Posts Tagged ‘street-journal’

All Things Walt: Mossberg’s Top Dozen Picks Over 20 Years of Reviewing Tech (Video)

December 23, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Here’s the tech reviewer Walt Mossberg talking on CNBC about his top picks for the last two decades he has written about the arena. Mossberg names Apple products as the biggest influencer over this time, although in his last column for The Wall Street Journal after more than 20 years of reviewing, he also mentions Microsoft’s Windows 95, Google Search and Twitter. Although he is leaving the WSJ on December 31 — and this site too, since it is owned by News Corp. — there is much more to come at the start of 2014. You can read a bit about that here in this Mashable exit interview , where Mossberg talks about his work over the last 20 years and more. Here’s the best part, his advice for young journalists just starting out, which never really changes: “I would tell them quality over quantity, which is one of the biggest sins on the Web, particularly today.

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AllThingsD Week in Review: WhatsApp vs. Bullshit Metrics and Apple’s Tearjerker Ad

December 23, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Creative Commons image via toolmantim In case you missed anything, here’s a quick roundup of some of the news that powered AllThingsD this week: The chest-beating of “bullshit metrics” over the past few weeks by its mobile messaging competitors seems to have frazzled the folks at WhatsApp, which this week very pointedly announced that it had 400 million active users. Facebook has been working on its video ad product for more than a year, and now it’s almost here: Here’s what one of the autoplaying ads will look like . Tristan Walker had a lot of startup ideas as entrepreneur-in-residence at Andreessen Horowitz, but the one he decided to pursue was his most authentic: Walker & Company Brands , a next-generation Procter & Gamble making health and beauty simple for people of color. Our own Walt Mossberg has been reviewing consumer technology products for the Wall Street Journal and AllThingsD for the past 22 years. Now, as team ATD prepares for a new adventure next year , Walt looked back at the top 12 most influential products he reviewed in the past two decades. In a bid to sell even more of its Kindle Fire HDX tablets, Amazon is trying something new: Starting this week, it began letting buyers pay off the tablets on an installment plan . It’s sweeter than a candy cane doused in eggnog, but Apple’s new Christmasy ad for the iPhone and Apple TV went viral this week. We’re in the midst of yet another videogame console war, but Sony and Microsoft have very different ideas of what a console should be. Bonnie Cha writes that, at least for gamers, the PlayStation 4 “makes the right play.” A Chinese ban on Chinese yuan deposits in a bitcoin exchange there sent the price of the virtual currency tumbling. But it’s not a death knell to the bitcoin ecosystem because if China wanted to ban bitcoin, it would ban bitcoin . Foursquare, the iconic social location service, has raised $35 million in a Series D round . Calxeda, the Austin-based startup that sought to spearhead server chips based on the ARM architecture found in mobile devices, has shut down . “They just ran out of runway,” one source said. To stay on top of the latest, please follow AllThingsD ’s writers on Twitter and Facebook , and subscribe to our daily email newsletter .

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Twitter Steps Up Test of Local Tweet Discovery Feature

December 14, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

As AllThingsD first reported in April , Twitter is continuing to test a feature that surfaces nearby tweets based on a user’s location. Spotted by The Wall Street Journal in the wild, the feature looks to be a separate swipe-able timeline — and opt-in only, in its current state.

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Can Cable Consolidation Get Past the Regulators?

