Posts Tagged ‘street-journal’

Snapchat Is Ditching Auto Advance Stories in Favor of Playlists

October 7, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Snapchat is putting users' friends stories back where they came from. The company is reorganizing the layout of the app to put friends' content at the top, followed by the Discover and subscription sections. The updates, which were announced today, will also remove the Auto Advance feature that automatically plays the next set of snaps in a user's feed. The company is also launching a playlist option, which will let users select which friends' snaps they want to view. The changes could help users manage snap overload on the ever-growing platform. Select Android users will get the features first, with a full rollout for both Android and iOS expected soon. "Unfortunately, this change made it impossible to individually choose which Story to watch," Snapchat wrote in a blog post. "Sometimes we just want to see what our close friends or family are up to—not all of our friends—and Auto Advance prevented that." Snapchat is also launching a new ad format, post-roll ads, which will run after a user is done viewing a story. Snap ads also will continue to appear in a user's playlist just like they did during Auto Advance. The additional ads come on the heels of Snapchat launching its long awaited API, and just a day after news broke of parent company Snap Inc.'s possible plans to go public. According to a Wall Street Journal report, Snap Inc. is exploring an initial public offering as early as March that could value the company at $25 billion.

Read More

Mode Media Shuts Down, Leaving Freelancers Unpaid

September 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just two years ago, Mode Media founder and chief executive Samir Arora described his Silicon Valley startup (formerly known as Glam Media) as "a pioneer of native advertising and content marketing," and boasted that after just 10 years it had grown to become "the 7th largest U.S. media company, reaching 50 percent of the U.S. digital population." Thursday evening, The Wall Street Journal reported the lifestyle content company once valued at $1 billion had shut down operations—leaving a network of content creator "partners" owed tens of thousands of dollars. Crissy Page, an Ohio-based writer who served as a contributing editor for Mode Media's parenting vertical, Tend, says the company owes her $17,000. Page says the shutdown came without any warning. "Work was ongoing right up until the last moment. I was receiving feedback about content for clients as recently as two days ago, which tells me that the account managers had no idea that the doors would be closing." Calls to Mode late Thursday went unanswered. Page says she reached one company contact at home, who gave her little hope of ever being paid. "She told me that all employee email accounts were immediately cut off when they sent people home." The company has pulled some of its content off the web—along with access to financial documents that Mode Media's content partners used to track what they were owed. "Personally, I did not see this coming," said writer Jaleesa Howard.

Read More

CNBC To Opt Out of Nielsen Ratings for Daytime Programming – Report

January 6, 2015  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Business-news network CNBC is planning to stop using Nielsen ratings as the basis for the sale of advertising on its daytime schedule to advertisers, The Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday morning, in a maneuver that calls into question one of the bedrock elements of the TV business at a time when big chunks of audience... Read more

Read More

Jenny Craig Sells Horse Ranch to Bill Gates

October 9, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

BUYER: Bill and Melinda Gates SELLER: Jenny Craig LOCATION: Rancho Santa Fe, CA PRICE: $18,000,000 SIZE: 228 acres YOUR MAMA’S NOTES: The celebrity real estate snitches at The Wall Street Journal were the first to tattle that octogenarian diet queen Jenny Craig shed Rancho Paseana Farm, her 228-acre horse ranch in ritzy Rancho Santa Fe... Read more

Read More

French Resistance Crumbles in Netflix Debut

September 15, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Netflix broke through some heavy French telecom resistance today as it debuted its video-on-demand service in six more European countries. One of France’s major telecom companies, Bouygues, announced that it would integrate Netflix in its TV set-top boxes starting in November, according to the Nasdaq news. Bouyges' move is just the news Netflix wants to hear because its video-on-demand service counts on reliable broadband pipelines, and the set-top boxes are how French TV viewers access their programming. France’s largest telecom company, Orange SA, has also signaled it would consider offering Netflix if the service is successful, according to the Nasdaq report. This last-minute breakthrough comes amid reports last week that European countries didn’t have the bandwidth to handle Netflix, an assertion flatly denied by a company spokesperson. Just to be safe, Netflix is increasing its server capacity in Paris. The pieces appear to be coming together from a technical standpoint, but when it comes to content, there is ample French pushback

Read More

NFL Has a Lot of Leverage in Negotiating TV Deals

September 5, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When the NFL negotiated with TV networks on the rights to broadcast eight "Thursday Night Football" games this season, the contract stipulated that term was only for one year, that games would air simultaneously on the league's own NFL Network and that the winning bidder would cover all production costs on all sixteen "Thursday Night Football" broadcasts (including two Saturday games). “Media companies lined up to bid anyway,” The Wall Street Journal reported. CBS ultimately prevailed, agreeing to pay $300 million for the broadcast rights, with the first game in the new lineup premiering next week (tonight's season opener is being broadcast by NBC as part of an earlier agreement). The negotiation and what CBS paid illustrate the extreme leverage the NFL wields with networks. NBC, CBS and ESPN together have contracts that make up between $5 and $5 billion per year to broadcast NFL games through the 2021-22 season. "It's almost like the networks are afraid to say no to the NFL," one senior executive told The Wall Street Journal. Anyone in a traditional TV exec’s shoes would be. While networks face threats like the rise of streaming video services, the NFL offers a bankable product that consumers won't just wait to catch on Netflix. According to securities firm Jefferies Group, 97 percent of all sports are watched live. Add to that the NFL's short season and 17.4 million average regular season game viewers in the 18-49 demo and each game becomes a hot ticket. At the same time, the NFL is amping up its digital push by offering new or expanded online programs. This includes NFL Now, a new online video service offering NFL-made films, shows, documentaries and new footage from teams for $1.99 per month. The NFL also is strengthening a one-year agreement with Twitter to tweet highlights from in-progress games and increasing the number of games streamed to smart phones as part of a four-year, $1 billion agreement with Verizon. As The Wall Street Journal notes, both of these deals include rights denied of the NFL's television broadcast partners. What's more, some television executives fear that NFL Now will stream games directly to fans. Brian Rolapp, evp of media for the NFL, doesn't rule out such a possibility. "If the world shifts dramatically as people think, it'll be nice to have an asset like NFL Now just like it's nice to have NFL Network," he told the Journal, adding that "selling game-streaming rights to an online company is a matter of 'when, not if.'" DirecTV also finds itself backed against a wall in negotiations with the NFL.

