Posts Tagged ‘street’

Twitter Is Showcasing the Top Tweets, Hashtags and Moments in a Single Place

January 26, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Twitter is finally adding a long requested feature: A better way to discover people, events and trends. The company is introducing Explore, a tab that the company says will be a home for the most popular and relevant content on the platform. In a blog post today, product designer Angela Lam said the addition will house Trends, Moments, Search and live video. "Over the past year, we've been exploring different ways to make it simpler for people to find and use Trends, Moments, and Search," Lam wrote. "During our research process, people told us that the new Explore tab helped them easily find news, what's trending, and what's popular right now." Explore—which will begin rolling out for iOS today and for Android within the next few weeks—is similar to what Twitter has been testing with some users a few months back. The news also comes just a few weeks after CEO Jack Dorsey used his own account to crowdsource suggestions for what users think Twitter could do to improve the experience

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The 4 Largest Holding Companies Are Now Involved in Federal ‘Bid Rigging’ Probe

December 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The federal government's investigation into allegations of antitrust practices at major ad agencies has expanded to include WPP, the world's largest holding company. WPP this morning released the following statement on its website: "WPP confirms that, similarly to Interpublic, Omnicom and Publicis, three of its subsidiaries have received subpoenas from the U.S. Department of Justice Antitrust Division concerning the Division's ongoing investigation of video production and post-production practices in the advertising industry. WPP and its subsidiaries are fully cooperating with the enquiries." That means all four of the largest holding companies by revenue have been subpoenaed by the federal government as its investigation into reports of "bid rigging" continues. Omnicom and Publicis confirmed on Friday that they had received subpoenas from the DOJ and that they planned to cooperate with the investigation. Interpublic Group made a similar statement the previous week, just days after news of the probe broke in The Wall Street Journal. A WPP spokesperson has not yet responded to requests for additional information, and the timing of the various subpoena requests is not currently clear.

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Twitter Is Cutting 9% of Its Global Workforce

October 27, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Twitter is planning to lay off 9 percent of its global workforce, as the ailing San Francisco tech giant struggles to please Wall Street despite beating earnings expectations. The company officially announced the cuts today in its third-quarter earnings, days after reports began to surface of the impending cuts. According to Twitter, the majority of the reductions will take place in its sales, partnerships and marketing divisions in order to "continue to fully fund our highest priorities," according to a letter to shareholders. However, the earnings also came with some good news. Total monthly active users grew for the second consecutive quarter to 317 million users, gaining 4 million over the past three months since its second-quarter results. Daily active users also increased, rising 7 percent year over year. Twitter's revenue totaled $616 million—an 8 percent increase year over year. Earnings per share totaled 13 cents, beating expectations of 9 cents per share and $606 million in total revenue. However, the company reported profit fell by $103 million. Advertising revenue grew 6 percent to $545 million, with mobile now accounting for 90 percent of total ad revenue. U.S. revenue grew just slightly, increasing 1 percent to $374 million year over year, outpaced by international ad revenue, which grew by 21 percent to $242 million

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Snapchat Is Ditching Auto Advance Stories in Favor of Playlists

October 7, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Snapchat is putting users' friends stories back where they came from. The company is reorganizing the layout of the app to put friends' content at the top, followed by the Discover and subscription sections. The updates, which were announced today, will also remove the Auto Advance feature that automatically plays the next set of snaps in a user's feed. The company is also launching a playlist option, which will let users select which friends' snaps they want to view. The changes could help users manage snap overload on the ever-growing platform. Select Android users will get the features first, with a full rollout for both Android and iOS expected soon. "Unfortunately, this change made it impossible to individually choose which Story to watch," Snapchat wrote in a blog post. "Sometimes we just want to see what our close friends or family are up to—not all of our friends—and Auto Advance prevented that." Snapchat is also launching a new ad format, post-roll ads, which will run after a user is done viewing a story. Snap ads also will continue to appear in a user's playlist just like they did during Auto Advance. The additional ads come on the heels of Snapchat launching its long awaited API, and just a day after news broke of parent company Snap Inc.'s possible plans to go public. According to a Wall Street Journal report, Snap Inc. is exploring an initial public offering as early as March that could value the company at $25 billion.

