Posts Tagged ‘social’

Facebook Is Banning Developers From Using Its Data to Build Surveillance Tools

March 13, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Brands, media companies and nonprofits use Facebook's data for a lot of different things, but the company said it wants to make sure tracking people isn't one of them. Today, Facebook announced it's banning developers from using the social network's data about users for surveillance tools. According to the company, updates, which also apply to...

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There Were More Than 400 Million Facebook Interactions for International Women’s Day

March 9, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Some 160 million Facebook users were responsible for more than 400 million posts, likes and comments related to International Women's Day Wednesday. The social network said in an email to Social Pro Daily that 64 percent of its International Women's Day activity came from women, with 36 percent coming from men, and the countries with...

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Pinterest Just Acquired Twitter Co-Founder Biz Stone’s Jelly

March 8, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Twitter co-founder Biz Stone announced that Pinterest has acquired Jelly, the visual search and discovery platform he launched in January 2014 with Ben Finkel. Stone will join Pinterest as a special adviser to co-founder and chief product officer Evan Sharp, while Finkel will be added to the social network's growth product team. Stone said in...

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While Vine Camera’s Future Is TBD, the Lessons for Influencer Marketing Are Clear

March 3, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The announcement of Vine's closure toward the back end of last year marked a sad, nostalgic day for digital content creators. So it came as quite the surprise when, last month, Twitter relaunched the social platform as Vine Camera, an application that allows users to share their six-second videos directly to Twitter. It's too early...

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Unruly’s 2017 Predictions on Changing Media Consumption Behaviors

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January 9, 2017  |  Blog  |  No Comments

Here’s what you need know. In 2017, media consumption behaviors will only continue to change as emerging technology continues to evolve - staying on the cutting edge of these consumer behaviors is a big task! Unruly, a digital video distribution agency with a focus on emotional intelligence, has released their social and digital consumption predictions for 2017. Unruly’s managing director Oliver Smith will will be a featured speaker at our upcoming Engage: LA conference. The  report covers the following: Augmented reality has the scale but VR will have deeper impact. Vertical creatives will be the rule rather than the exception in 2017. Audio will have

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Stay-at-Home Moms Watch One More Hour of Media Per Day Than Working Mothers

January 3, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Stay-at-home mothers don't have as many devices in their homes as their working counterparts, but they make the most of those that they do have: they spend around seven and a half more hours each week watching TV and TV-connected devices than working mothers do. In Nielsen's Q3 2016 Total Audience Report, released this morning, the company focused on the media habits of mothers: working and those who stay at home. (Previous reports spotlighted millennials and the extent to which consumers are using all options available to them .) According to Nielsen's national TV panel, there are 25.1 million females in the U.S. between the ages of 18 and 49 who have one or more children under the age of 12. Nearly three-quarters of those women are working, and the older a woman is, the more likely she is to be in the workforce: Seventy-one percent of mothers between 18 and 34 are working, but that jumps to 77 percent of those between 35 and 49. While working mothers are more affluent and more likely to live in high-tech homes with several devices, stay-at-home moms spend an average of 36:26 (in hours: minutes) each week on live TV viewing and connected TV devices, which include DVR, DVD/Blu-ray, game consoles and other devices like Roku and Apple TV. That's seven and a half hours more than working mothers, who spend an average of 28:49 each week. Live TV viewing accounts for the biggest discrepancy between the two groups, with stay-at-home moms watching more than five hours of live TV each week (25:37, versus 20:08 for working mothers). While working mothers spend less time consuming media, they have access to more devices than their stay-at-home counterparts. Seventy-four percent of working moms subscribe to SVOD services like Netflix and Hulu, while just 65 percent of stay-at-home moms do. Eighty percent of working moms have tablets, compared to 72 percent of stay-at-home mothers. However, both groups have an almost identical access to smartphones: Ninety-eight percent of working moms, 96 percent of stay-at-home moms. On the social media front, stay-at-home mothers gravitate toward PCs and smartphones, while working moms use tablets. Across all devices, radio reaches the greatest number of working moms, who average 13:45 per week (stay-at-home mothers listen for an average of 12:07 each week). But stay-at-home moms spend more time with all other devices, led by smartphones: stay-at-home mothers average 22:43 per week of smartphone time, versus 20:41 for working moms. Live TV drop-off In overall viewing numbers, U.S. adults spent an average of 4:06 (in hours: minutes) tuning into live TV each day in Q3 2016, which is one minute less than the previous year

