Posts Tagged ‘tech’

Infographic: What Consumers Really Think About VR

April 24, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Virtual reality has been all the rage among the tech cognoscenti over the past few years, but the real test of VR's value is whether consumers will catch on. Looking to gauge the public's feelings about this emerging technology, research-based consultancy Magid surveyed two groups of 1,000 people ages 18-64 about VR, conducting one wave...

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Apple Talks Up Its Environmental Efforts in Charming Animated Stories for Earth Day

April 22, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It took Apple a while to properly commit to manufacturing policies that help protect the environment, but in recent years it's made significant progress--and has been broadcasting that fact, particularly on Earth Day. For Earth Day 2017, the tech giant has rolled out four charming animated videos explaining some of its green initiatives, narrated by...

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How the Founder of a Failed Education Startup Created the Hottest New Social Network for Teens

March 17, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Like many young entrepreneurs in the tech field, Alex Zhu, the founder and CEO of Musical.ly, was looking for that one big idea that could change the world. He settled on an education app--it was a popular idea; he secured investors, built a team and launched a product. And it was a total failure. Turns...

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Google Wants to Give You Better Control Over the Personalized Ads You See

July 1, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Google is changing the way it stores the information it collects while also giving users the ability to update their privacy settings. The search engine giant is introducing a feature that lets users opt in to a new way of storing info that over time could lead to ads that are more personalized for individuals. The company is already collecting massive amounts of information about each user's search activity, Gmail messages and YouTube views, but according to a source, the update will change what information is associated with a user's account instead of having data for each Google product stored separately. According to the source, the feature is rolling out in the coming weeks and will ask users if they want to opt in. If they don't, the user's privacy settings will remain the same.

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Yahoo Shutters Screen, Scales Back Original Series

January 4, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just four days into 2016, Yahoo is making good on a plans announced at the end of 2015. The struggling tech giant has shut down Yahoo Screen, a 5-year-old digital video platform that housed its original series, its first livestream of an NFL game, and old episodes of Saturday Night Live. The remaining video properties on Yahoo Screen will be moved to the company's digital magazines, so like-minded content will exist side by side. "At Yahoo, we're constantly reviewing and iterating on our products as we strive to create the best user experience," said a Yahoo rep. "With that in mind, video content from Yahoo as well as our partners has been transitioned from Yahoo Screen to our Digital Magazine properties so users can discover complementary content in one place." The shutdown of Yahoo Screen, first reported by Variety, comes after a year in which the tech giant attempted to break into original content with the revival of NBC sitcom Community, the NBA-themed series Sin City Saints, and sci-fi comedy Other Space (from Ghostbusters director Paul Feig). It's a blow to the tumultuous tenure of CEO Marissa Mayer, for whom original video had been a priority. Despite the three original series, as well as a licensing deal with Viacom for Comedy Central shows and the entire catalogue of Saturday Night Live, Yahoo simply couldn't compete with streaming giants Netflix, Amazon Prime and even Hulu. Yahoo's originals contributed to a $42 million write down for the company last year. CFO Ken Goldman admitted at the time he "couldn't see a way to make money over time" on pricey original series

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Will Programmatic Advertising Take Over TV?

June 24, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Illustration: Alvaro Dominguez YES Who needs ratings when you can buy TV impressions? All you need is a defined audience, the ability to deliver an ad wherever a person is viewing and automation to deliver that ad millions of times across multiple channels. Those are the basics of a programmatic vision for television—a vision that doesn’t care which show a viewer is tuned to but only who that viewer is. Programmatic is eating the media world , and that means television, too. Media buyers, advertisers and tech companies are preparing for a future that’s platform agnostic, that distributes digital video spots across screens whenever a person fires up a smartphone, tablet, connected TV or cable box. The question “Will TV embrace programmatic?” misses the reality: The medium already embraces it. Just last week, Clypd launched a software interface for ad buyers to place automated orders for TV ad space

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Prime Focus Technologies to Acquire DAX

March 11, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Prime Focus Technologies, the tech arm of Prime Focus, announced Monday that it has inked a deal to acquire DAX, whose services include cloud-based production workflow and media asset management applications. PFT will acquire all DAX assets for $9.1 million, in addition to performance-based payouts.  Cash flow from North American operations will support the payment.... Read more

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Join NYC Talks for Our First Networking Event of 2014

Join NYC Talks for Our First Networking Event of 2014

Super Bowl Gathering
January 22, 2014  |  Blog, Engage, Networking, Talk NYC Events  |  No Comments

We are excited to announce our first networking event of 2014! Mark your calendars for January 29th at the Ainsworth and start Super Bowl weekend a little early this year! Come for the free happy hour and to network with New York's top innovators and thought leaders in the digital sphere, and stay to learn more about the Talk NYC ENGAGE: Digital Storytelling Conference in April.

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Top Products in Two Decades of Tech Reviews

December 18, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

This is my last column for The Wall Street Journal, after 22 years of reviewing consumer technology products here. So I thought I’d talk about the dozen personal-technology products I reviewed that were most influential over the past two decades. Obviously, narrowing so many products in the most dynamic of modern industries down to 12 is a subjective exercise and others will disagree. Though most were hits, a couple weren’t blockbusters, financially, and one was an outright flop. Instead, I used as my criteria two main things. First, the products had to improve ease of use and add value for average consumers. That was the guiding principle I laid down in the first sentence of my first column, in 1991: “Personal computers are just too hard to use, and it’s not your fault.” Second, I chose these 12 because each changed the course of digital history by influencing the products and services that followed, or by changing the way people lived and worked. In some cases, the impact of these mass-market products is still unfolding. All of these products had predecessors, but they managed to take their categories to a new level. Some readers will complain that Apple is overrepresented. My answer: Apple introduced more influential, breakthrough products for average consumers than any other company over the years of this column.

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With Microsoft CEO Race in Home Stretch and Mulally Fading, Here’s My Dark-Horse Pick: VMware’s Gelsinger

December 12, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

A few weeks ago, I wrote a piece about the possibility of an outsider dark-horse candidate emerging in the race to become CEO of Microsoft. Now it might be more of a possibility than ever before, tracking on sources inside the company that have consistently said that there is a male tech executive in the running who has not been named publicly as yet. Said one person about this candidate: He is “in tech, someone folks are excited about, but not a done deal.” By definition, the term “dark horse” is meant to describe a come-out-of-nowhere winner, or, as Wikipedia notes , “a race horse that is not known to gamblers and thus is difficult to place betting odds on.” And make no mistake, this CEO search has turned into a race, with the variety of candidates pulling ahead and then falling behind, with all of them jockeying for position, as the crowd of investors and insiders have also tried to put their own fix in. At the time of my post in mid-November, Ford CEO Alan Mulally was the clear front runner of the process to replace outgoing CEO Steve Ballmer. Also in that mix: Enterprise chief Satya Nadella; COO Kevin Turner; strategy exec Tony Bates (whom I have dubbed the Silicon Valley choice); and Nokia exec Stephen Elop. Elop was considered the top contender (by me, at least), after Microsoft bought the mobile phone division of Nokia. But — for a variety of reasons — he soon fell behind two other internal candidates, Bates and Nadella. And further back still, Turner. Among the outsiders, Mulally — who has done a lot of deft lobbying for the job, after helping Ballmer in his efforts to restructure Microsoft — has always been in the forefront of the choice

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