Posts Tagged ‘social’

A Tale of Two Cities? A Q&A With Gavin Newsom on San Francisco’s History of “Animus” With Tech.

December 18, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

On the occasion of San Francisco finally getting its first major public Wi-Fi installation this week — nearly a decade after such an initiative had been proposed and awarded to Google and Earthlink — it seemed timely to call on Gavin Newsom. Newsom is the current lieutenant governor of California and former San Francisco mayor who had led the initial project. While still hurting over some political setbacks back then on the issue and wanting a little credit for his early efforts, he had some interesting thoughts on the history of intersections between San Francisco technology initiatives and public backlash against the tech industry. It’s a relevant and ongoing conversation as tensions continue in the city, which both embraces its tech hegemony and is also a little uncomfortable with the social and economic debates it brings. Representatives from local tech companies met behind closed doors yesterday with current Mayor Ed Lee for a conversation about “how the tech sector and the city can keep working together to continue San Francisco’s economic success for the benefit of everyone,” according to organizer Ron Conway, who said that specific areas of discussion included education, jobs and affordable housing.

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2013 Was a Huge Year for Android Gaming

December 17, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

For years, Apple has been the presumptive leader in mobile gaming, and it’s still in pole position. But if global trends in 2013 were any indication, its nearest rival, Google Play, is putting the heat on. That’s one of the conclusions of a “2013 Year in Review” report released today by app-analytics platform Distimo . Although the vast majority of app revenue in the West is still coming from gamers on iPhones and iPads, Google Play as a source of revenue leads in South Korea and Japan, two of the three fastest-growing markets worldwide. (The third is China, where Google Play is drowned out by countless competing Android app stores that Distimo does not track). Just how much are those Asian countries growing? Try a 759 percent year-over-year increase in revenue, in South Korea’s case: Apple’s App Store is still doing just fine, thank you very much: The report estimates that daily revenue for the Top 200 iOS apps grew from $15 million in November 2012 to $18 million in November 2013. But Google is growing its share of the pie at a far faster clip, with the Top 200 apps grossing $12 million per day, up from only $3.5 million the year before. That’s huge. Distimo’s top-grossing charts for the year further solidify the case that this growth is coming from Asia

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Facebook to Sell Video Ads

December 17, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Facebook Inc. will begin selling video advertisements later this week, according to people familiar with the matter. The ads, which will play automatically in users’ news feeds may help Facebook capture a share of the $66.4 billion advertisers are expected to spend on U.S. television this year. Read the rest of this post on the original site »

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Benchmark’s Mitch Lasky on App Discovery, Distribution, and the Power of Chat Networks

December 16, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Benchmark Capital partner Mitch Lasky is a games guy. He’s been in the business for decades — long before he went into venture capital — and when it comes to selling games, he has seen what works and what doesn’t. So it seems strange that Lasky is so knowledgeable on apps like Line, WeChat and KakaoTalk — some of the biggest messaging applications in countries outside the U.S. But it’s not so odd, considering that mobile games companies are increasingly moving toward these chat apps to help people find and download their games. I sat down with Lasky last week to chat about the gaming industry, and social games in particular, and what he had to say about chat networks is something every gaming company should take note of. Oh, and while he wouldn’t speak much about it, pay attention to the part in here about Snapchat, the buzzy messaging app he happens to advise and sit on the board of. AllThingsD: So talk to me about something I know a little bit about, but I hear is going to be big: Games distribution through chat apps. WeChat, Line and KakaoTalk are all offering mobile games for sale or download inside their main chatting apps. Why is this a big thing, and why are American companies interested in it? Mitch Lasky : It’s amazing –if you look at the Korean mobile app stores, 10 out of their Top 10 mobile games are being distributed through KakaoTalk. It’s totally working. It’s an unbelievably great distribution channel. So, why is that better than, say, Apple’s App Store? I want to know how it works so well. Well, if I told you, then I’d have to kill you. No, seriously though. I think you need to decouple the concept of distribution and discovery. Distribution has become completely commoditized.