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Mode Media Shuts Down, Leaving Freelancers Unpaid

September 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just two years ago, Mode Media founder and chief executive Samir Arora described his Silicon Valley startup (formerly known as Glam Media) as "a pioneer of native advertising and content marketing," and boasted that after just 10 years it had grown to become "the 7th largest U.S. media company, reaching 50 percent of the U.S. digital population." Thursday evening, The Wall Street Journal reported the lifestyle content company once valued at $1 billion had shut down operations—leaving a network of content creator "partners" owed tens of thousands of dollars. Crissy Page, an Ohio-based writer who served as a contributing editor for Mode Media's parenting vertical, Tend, says the company owes her $17,000. Page says the shutdown came without any warning. "Work was ongoing right up until the last moment. I was receiving feedback about content for clients as recently as two days ago, which tells me that the account managers had no idea that the doors would be closing." Calls to Mode late Thursday went unanswered. Page says she reached one company contact at home, who gave her little hope of ever being paid. "She told me that all employee email accounts were immediately cut off when they sent people home." The company has pulled some of its content off the web—along with access to financial documents that Mode Media's content partners used to track what they were owed. "Personally, I did not see this coming," said writer Jaleesa Howard.

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Why You Likely Won’t See Too Much Political Advertising During the Olympics

July 29, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With the torch about to be lit at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, all eyes are on NBC. And with the TV-friendly time zone—Rio is only an hour ahead of the East Coast—NBC is looking to set records for viewership and advertising dollars. But even as NBC is looking at a bigger haul for ad revenue than it had in 2012—in March, the network surpassed $1 billion in national broadcast, cable and digital sales, four months earlier than it did four years ago—don't expect an onslaught of campaign ads from Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump. Unless, that is, you happen to live in one of the 10 to 14 swing states that will likely determine which party wins the White House this year. It would seem that the massive audience the Olympics provides—NBC drew more than 217 million viewers over the 17 days of the 2012 London Games, including an average of 31 million per night in prime time—would be an ideal chance for candidates to get their messages out. But with only so many political dollars to go around—Borrell Associates projected north of $11 billion in political advertising for the 2016 cycle—campaigns value efficiency over audience size, especially with all the ways available to reach voters, many of which didn't exist just four years ago. "[Voter groups] can be found and targeted in way more efficient ways," said Lenny Stern, co-founder and CEO of SS+K, the agency behind youth vote campaigns for Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012. Thanks largely to technology, marketers today have better ways to directly target specific audience segments rather than casting a wide, pricey net. The average cost for a 30-second spot for Rio is $100,000, Kantar Media estimates, which would be a slight increase over the previous two Summer Olympics. But for prime time, that price could be as high as $1 million, according to The Wall Street Journal. "Finding voters in Virginia, Ohio, Florida or Wisconsin in the most efficient way is much more important than some scaled, amazing platform that grabs a lot of eyeballs," Stern argued. The 2016 presidential election is anything but typical; you would have to be living under a rock, that was living under another rock, to not be familiar with the two candidates. After all, one is a former first lady, and the other is a reality TV star. "You're not introducing [voters] to new people," Stern said. "Here, you're really trying to target … people who are your supporters, or who are persuadable." Campaign money swings into battleground states Election ad dollars may not flow heavily on a national level—political advertising accounted for just 1 percent of all commercial inventory during the London Games—because for many campaigns, that spending occurs at the local station level. "You also bring into play on the Senate, House and local races," said Jon Swallen, CRO at Kantar Media. "There is a bigger pool of political advertising." Kantar found that in 2012, the spending was much higher in key battleground markets than in non-battleground states. Political ads only accounted for 1.5 percent of all local station inventory during the games. For example, political ads took up 38 percent of Reno, Nev., NBC affiliate KRNV's inventory.

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Harvey Nichols and Under Armour Take Top Film Lions at Cannes

June 25, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

CANNES, France—adam&eveDDB's "Shoplifters" spot for Harvey Nichols won the Film Grand Prix at the Cannes Lions festival here tonight, while Droga5's "Rule Yourself: Michael Phelps" for Under Armour took the same prize in Film Craft. Film Lions jury president Joe Alexander, chief creative officer at The Martin Agency, said his jury was looking primarily for new ideas—approaches that haven't been seen before. "Shoplifters" certainly qualifies, he said. "The Grand Prix goes to a new way to use security camera footage to sell a rewards card, of all things, for a retailer. It's just a phenomenal piece," Alexander said. "I think the best pieces now cross over. This one ran in cinema, it ran as an incredible viral piece. It's a very modern piece of film that lived in both worlds." "Most of us on the jury had seen this piece on a computer screen before," added Film juror Ana Balarin, executive creative director at Mother London. "When we got to see it on the big screen—this had never happened to me in a jury room before—once it was finished, the whole jury room spontaneously started applauding. That says a lot about it

