Posts Tagged ‘street’

Why You Likely Won’t See Too Much Political Advertising During the Olympics

July 29, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With the torch about to be lit at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, all eyes are on NBC. And with the TV-friendly time zone—Rio is only an hour ahead of the East Coast—NBC is looking to set records for viewership and advertising dollars. But even as NBC is looking at a bigger haul for ad revenue than it had in 2012—in March, the network surpassed $1 billion in national broadcast, cable and digital sales, four months earlier than it did four years ago—don't expect an onslaught of campaign ads from Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump. Unless, that is, you happen to live in one of the 10 to 14 swing states that will likely determine which party wins the White House this year. It would seem that the massive audience the Olympics provides—NBC drew more than 217 million viewers over the 17 days of the 2012 London Games, including an average of 31 million per night in prime time—would be an ideal chance for candidates to get their messages out. But with only so many political dollars to go around—Borrell Associates projected north of $11 billion in political advertising for the 2016 cycle—campaigns value efficiency over audience size, especially with all the ways available to reach voters, many of which didn't exist just four years ago. "[Voter groups] can be found and targeted in way more efficient ways," said Lenny Stern, co-founder and CEO of SS+K, the agency behind youth vote campaigns for Barack Obama in 2008 and 2012. Thanks largely to technology, marketers today have better ways to directly target specific audience segments rather than casting a wide, pricey net. The average cost for a 30-second spot for Rio is $100,000, Kantar Media estimates, which would be a slight increase over the previous two Summer Olympics. But for prime time, that price could be as high as $1 million, according to The Wall Street Journal. "Finding voters in Virginia, Ohio, Florida or Wisconsin in the most efficient way is much more important than some scaled, amazing platform that grabs a lot of eyeballs," Stern argued. The 2016 presidential election is anything but typical; you would have to be living under a rock, that was living under another rock, to not be familiar with the two candidates. After all, one is a former first lady, and the other is a reality TV star. "You're not introducing [voters] to new people," Stern said. "Here, you're really trying to target … people who are your supporters, or who are persuadable." Campaign money swings into battleground states Election ad dollars may not flow heavily on a national level—political advertising accounted for just 1 percent of all commercial inventory during the London Games—because for many campaigns, that spending occurs at the local station level. "You also bring into play on the Senate, House and local races," said Jon Swallen, CRO at Kantar Media. "There is a bigger pool of political advertising." Kantar found that in 2012, the spending was much higher in key battleground markets than in non-battleground states. Political ads only accounted for 1.5 percent of all local station inventory during the games. For example, political ads took up 38 percent of Reno, Nev., NBC affiliate KRNV's inventory.

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Harvey Nichols and Under Armour Take Top Film Lions at Cannes

June 25, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

CANNES, France—adam&eveDDB's "Shoplifters" spot for Harvey Nichols won the Film Grand Prix at the Cannes Lions festival here tonight, while Droga5's "Rule Yourself: Michael Phelps" for Under Armour took the same prize in Film Craft. Film Lions jury president Joe Alexander, chief creative officer at The Martin Agency, said his jury was looking primarily for new ideas—approaches that haven't been seen before. "Shoplifters" certainly qualifies, he said. "The Grand Prix goes to a new way to use security camera footage to sell a rewards card, of all things, for a retailer. It's just a phenomenal piece," Alexander said. "I think the best pieces now cross over. This one ran in cinema, it ran as an incredible viral piece. It's a very modern piece of film that lived in both worlds." "Most of us on the jury had seen this piece on a computer screen before," added Film juror Ana Balarin, executive creative director at Mother London. "When we got to see it on the big screen—this had never happened to me in a jury room before—once it was finished, the whole jury room spontaneously started applauding. That says a lot about it

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Michelle Obama: Marketing Can Make America Healthier