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Twitter Tries to Get Your Attention

December 13, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Twitter’s great, but if you’re a regular human, you can’t spend all of your time looking at it.* So what if someone plops out something interesting, and you miss it? Twitter has a plan for that. Former Foursquare product head Alex Rainert happened to catch a glimpse of it yesterday, when Twitter sent a push notification to his iPhone, telling him that two of his pals were talking about … “Grey’s Anatomy.” As Rainert notes, he’s not particularly interested in knowing about that. But Twitter is very interested in TV, so you can see why it would experiment with different ways of telling users what people are saying about TV on Twitter. (Here’s an earlier experiment from this summer .) And more broadly, as John Herrman pointed out a while back , you can imagine Twitter using push notifications to tell people about all sorts of stuff that’s happening on Twitter. Note that Twitter has recently rolled out two features/experiments designed to surface interesting stuff for you — Event Parrot for breaking news , and Magic Recs for people your friends are paying attention to — and it has already converted Magic Recs into a push notification system. If you opt in, Twitter will start suggesting Twitter users for you to follow, based on the fact that your Twitter pals have started following them, too. (The most recent heads-up I received was about Danah Boyd ’s new “think/do tank” called  Data & Society Research Institute .) In Rainert’s case, he didn’t ask Twitter to tell him that his pals were talking about TV. And you can see the downside of this thing if Twitter pushes too many of these to people who don’t want them. But I think Twitter thinks the upside is pretty significant. Highlighting cool stuff is nice for power users, and may keep them more engaged. And it could be crucial for new users, which Twitter really needs : Hey, we know this seems like a lot of people jabbering about weird stuff — WTF is an RT, right? — but look over here! You might want to know about this . So I have a hunch we’ll see more of this. Even if we don’t ask for it. * I do know some people who look at Twitter every minute they are awake, but they are most definitely not regular humans, even though they are nice people in their own special way.

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QOTD: My Favorite Waste of Time

December 13, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

All writers should have as many forms of unproductive distraction as possible. For me it used to be that I would clean drawers or rearrange my closets or start cooking lunch. I had many, many ways of pretending to be working, but not really working. So Twitter is quite marvelous at that. It is a wonderful, wonderful way of just procrastinating … – Author Susan Orlean, extolling a side benefit of Twitter, on the All Write Already! podcast

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QOTD: My Favorite Waste of Time

December 13, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

All writers should have as many forms of unproductive distraction as possible. For me it used to be that I would clean drawers or rearrange my closets or start cooking lunch. I had many, many ways of pretending to be working, but not really working. So Twitter is quite marvelous at that. It is a wonderful, wonderful way of just procrastinating … – Author Susan Orlean, extolling a side benefit of Twitter, on the All Write Already! podcast

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Twitter Flip Flops on Safety Feature Changes

December 13, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Twitter rolled out a set of tweaks to its “blocking” feature on Friday, only to reverse its decision hours later and revert back to the original settings after a torrent of user outrage and petitions from activist groups. Concerns were primarily around user safety and harassment issues that could have occurred as a result of the changes.

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Video Is the Future of Social

December 11, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

This past spring, at the YouTube Upfronts in New York City, Google vice president Robert Kyncl stood in front of a packed audience of brand marketers and made a seemingly simple, but revelatory, declaration: “ TV is one-way. YouTube talks back .” What is happening on YouTube and on places like Vine (which is doubling monthly average users month over month) and Instagram, is something that many of us who study the social Web have known for some time: Video is the future of social. Why video? Why not text or photos — permanent or ephemeral? Is it simply the combination of sight, sound and motion? The clues to the answer are all around us. This past week, news of the tragic death of actor Paul Walker sparked tens of thousands of people to reach out on social media to express pain and sadness, and send prayers to his family and friends. For a 48-hour period, Twitter was trending with the news, and Facebook feeds were crowded with thoughts and condolences. As activity on Facebook and Twitter waned, the heartfelt vigils have continued to grow on YouTube, where more than 6,000 tribute videos had been uploaded within 100 hours of the tragedy. These beautiful videos, along with news videos of the tragedy found on YouTube, have touched more than 170 million people. Ultimately, the tribute videos will live forever, and will be added to the vast collection of images from the star’s “Fast & Furious” movie franchise, which an audience of more than six million fans enjoy monthly on the platform. This social media outpouring on YouTube highlights the fact that the shelf life of a Tweet or a Facebook post is now vanishingly small, evidenced by the fact that a Facebook post gets half its reach within 30 minutes of being published. By comparison, more than half of YouTube videos’ lifetime views come after three weeks of uploading. Take a look at any popular video from any year, and you’ll find recent comments that continue the conversation well into the future. Yes, Facebook and Twitter are driving some of the extended activity on YouTube videos. As of last year, Facebook is driving more than 500 years of YouTube viewing every day, and on Twitter, more than 700 YouTube videos are shared every minute. But the fact is that one minute of watching, creating, sharing or commenting on a video is one minute less to engage in other social mediums

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Twitter Adds Private Photo Messaging to Mobile

December 10, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

As AllThingsD reported it would earlier this year , Twitter on Tuesday launched a significant revamp of its private messaging product, adding the ability to send photos via Direct Message. Twitter also added a swipeable timeline feature (which we also reported would happen!). All of this comes days before a highly anticipated Instagram event.

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