November 22, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Comcast is looking seriously at acquiring Time Warner Cable, multiple reports said earlier today, prompting rapid fluctuations in TWC's stock price, which spiked 9 percent to $132.16 a share this afternoon (the stock was trading below $120 a share as recently as Wednesday). Part of the stock movement has to do with TWC's attractiveness to more than one suitor: backed by Liberty Media, Charter is also looking at acquiring the cable operator. The Wall Street Journal reported yesterday that Charter is close to securing funding for a bid. There's a reason Time Warner looks like the prettiest girl at the dance: it has a full 14.6 million subscribers and it's in hot water with its shareholders as of recently, principally because it lost some 306,000 of those subscribers during its lengthy beef with CBS earlier this year. That cost the company some $122 million, but TWC's revenue is still $2.6 billion —not exactly a distressed asset . As the cable market matures and threatens to shrink , consolidation has become a serious proposition for companies looking to shed money-sucking bureaucracies and pare down infrastructures across as many subscribers as possible. Of course, part of the reason for the existing inefficiencies is that habit larger cable companies have of eating smaller ones, but those little cable companies are like Lay's potato chips : you can't eat just one. (Most recently, TWC gobbled up Dukenet for a $600 million cash deal ) It remains to be seen whether Washington will be excited to see another merger between giant service providers in an industry already criticized for creating regional monopolies. The last time Comcast wanted to do something like this—when it merged with media giant NBCUniversal—it attracted further criticism when, after the deal was approved, then-commissioner Meredith Baker jumped ship to a consultancy job at the newly-formed mega-corporation. If Comcast wants to buy TWC, it's a safe bet that it will have a tougher row to hoe than Charter.

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Will Regulators Put the Kibosh on Cable Consolidation?

November 22, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Comcast is looking seriously at acquiring Time Warner Cable, multiple reports said earlier today, prompting rapid fluctuations in TWC's stock price, which spiked 9 percent to $132.16 a share this afternoon (the stock was trading below $120 a share as recently as Wednesday). Part of the stock movement has to do with TWC's attractiveness to more than one suitor: backed by Liberty Media, Charter is also looking at acquiring the cable operator. The Wall Street Journal reported yesterday that Charter is close to securing funding for a bid. There's a reason Time Warner looks like the prettiest girl at the dance: it has a 11.6 million subscribers and is in hot water with its shareholders, largely because it lost some 306,000 of those paying customers during its month-long beef with CBS . That cost the company some $122 million , but TWC's revenue is still $2.6 billion —not exactly a distressed asset . As the cable market matures and threatens to shrink , consolidation has become a serious proposition for companies looking to shed money-sucking bureaucracies and pare down infrastructures across as many subscribers as possible. Of course, part of the reason for the existing inefficiencies is that habit larger cable companies have of eating smaller ones, but those little cable companies are like Lay's potato chips : you can't eat just one. (Most recently, TWC gobbled up DukeNet in

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More iPhone 5c Supply Chain Rumors

October 18, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Has Apple reduced orders for its new iPhone 5c? A growing chorus of reports suggests that it has. Earlier this week, The Wall Street Journal reported that Apple has told manufacturing partners Pegatron and Hon Hai to ramp down production of the device. Reuters echoed that report later the same day, and now NPD DisplaySearch is making similar claims . In a report published Friday, the research outfit said recent channel checks suggest that Apple has dialed back iPhone 5c production by 35 percent, while increasing iPhone 5s production by 75 percent. NPD attributes the 5c production cuts to demand weakened by the device’s higher-than-expected price. “Rumors about iPhone 5c being ‘cheap’ were circulating as early as Q3 2012,” NPD analysts Tina Teng and Shawn Lee theorize. “The fact that the iPhone 5c is nearly identical to the iPhone 5 — and is not cheap — disappointed some consumers.” Perhaps. That’s certainly an easy explanation for such production cuts following a nine-million-new-iPhones-sold opening weekend . But easy explanations aren’t always accurate, and as similarly pessimistic reports about iPhone 5 demand last year proved, supply chain production volume rumors sometimes aren’t the best information on which to gauge iPhone sales. Things can go from “FLASH: Apple has cut orders for iPhone components due to weaker-than-expected demand!” to “My bad! Apple actually sold 47.8 million iPhones this quarter” pretty quickly. As Apple CEO Tim Cook said in January , “I’d recommend questioning the accuracy of any kind of rumor about build plans. I’d also stress that even if a particular data point were to be factual it would be impossible to interpret what it really means to our business. Our supply chain is very complex and we have multiple sources for our components

