wednesday effectively putting the kibosh on Aereo's streaming services, CEO Chet Kanojia announced that at 11:30 a.m. today Aereo would " pause operations temporarily" until it can

Read More