June 6, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

I don't think I ever could have imagined that, as first lady, I would appear in an episode of Billy on the Street to promote fruits and vegetables and would wind up slow dancing with Big Bird in a supermarket while Billy Eichner serenaded us with an Aerosmith song. Michelle Obama Headshot: Alex Fine But then again, six years ago, I don't think any of us could have imagined that Fenway Park would have a 5,000-square-foot farm on its rooftop to provide fresh produce for its fans; or that 50 million Americans would visit a government website called ChooseMyPlate to learn about healthy eating; or that sales of kale would jump 50 percent in just four years; or that 1.6 million kids would be in healthy daycares, eating more than 225 million healthy snacks and meals a year; or that more than 30 million kids would be eating healthier school breakfasts and lunches every day; or that the first unanimously chosen NBA MVP, Steph Curry , would choose fruits, vegetables and water as his primary product endorsements. In 2010, when I first launched Let's Move! —a nationwide effort to address our childhood obesity epidemic and raise a healthier generation—the challenge was so big and entrenched that this kind of transformation in how we live and eat seemed nearly impossible. Nonetheless, we were still determined to make a difference, so we engaged leaders from all sectors—educators, medical professionals, elected officials, parents and even kids themselves—to create public-private partnerships and science-based policy to improve access to healthy food. But we also knew we would need to get kids excited about eating that food and inform and empower parents to purchase and prepare that food for their families. And that meant meeting people where they are with fresh, interactive approaches and relevant, inspiring messages. We started by planting a vegetable garden on the White House lawn with local students to help kick off a national conversation around how we eat and where our food comes from. And since then, we've employed just about every medium imaginable to try to cut through the noise and engage kids and families directly—from Vine Q&As that brought about Turnip for What , to appearing on Disney's Doc McStuffins in cartoon form, to Mom Dancing with Jimmy Fallon (twice). We've also worked to use the power of advertising to our favor, which is no easy task when of the nearly $2 billion spent annually on advertising food to youth, less than 1 percent is spent on marketing fruits and vegetables (which, according to current nutrition guidelines, are supposed to fill half our plate at each meal). But we all know that advertising works, so we figured, why shouldn't fruits and vegetables get in on the action? That's the idea behind Partnership for a Healthier America's iconic FNV marketing campaign for millennials that utilizes celebrities like Steph Curry, Jessica Alba, Cam Newton and dozens of others in smart, funny ads for fruits and vegetables. In just the past year, FNV has drawn 1 billion media impressions, and 70 percent of people who saw the campaign said they ate more produce as a result. The same idea underlies a campaign by the Produce Marketing Association (PMA) called "eat brighter!" through which Sesame Workshop is allowing PMA to use Sesame Street characters, without a licensing fee, to promote fruits and vegetables in 29,000 grocery stores (think Elmo stickers on apples). Thanks to our favorite furry friends, PMA reported an increase in fruit and vegetable sales among campaign participants nationwide. Once we got people excited about healthy eating, we knew we would also have to improve how nutrition information is communicated to help folks actually buy and serve those healthy foods to their families. That's why we launched MyPlate —an icon that replaced the old food pyramid and provides clear guidance for how to put together a healthy meal. In addition, for the first time in 20 years, the FDA just finalized a new and improved Nutrition Facts label —with more realistic serving sizes, bigger font to showcase the calorie count and information about how much sugar was added during processing and how much comes from ingredients like fruit—that will soon be on nearly 800,000 food products nationwide

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Sundance Film Review: ‘Equity’

January 27, 2016  |  Variety  |  No Comments

If "The Wolf of Wall Street" took flak in some quarters for complicitly reveling in the glossy moral bankruptcy of its otherwise loaded brokers, the same accusation is unlikely to be leveled against "Equity."

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Jon Stewart Picks His Post-Daily Show Landing Spot: HBO

November 3, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After spending 16 years at Comedy Central as host of The Daily Show, Jon Stewart has found a new network to call home: HBO. The comedian signed a four-year deal with the premium cable network, but he won't be making his debut on any of HBO's TV channels. Instead, Stewart will initially create short-form digital content, for platforms including HBO Go and OTT subscription service, HBO Now. The deal also has a first-look option for film and TV projects. HBO said Stewart is working with cloud graphics company OTOY Inc.

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The Weather Channel’s Future Just Got Harder to Predict After Digital Sell-Off

October 28, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The Weather Company has agreed to sell its digital and data assets—including weather.com, a suite of apps, its forecasting technology and the Weather Company brand—to IBM in a deal valued at more than $2 billion, according to The Wall Street Journal. Financial terms were not disclosed by either company. The deal does not include the TV channel, which will continue to be owned by Bain Capital, Blackstone and NBCUniversal and operate as a stand-alone business. The Weather Channel will now become a client of IBM, licensing weather-forecasting data it once owned. On the digital side, it shows the value of the products The Weather Company built, mostly through acquisition, and should help IBM make good on its $3 billion commitment to develop Internet of Things-type services. "The Weather Company's extremely high-volume data platform, coupled with IBM's global cloud and the advanced cognitive computing capabilities of Watson, will be unsurpassed, providing our clients significant competitive advantage as they link their business and sensor data with weather in real time," said John Kelly, svp for solutions portfolio and research at IBM. But for the TV channel, the future is much cloudier. "This can't be the end of what they're planning to do with the TV network," said John Swift, president and CEO of North American investment at Omnicom Media Group. "Do they plan to take the TV content and use it as a content engine and syndicate it to other people with weather?" For now, The Weather Channel plans to handle advertising the same way it has, but the digital sell-off has certainly raised more than a few questions.