Read More

WWE Will Cut 7% of Its Workforce

August 1, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

World Wrestling Entertainment will slash 7 percent of its workforce after reporting operating at a loss in the second quarter due to the costs of ramping up its online-subscription service. WWE reported a net loss of $14.5 million, compared to a net profit of $5.2 million last year. "The staff cuts, and other cost-cutting moves, would help boost operating income before depreciation and amortization by $30 million in 2015," WWE said, adding that the cuts would effect around 50-60 staffers across all business units. WWE launched their WWE Network in February, making WWE the first entertainment company with a cable presence to offer a stand-alone online subscription service . Yesterday, WWE reported 33,000 WWE Network subscribers since April for a total of 700,000 subscribers—still 300,000 short of its year-end goal of one million. According to The Wall Street Journal , the company "noted that 1.3 million to 1.4 million subscribers would put it past a break-even point offsetting difficulties in pay-per-view." To increase interest in the service, WWE will add new payment options (the service was originally only available as a six-month subscription), including a commitment-free $19.99 monthly plan. "For us the payment options are one way to continue learning, to see how people approach it," George Barrios, WWE's chief strategy and financial officer, told The Wall Street Journal. "The fact that we've gone from 0 to 700,000 paying subscribers, I feel really proud."

Read More

ABC Taps New Programming Sales Chief

July 11, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

ABC has hired Mike Dean as its new vp, programmatic and data-driven sales, The Wall Street Journal reports . Dean joins the Disney-owned network from ad tech firm Videology, where he was vp, media platform sales and solutions. Before Videology, Dean served as director, publisher services at Vibrant Media and business development manager - Bing for Microsoft. "Mike has a wealth of experience in digital and new media sales," said Pooja Midha, senior vice president of digital ad sales, in a statement. "We are very happy that he will lead the ABC sales team as we continue to lead the way in finding innovative solutions for all of our clients." The move comes following ABC's announcment at its upfront in May that it will be teaming up with video ad firm FreeWheel in launching a programmatic video effort. That move was seen largely as a reaction to Comcast's purchase of FreeWheel, which, according to The Wall Street Journal, caused media executives to voice "concerns privately that Comcast...is gaining too much clout in the growing digital TV business."

Read More

Networks Are Writing Discounted C7 Deals, But Not Everyone’s Biting

June 2, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Even with Kevin Reilly out at the News Corp broadcaster and ratings declines from an aging American Idol, Fox has managed to score a serious deal: GroupM, arguably the biggest media agency network, is buying C7 guarantees. GroupM didn't respond immediately to requests for comment, but one of the networks is said to be dangling a 3 percent pricing discount in front of agencies that will agree to C7 guarantees. It hasn't even been that long since the networks started selling C3—the shift to C7 is something buyers have long resisted, given the length of time it takes to process the data and the need for immediate returns on ads such as movie trailers. With C7 guarantees, you may see that your ad was delivered, but if your ad was delivered on unskippable VOD on Tuesday and your movie opened on Friday, it's probably not a great feeling to shell out cash for that delivery. And GroupM does represent Paramount Pictures among many, many other big-name clients including Unilever and AT&T.

Read More

Networks Will Write Discounted C7 Deals, but Not Everyone’s Biting

June 2, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Even with Kevin Reilly out at the News Corp broadcaster and ratings declines from an aging American Idol, Fox has managed to score a serious deal: GroupM, arguably the biggest media agency network, is buying C7 guarantees. GroupM didn't respond immediately to requests for comment, but one of the networks is said to be dangling a 3 percent pricing discount in front of agencies that will agree to C7 guarantees. It hasn't even been that long since the networks started selling C3—the shift to C7 is something buyers have long resisted, given the length of time it takes to process the data and the need for immediate returns on ads such as movie trailers. With C7 guarantees, you may see that your ad was delivered, but if your ad was delivered on unskippable VOD on Tuesday and your movie opened on Friday, it's probably not a great feeling to shell out cash for that delivery. And GroupM does represent Paramount Pictures among many other big-name clients including Unilever and AT&T. It's a gamble (and probably not a gamble the media agency is taking on all of its clients), but it's one head buyer Rino Scanzoni has said he's comfortable with as recently as three weeks ago. "It all comes down to economics," Scanzoni told the Wall Street Journal . "Clients are obviously getting that audience when people play back their programs post-three days; if they’re not fast-forwarding the commercials, that exposure exists. Ultimately I do see the business going onto a C7 metric because as we try to drive the business to a cross-platform metric, you probably need a longer time frame than the C3 window to optimize that. We will eventually be going there. It’s a matter of working out the economics initially to make the transition one that’s acceptable to both sides." So let the message go forth: The economics are acceptable at the moment

Read More