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AllThingsD in The Media: Microsoft’s Next CEO (Maybe) and a New Video Chat App

October 6, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Another busy week of tech news — and when was the last time it wasn’t a busy week? — meant AllThingsD ‘s personnel was equally busy in the media this week. Early in the week, on Sept. 30, Kara Swisher was on CNBC to talk about the still-unfolding story about the possibility that Alan Mullaly, the current CEO of automaker Ford may be in line to replace Steve Ballmer as the next CEO of software giant Microsoft. Swisher was first to report the news that Mullaly is being considered for the job on Sept. 26. Also Walt Mossberg was on The Wall Street Journal’s Digits to talk about the new video chat app Spin. [ See post to watch video ]

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Cheaper Advice: Angie’s List Cuts Prices

October 2, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Consumer-review site Angie’s List Inc. has slashed membership prices by roughly 75 percent in several key markets, in a bid to attract new members. Chief Executive William Oesterle told The Wall Street Journal that new members in New York, Washington D.C., Chicago, San Francisco and Indianapolis, among other markets, are now paying around $10 for an annual membership, down from around $40. Read the rest of this post on the original site »

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How Can You Miss Us if We Won’t Go Away?

September 20, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

First things first: We’re keeping the Steelcase hot-seat red chairs. Forever. In fact, we own quite a few now. And we’ll still be scooping and reviewing all things digital right here, at this Web address, for a few more months. So, while we appreciate the teary farewells we’ve been receiving today across the Web, they’re premature — not by just months, but by many, many years. What are we blathering about, you ask? Well, earlier today, the owner of this site — the Dow Jones unit of News Corp — issued a statement stating that, by mutual agreement, the AllThingsD team and the parent company had decided to part ways when our current contract is up on Dec. 31. The separation impacts both this website and our suite of conferences, including the most famous, the D conference, which we built together from scratch — with a whole lot of help from our stellar staff — 11 years ago. That statement is true. But you, dear reader, can’t get rid of us quite that easily.

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Jawbone Raises More Than $100 Million to Meet Demand for Wearable Tech

September 12, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Jawbone, the Bay Area-based electronics company that makes colorful Bluetooth speakers and the activity-tracking Up wristband, has raised more than $100 million through debt financing and new equity. Jawbone UP The funding round was first reported by Fortune earlier this morning. AllThingsD has independently confirmed the funding. The company has said it needs cash in the short term to meet demand for its products, as it has “millions of back-orders to fill,” according to the Fortune report. Its long-term strategy, I’m told, includes the hiring of more data engineers to work on its wearable products. Jawbone raised over $90 million in debt financing and asset-backed loans from Silver Lake Partners, Fortress Investment Group, J.P. Morgan and Wells Fargo. Previous investors Andreessen Horowitz, Sequoia Capital and Kleiner Perkins also contributed to a new round of equity said to be at $20 million. In recent months, Jawbone, which is led by founder and CEO Hosain Rahman, has made at least a few strategic acquisitions in addition to expanding its product line and making key hires. In February, Jawbone bought two mobile-focused health and lifestyle companies, Visere and Massive Health , for an undisclosed amount. In April, it spent more than $100 million to acquire BodyMedia , a veteran Pittsburgh-based health-tracking company, for both its talent and its patents. Since then, it has also hired data scientist Monica Rogati as a “VP of Data” and has been looking to hire more data-focused scientists and engineers. Jawbone’s $130 Up wristband is part of a growing category of devices that are worn on the wrist and other parts of the body to track wearers’ activity levels throughout the day and sync the data to a mobile device. Competitors include Fitbit’s products and the Nike+ FuelBand — and competition may be creeping up from within the mobile phone itself, as sensors inside smartphones get better and more plentiful

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