Posts Tagged ‘social’

Twitter Asks You How You Use Twitter While You Watch TV, While You’re Watching TV and Using Twitter

December 24, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

As we’ve noted many times , Twitter is very interested linking itself with the TV business (Facebook too, but that’s a different story). And as we noted last month, Twitter has recently started asking its own users if they connect Twitter with TV , via online surveys. Here’s a new survey, which is even more direct about the Twitter/TV linkup. This comes to us via Eli Langer , a social media producer at CNBC, and what’s most interesting is that it: Is explicitly about watching football and using Twitter, and that The invitation to participate in the survey showed up in Langer’s feed shortly after  kickoff during last night’s Monday Night Football finale. Here’s the query:

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Oracle Acquires Cloud Marketing Player Responsys for $1.5 Billion

December 20, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Marketing software in the cloud is still pretty hot. Software giant Oracle proved it today by saying it will spend $1.5 billion to acquire email marketing company Responsys for $27 a share. The deal works out to a 38 percent premium over Responsys’ closing price on Thursday. The company went public in 2011 at $12 a share. Responsys has been mentioned often as a likely acquisition target since Salesforce.com acquired ExactTarget in June for $2.5 billion. That leaves Constant Contact, another email marketing company, available — its shares rose by more than four percent today in the wake of this deal. And while we’re at it, it’s worth mentioning that shares of Marketo, another cloud-based marketing company, are up by more than nine percent this morning. Oracle said it will combine Responsys with another recent acquisition, Eloqua, which it bought a year ago today for $871 million . The result will be a marketing cloud product that serves both the business-to-business and business-to-consumer ends of the spectrum. The deal will close early in the new year. Here’s Oracle’s original announcement: Oracle Buys Responsys Creates the World’s Largest Modern Marketing Cloud by Adding Leading B2C Marketing Orchestration Platform Redwood Shores, Calif. — December 20, 2013 Oracle today announced that it has entered into an agreement to acquire Responsys, Inc. (NASDAQ: MKTG), the leading provider of enterprise-scale cloud-based B2C marketing software, for $27.00 per share in cash or approximately $1.5 billion, net of Responsys’ cash. Responsys is used by the most respected B2C brands across the globe to orchestrate marketing interactions across email, mobile, social, display and the web, at massive scale. The addition of Responsys extends Oracle’s Customer Experience Cloud, which includes Commerce, Sales, Service, Social and the Oracle Marketing Cloud. By bringing together Responsys and Oracle Eloqua in the Marketing Cloud, for the first time CMOs that support industries with B2C or B2B business models will be equipped to drive exceptional customer experiences across marketing interactions and throughout the customer lifecycle from a single platform. The Board of Directors of Responsys has unanimously approved the transaction.

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Top Products in Two Decades of Tech Reviews

December 18, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

This is my last column for The Wall Street Journal, after 22 years of reviewing consumer technology products here. So I thought I’d talk about the dozen personal-technology products I reviewed that were most influential over the past two decades. Obviously, narrowing so many products in the most dynamic of modern industries down to 12 is a subjective exercise and others will disagree. Though most were hits, a couple weren’t blockbusters, financially, and one was an outright flop. Instead, I used as my criteria two main things. First, the products had to improve ease of use and add value for average consumers. That was the guiding principle I laid down in the first sentence of my first column, in 1991: “Personal computers are just too hard to use, and it’s not your fault.” Second, I chose these 12 because each changed the course of digital history by influencing the products and services that followed, or by changing the way people lived and worked. In some cases, the impact of these mass-market products is still unfolding. All of these products had predecessors, but they managed to take their categories to a new level. Some readers will complain that Apple is overrepresented. My answer: Apple introduced more influential, breakthrough products for average consumers than any other company over the years of this column.

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A Tale of Two Cities? A Q&A With Gavin Newsom on San Francisco’s History of “Animus” With Tech.

December 18, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

On the occasion of San Francisco finally getting its first major public Wi-Fi installation this week — nearly a decade after such an initiative had been proposed and awarded to Google and Earthlink — it seemed timely to call on Gavin Newsom. Newsom is the current lieutenant governor of California and former San Francisco mayor who had led the initial project. While still hurting over some political setbacks back then on the issue and wanting a little credit for his early efforts, he had some interesting thoughts on the history of intersections between San Francisco technology initiatives and public backlash against the tech industry. It’s a relevant and ongoing conversation as tensions continue in the city, which both embraces its tech hegemony and is also a little uncomfortable with the social and economic debates it brings. Representatives from local tech companies met behind closed doors yesterday with current Mayor Ed Lee for a conversation about “how the tech sector and the city can keep working together to continue San Francisco’s economic success for the benefit of everyone,” according to organizer Ron Conway, who said that specific areas of discussion included education, jobs and affordable housing. Here’s the conversation with Newsom, which has been edited slightly for length and the level of detail about local political skirmishes of the past. As one of the drivers behind the failed efforts for free citywide Wi-Fi when you were San Francisco mayor, what are your reflections on Wi-Fi launching on Market Street this week? I’m pleased, and I guess as a good Irish Catholic, you could say God’s delays are not God’s denials. It’s great to see the city step it up. I love the idea of Market Street because it’s the intersection of the old and the new San Francisco — symbolically, not just substantively.

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A Tale of Two Cities? A Q&A With Gavin Newsom on San Francisco’s History of “Animus” With Tech.