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This New Measurement Tool Shows Millennials Are Watching as Much TV as Anyone

September 22, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As the new TV season kicks off with 22 new shows debuting over the next month, networks and advertisers will begin to make sense of which series are clicking with viewers and which ones will get axed. But in the current TV marketplace of fragmented viewership, networks have been complaining that Nielsen no longer provides an adequate measurement of who's really watching their shows. "We're not getting measured accurately and were losing a lot of people," said Alan Wurtzel, NBCUniversal's president of research and media development, during an industry meeting this morning. Wurtzel estimated that 15 percent to 35 percent of viewers who watch on other platforms are not getting counted. "And it's only growing," he added. VideoPulse, which was unveiled this morning, is a new TV multiplatform measurement tool from Symphony Advanced Media looking to finally crack that code. It's a cloud-based service that captures live media usage by individuals across OTT, VOD, Web, mobile, gaming devices, DVR and linear TV. Data comes from the 15,000 users who have already signed up to be tracked; Symphony hopes to have 50,000 within the next year. The data VideoPulse has already gathered goes against the idea that millennials aren't watching TV—they just aren't watching the way previous generations did. According to traditional TV measurement from Nielsen, millennial viewing has dropped 30 percent over the past five years. But VideoPulse found that 25 percent of viewing among millennials is on DVRs and over-the-top services and happens outside the Live+7 window, not measured by Nielsen. "There has been a significant void in understanding how consumers are using nontraditional media platforms, but innovation has finally arrived in the media-measurement space," said Charles Buchwalter, president and CEO of Symphony Advanced Media. Buchwalter says the product will "track the cross-media, cross-platform behavior of consumers in the fastest growing mode of TV and video viewing, allowing the market to extend beyond the current industry-accepted norm of Live viewing plus seven days ratings." The product—which is available immediately for advertisers, agencies and media companies—is already undergoing beta testing by NBC, Viacom, Warner Bros. Media Research and A+E Networks. "Our industry has been disadvantaged by legacy-measurement approaches that have failed to evolve with consumers' increasing use of media platforms," said Liz Huszarik, evp, Warner Bros. Media Research & Insights. "We are hopeful that by working with Symphony Advanced Media's VideoPulse that we can capture an accurate picture of consumers' total TV/video usage across platforms and devices with a transparency that's been missing from other vendors." VideoPulse also includes data from streaming services—most notably Netflix—which so far hasn't been divulged

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Discovery Leverages Global Reach in Multi-Network Upfront

March 31, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It's not uncommon to hear hyperbolic talk at upfront presentations, but when Discovery Channel president Rich Ross talked about reaching for the moon at the network's presentation in New York Tuesday, he meant it—among the shows Discovery Channel announced is Lunar XPRIZE, tracking a competition among teams working to land a craft on the moon (preferably, Ross said, live, and in prime time). The Discovery Channel also announced Racing Extinction, a documentary from the producers of the Academy Award-winning The Cove that will "expose the hidden world of endangered species and race to protect them against mass extinction." Discovery Communications chief executive David Zaslav said with Discovery networks in 230 countries, an effort like Racing Extinction can become a show with truly global scale. "It's something only Discovery can do," Zaslav said. "We're reaching more people in more countries than any other media company." Zaslav said his networks had focused their spending on programs with international appeal, as Discovery worked to expand its global footprint. "Our international pillar gives us a real hedge as you look at the slowing of the U.S. business," said Zaslav. Highlights from the Discovery networks:

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Netflix, Marvel Pick ‘Luke Cage’ Showrunner, Cheo Hodari Coker

March 31, 2015  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Netflix and Marvel Television announced that Cheo Hodari Coker (“Ray Donovan,” “Southland”) will serve as exec producer and showrunner of “Luke Cage,” the street-hero series slated to premiere next year. It was previously announced that Mike Colter (“The Good Wife,” “American Horror Story: Coven”) will play Luke Cage in the series. Coker is writing the first two... Read more

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Web TV Players Turn Up the Heat on Cable Providers

March 18, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just over two months ago, Dish unveiled Sling TV at the Consumer Electronics Show. It was a big deal: the service offers premium cable channels like AMC, Adult Swim and the 400 lb. gorilla of cable networks, ESPN, and at $30 a month, live. Its slogan? "Take back TV." Monday, news that Apple is planning a similar creation leaked to The Wall Street Journal—indeed, the service is set to include every broadcaster except NBC (and thus none of NBC's sister networks, either) and several cable channels, and to run between $30 and $40 a month. A few days earlier, Sony announced that its own TV service, revealed at last year's CES, was literally ready for primetime—it, too, will have broadcast networks (only ABC was still holding out) and several cable players involved, including Viacom, which owns all-important Nickelodeon. Sony's similar Vue service went live today

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