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Michelle Obama: Marketing Can Make America Healthier

June 6, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

I don't think I ever could have imagined that, as first lady, I would appear in an episode of Billy on the Street to promote fruits and vegetables and would wind up slow dancing with Big Bird in a supermarket while Billy Eichner serenaded us with an Aerosmith song. Michelle Obama Headshot: Alex Fine But then again, six years ago, I don't think any of us could have imagined that Fenway Park would have a 5,000-square-foot farm on its rooftop to provide fresh produce for its fans; or that 50 million Americans would visit a government website called ChooseMyPlate to learn about healthy eating; or that sales of kale would jump 50 percent in just four years; or that 1.6 million kids would be in healthy daycares, eating more than 225 million healthy snacks and meals a year; or that more than 30 million kids would be eating healthier school breakfasts and lunches every day; or that the first unanimously chosen NBA MVP, Steph Curry , would choose fruits, vegetables and water as his primary product endorsements. In 2010, when I first launched Let's Move! —a nationwide effort to address our childhood obesity epidemic and raise a healthier generation—the challenge was so big and entrenched that this kind of transformation in how we live and eat seemed nearly impossible. Nonetheless, we were still determined to make a difference, so we engaged leaders from all sectors—educators, medical professionals, elected officials, parents and even kids themselves—to create public-private partnerships and science-based policy to improve access to healthy food. But we also knew we would need to get kids excited about eating that food and inform and empower parents to purchase and prepare that food for their families. And that meant meeting people where they are with fresh, interactive approaches and relevant, inspiring messages. We started by planting a vegetable garden on the White House lawn with local students to help kick off a national conversation around how we eat and where our food comes from. And since then, we've employed just about every medium imaginable to try to cut through the noise and engage kids and families directly—from Vine Q&As that brought about Turnip for What , to appearing on Disney's Doc McStuffins in cartoon form, to Mom Dancing with Jimmy Fallon (twice). We've also worked to use the power of advertising to our favor, which is no easy task when of the nearly $2 billion spent annually on advertising food to youth, less than 1 percent is spent on marketing fruits and vegetables (which, according to current nutrition guidelines, are supposed to fill half our plate at each meal). But we all know that advertising works, so we figured, why shouldn't fruits and vegetables get in on the action? That's the idea behind Partnership for a Healthier America's iconic FNV marketing campaign for millennials that utilizes celebrities like Steph Curry, Jessica Alba, Cam Newton and dozens of others in smart, funny ads for fruits and vegetables. In just the past year, FNV has drawn 1 billion media impressions, and 70 percent of people who saw the campaign said they ate more produce as a result. The same idea underlies a campaign by the Produce Marketing Association (PMA) called "eat brighter!" through which Sesame Workshop is allowing PMA to use Sesame Street characters, without a licensing fee, to promote fruits and vegetables in 29,000 grocery stores (think Elmo stickers on apples). Thanks to our favorite furry friends, PMA reported an increase in fruit and vegetable sales among campaign participants nationwide. Once we got people excited about healthy eating, we knew we would also have to improve how nutrition information is communicated to help folks actually buy and serve those healthy foods to their families. That's why we launched MyPlate —an icon that replaced the old food pyramid and provides clear guidance for how to put together a healthy meal. In addition, for the first time in 20 years, the FDA just finalized a new and improved Nutrition Facts label —with more realistic serving sizes, bigger font to showcase the calorie count and information about how much sugar was added during processing and how much comes from ingredients like fruit—that will soon be on nearly 800,000 food products nationwide

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Sundance Film Review: ‘Equity’

January 27, 2016  |  Variety  |  No Comments

If "The Wolf of Wall Street" took flak in some quarters for complicitly reveling in the glossy moral bankruptcy of its otherwise loaded brokers, the same accusation is unlikely to be leveled against "Equity."

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Jon Stewart Picks His Post-Daily Show Landing Spot: HBO

November 3, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After spending 16 years at Comedy Central as host of The Daily Show, Jon Stewart has found a new network to call home: HBO. The comedian signed a four-year deal with the premium cable network, but he won't be making his debut on any of HBO's TV channels. Instead, Stewart will initially create short-form digital content, for platforms including HBO Go and OTT subscription service, HBO Now. The deal also has a first-look option for film and TV projects. HBO said Stewart is working with cloud graphics company OTOY Inc.

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