December 18, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

On the occasion of San Francisco finally getting its first major public Wi-Fi installation this week — nearly a decade after such an initiative had been proposed and awarded to Google and Earthlink — it seemed timely to call on Gavin Newsom. Newsom is the current lieutenant governor of California and former San Francisco mayor who had led the initial project. While still hurting over some political setbacks back then on the issue and wanting a little credit for his early efforts, he had some interesting thoughts on the history of intersections between San Francisco technology initiatives and public backlash against the tech industry. It’s a relevant and ongoing conversation as tensions continue in the city, which both embraces its tech hegemony and is also a little uncomfortable with the social and economic debates it brings. Representatives from local tech companies met behind closed doors yesterday with current Mayor Ed Lee for a conversation about “how the tech sector and the city can keep working together to continue San Francisco’s economic success for the benefit of everyone,” according to organizer Ron Conway, who said that specific areas of discussion included education, jobs and affordable housing.

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2013 Was a Huge Year for Android Gaming

December 17, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

For years, Apple has been the presumptive leader in mobile gaming, and it’s still in pole position. But if global trends in 2013 were any indication, its nearest rival, Google Play, is putting the heat on. That’s one of the conclusions of a “2013 Year in Review” report released today by app-analytics platform Distimo . Although the vast majority of app revenue in the West is still coming from gamers on iPhones and iPads, Google Play as a source of revenue leads in South Korea and Japan, two of the three fastest-growing markets worldwide. (The third is China, where Google Play is drowned out by countless competing Android app stores that Distimo does not track). Just how much are those Asian countries growing? Try a 759 percent year-over-year increase in revenue, in South Korea’s case: Apple’s App Store is still doing just fine, thank you very much: The report estimates that daily revenue for the Top 200 iOS apps grew from $15 million in November 2012 to $18 million in November 2013. But Google is growing its share of the pie at a far faster clip, with the Top 200 apps grossing $12 million per day, up from only $3.5 million the year before. That’s huge. Distimo’s top-grossing charts for the year further solidify the case that this growth is coming from Asia

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Facebook to Sell Video Ads

December 17, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Facebook Inc. will begin selling video advertisements later this week, according to people familiar with the matter. The ads, which will play automatically in users’ news feeds may help Facebook capture a share of the $66.4 billion advertisers are expected to spend on U.S. television this year. Read the rest of this post on the original site »

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Benchmark’s Mitch Lasky on App Discovery, Distribution, and the Power of Chat Networks

December 16, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Benchmark Capital partner Mitch Lasky is a games guy. He’s been in the business for decades — long before he went into venture capital — and when it comes to selling games, he has seen what works and what doesn’t. So it seems strange that Lasky is so knowledgeable on apps like Line, WeChat and KakaoTalk — some of the biggest messaging applications in countries outside the U.S. But it’s not so odd, considering that mobile games companies are increasingly moving toward these chat apps to help people find and download their games. I sat down with Lasky last week to chat about the gaming industry, and social games in particular, and what he had to say about chat networks is something every gaming company should take note of. Oh, and while he wouldn’t speak much about it, pay attention to the part in here about Snapchat, the buzzy messaging app he happens to advise and sit on the board of. AllThingsD: So talk to me about something I know a little bit about, but I hear is going to be big: Games distribution through chat apps. WeChat, Line and KakaoTalk are all offering mobile games for sale or download inside their main chatting apps. Why is this a big thing, and why are American companies interested in it? Mitch Lasky : It’s amazing –if you look at the Korean mobile app stores, 10 out of their Top 10 mobile games are being distributed through KakaoTalk. It’s totally working. It’s an unbelievably great distribution channel. So, why is that better than, say, Apple’s App Store? I want to know how it works so well. Well, if I told you, then I’d have to kill you. No, seriously though. I think you need to decouple the concept of distribution and discovery. Distribution has become completely commoditized.

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Twitter Tries to Get Your Attention

December 13, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Twitter’s great, but if you’re a regular human, you can’t spend all of your time looking at it.* So what if someone plops out something interesting, and you miss it? Twitter has a plan for that. Former Foursquare product head Alex Rainert happened to catch a glimpse of it yesterday, when Twitter sent a push notification to his iPhone, telling him that two of his pals were talking about … “Grey’s Anatomy.” As Rainert notes, he’s not particularly interested in knowing about that. But Twitter is very interested in TV, so you can see why it would experiment with different ways of telling users what people are saying about TV on Twitter. (Here’s an earlier experiment from this summer .) And more broadly, as John Herrman pointed out a while back , you can imagine Twitter using push notifications to tell people about all sorts of stuff that’s happening on Twitter. Note that Twitter has recently rolled out two features/experiments designed to surface interesting stuff for you — Event Parrot for breaking news , and Magic Recs for people your friends are paying attention to — and it has already converted Magic Recs into a push notification system. If you opt in, Twitter will start suggesting Twitter users for you to follow, based on the fact that your Twitter pals have started following them, too. (The most recent heads-up I received was about Danah Boyd ’s new “think/do tank” called  Data & Society Research Institute .) In Rainert’s case, he didn’t ask Twitter to tell him that his pals were talking about TV. And you can see the downside of this thing if Twitter pushes too many of these to people who don’t want them. But I think Twitter thinks the upside is pretty significant. Highlighting cool stuff is nice for power users, and may keep them more engaged. And it could be crucial for new users, which Twitter really needs : Hey, we know this seems like a lot of people jabbering about weird stuff — WTF is an RT, right? — but look over here! You might want to know about this . So I have a hunch we’ll see more of this. Even if we don’t ask for it. * I do know some people who look at Twitter every minute they are awake, but they are most definitely not regular humans, even though they are nice people in their own special way.

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QOTD: My Favorite Waste of Time

December 13, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

All writers should have as many forms of unproductive distraction as possible. For me it used to be that I would clean drawers or rearrange my closets or start cooking lunch. I had many, many ways of pretending to be working, but not really working. So Twitter is quite marvelous at that. It is a wonderful, wonderful way of just procrastinating … – Author Susan Orlean, extolling a side benefit of Twitter, on the All Write Already! podcast

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