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Stoli Is Using Google Trends Data to Create Holiday Instagram Posts

December 1, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After you search for martini recipes this year, try checking Stolichnaya's Instagram page to see pictures of what the drinks look like. In June, the brand's premium Elit vodka line started analyzing Google Trends data to zero in on online chatter and use it to crank out stylized posts of bottles, martini glasses and recipes. For the holidays this year when searches for martinis and vodka cocktails spike, the brand is enlisting such data to inform an Instagram campaign called Elit Live Social Lab. If a recipe for a chocolate martini is trending online, for instance, Elit's social team will whip up and post a picture of a chocolate drink within 24 hours. Brand manager Lauren Ryan said that when it comes to which social platforms Elit prioritizes, "Instagram is first and second for me, and Facebook follows," because the visual platform is particularly conducive to targeting luxury consumers.

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Despite Post-Election Depression, Social Chatter Around Black Friday Is Mostly Positive

November 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Despite the negative nature of pre- and post-election social, Americans seem to at least be on the up and up when it comes to shopping. According to an analysis of social conversations conducted by the Marketing Cloud social team at Salesforce , nearly 80 percent of all Black Friday conversation have been positive in nature in the 30 days leading up to it. Salesforce—which so far has tracked 934,000 mentions of Black Friday and Cyber Monday—said 78.6 percent of posts have been positive, with leading topics including deals, the season and online shopping. The volume of social conversation about Black Friday seems to keep growing, with 2016 up 30 percent over 2015. (Last year, overall volume was up 20 percent over 2014.) So who's doing all the shop talk? According to Salesforce, 56 percent of dialog is coming from women. Also notable is that the higher percentage of mentions isn't coming from social-savvy millennials—the largest group has been consumers between the ages of 25 and 34, with the 35- to 44- year-old demographic also contributing more than other groups

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Facebook Users May Soon See Multiple Products Featured in a Single News Feed Ad

November 15, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Ahead of the holiday season, Facebook is testing a different kind of product ad that lets retailers showcase more than one item within the news feed. The two-click process seems to be focused on both brand awareness and direct response. The ads pair a main image or video along with related product images underneath and, if clicked, then bring up a second page with more products. If clicked again, the ad leads to the retailer's website where a consumer can actually buy the product. (The launch comes just weeks after Facebook-owned Instagram began letting more than a dozen retailers focus more specifically on ecommerce by tagging products in photos that then lead to a way to buy items online.) Some retailers like Michael Kors and Lowes have already begun testing the Facebook format this week. However, a Facebook spokesperson said other brands will ramp up their own campaigns later this month and through the holiday season. More could join early next year, with other industries beyond retail possibly added if retailers are pleased with results. According to Michael Kors, which has been using the format along with the rest of its fall campaign, cost per conversion has fallen by 79 percent. Instead of focusing too much on targeting a user with a single product, the goal is to give people enough items that might prompt them to shop more. The ads in some ways seem reminiscent of Google's " showcase shopping " ad format that launched for retailers this summer. Those ads, featured in Google search, aim to connect retailers with potential buyers who might be interested in a product even if their search query isn't quite exact. The formats seem to potentially point to a broader trend toward clustering retail items in a way that brings a number of product listing ads underneath a single main piece of creative. The approach gives users more ideas to consider beyond just the one image they might or might not be interested in. According to Facebook, this approach drives more visual discovery by letting retailers use as many as 50 products to target users.

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