Posts Tagged ‘social’

Twitter’s Tanking

December 30, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

After a wild run last week that saw them soar to an all-time high of $74.73, shares of Twitter are crashing brutally back to earth. The company’s stock tumbled more than six percent in early trading Monday, falling to $59.43. The reason? That’s not entirely clear, though perhaps investors are realizing that there’s no fundamental business change with which to rationalize last week’s run.

Read More

Twitter Reverses Rally as Shares Dive

December 28, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Twitter Inc.’s rally came to an abrupt halt on Friday. Shares of the microblogging site tumbled $9.56, or 13 percent, to $63.75, taking a dent out of the big gains that accumulated since the San Francisco company’s initial public offering in early November. The drop wiped away about $5.2 billion in Twitter’s market capitalization, or a little less than twice that of J.C. Penney Co. An analyst downgrade and worries about the stock’s valuation ignited Friday’s drop, burning many of the investors who had piled into the stock in recent days. Read the rest of this post on the original site »

Read More

QOTD: Sneaky Snaps

December 27, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Back when we had cameras that weren’t in our phones, it would be really strange to just walk up to someone and take a picture of them, or kind of place the camera on the table and try to sneak a picture of someone as they’re ordering food or something. – Kristen Wiig, talking about the “weird phenomenon” of ubiquitious/surreptitious photographs , on Vulture.com

Read More

Buh-Bye From AllThingsD! More Staff Highlights: Fried, Goode and "Everyone Likes Mike" Isaac.

December 27, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Like that proverbial pumpkin, at the stroke of midnight on Dec. 31, All Things Digital goes poof . As I noted earlier , while the archives of what we have written since April of 2007 — close to 38,000 posts — will remain in the digital ether for your perusal, and the whole staff of AllThingsD is headed for new pastures, that’s not yet ! Before we part, I asked the staff to send me their favorite posts. Yesterday, I put up those of Peter Kafka, Arik Hesseldahl and Liz Gannes , and now it’s time for three more (and more after that!). Without further ado: INA FRIED 1. Interview: Apple CEO Steve Jobs on How the iPhone Does and Doesn’t Use Location Information Key line: “‘As new technology comes into the society there is a period of adjustment and education,” Jobs said.

Read More

QOTD: Now You See It …

December 24, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Erasability used to be a mistake. – Digital anthropology student Olly Osborne , who is studying the implications of data emphemerality, in a series on Medium called “Data Death”

Read More

Twitter Asks You How You Use Twitter While You Watch TV, While You’re Watching TV and Using Twitter

December 24, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

As we’ve noted many times , Twitter is very interested linking itself with the TV business (Facebook too, but that’s a different story). And as we noted last month, Twitter has recently started asking its own users if they connect Twitter with TV , via online surveys. Here’s a new survey, which is even more direct about the Twitter/TV linkup. This comes to us via Eli Langer , a social media producer at CNBC, and what’s most interesting is that it: Is explicitly about watching football and using Twitter, and that The invitation to participate in the survey showed up in Langer’s feed shortly after  kickoff during last night’s Monday Night Football finale. Here’s the query:

Read More

Oracle Acquires Cloud Marketing Player Responsys for $1.5 Billion

December 20, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Marketing software in the cloud is still pretty hot. Software giant Oracle proved it today by saying it will spend $1.5 billion to acquire email marketing company Responsys for $27 a share. The deal works out to a 38 percent premium over Responsys’ closing price on Thursday. The company went public in 2011 at $12 a share. Responsys has been mentioned often as a likely acquisition target since Salesforce.com acquired ExactTarget in June for $2.5 billion. That leaves Constant Contact, another email marketing company, available — its shares rose by more than four percent today in the wake of this deal. And while we’re at it, it’s worth mentioning that shares of Marketo, another cloud-based marketing company, are up by more than nine percent this morning. Oracle said it will combine Responsys with another recent acquisition, Eloqua, which it bought a year ago today for $871 million . The result will be a marketing cloud product that serves both the business-to-business and business-to-consumer ends of the spectrum. The deal will close early in the new year. Here’s Oracle’s original announcement: Oracle Buys Responsys Creates the World’s Largest Modern Marketing Cloud by Adding Leading B2C Marketing Orchestration Platform Redwood Shores, Calif. — December 20, 2013 Oracle today announced that it has entered into an agreement to acquire Responsys, Inc. (NASDAQ: MKTG), the leading provider of enterprise-scale cloud-based B2C marketing software, for $27.00 per share in cash or approximately $1.5 billion, net of Responsys’ cash. Responsys is used by the most respected B2C brands across the globe to orchestrate marketing interactions across email, mobile, social, display and the web, at massive scale. The addition of Responsys extends Oracle’s Customer Experience Cloud, which includes Commerce, Sales, Service, Social and the Oracle Marketing Cloud. By bringing together Responsys and Oracle Eloqua in the Marketing Cloud, for the first time CMOs that support industries with B2C or B2B business models will be equipped to drive exceptional customer experiences across marketing interactions and throughout the customer lifecycle from a single platform. The Board of Directors of Responsys has unanimously approved the transaction.

Read More

Top Products in Two Decades of Tech Reviews

December 18, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

This is my last column for The Wall Street Journal, after 22 years of reviewing consumer technology products here. So I thought I’d talk about the dozen personal-technology products I reviewed that were most influential over the past two decades. Obviously, narrowing so many products in the most dynamic of modern industries down to 12 is a subjective exercise and others will disagree. Though most were hits, a couple weren’t blockbusters, financially, and one was an outright flop. Instead, I used as my criteria two main things. First, the products had to improve ease of use and add value for average consumers. That was the guiding principle I laid down in the first sentence of my first column, in 1991: “Personal computers are just too hard to use, and it’s not your fault.” Second, I chose these 12 because each changed the course of digital history by influencing the products and services that followed, or by changing the way people lived and worked. In some cases, the impact of these mass-market products is still unfolding. All of these products had predecessors, but they managed to take their categories to a new level. Some readers will complain that Apple is overrepresented. My answer: Apple introduced more influential, breakthrough products for average consumers than any other company over the years of this column.

Read More

A Tale of Two Cities? A Q&A With Gavin Newsom on San Francisco’s History of “Animus” With Tech.

December 18, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

On the occasion of San Francisco finally getting its first major public Wi-Fi installation this week — nearly a decade after such an initiative had been proposed and awarded to Google and Earthlink — it seemed timely to call on Gavin Newsom. Newsom is the current lieutenant governor of California and former San Francisco mayor who had led the initial project. While still hurting over some political setbacks back then on the issue and wanting a little credit for his early efforts, he had some interesting thoughts on the history of intersections between San Francisco technology initiatives and public backlash against the tech industry. It’s a relevant and ongoing conversation as tensions continue in the city, which both embraces its tech hegemony and is also a little uncomfortable with the social and economic debates it brings. Representatives from local tech companies met behind closed doors yesterday with current Mayor Ed Lee for a conversation about “how the tech sector and the city can keep working together to continue San Francisco’s economic success for the benefit of everyone,” according to organizer Ron Conway, who said that specific areas of discussion included education, jobs and affordable housing.

Read More

A Tale of Two Cities? A Q&A With Gavin Newsom on San Francisco’s History of “Animus” With Tech.

December 18, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

On the occasion of San Francisco finally getting its first major public Wi-Fi installation this week — nearly a decade after such an initiative had been proposed and awarded to Google and Earthlink — it seemed timely to call on Gavin Newsom. Newsom is the current lieutenant governor of California and former San Francisco mayor who had led the initial project. While still hurting over some political setbacks back then on the issue and wanting a little credit for his early efforts, he had some interesting thoughts on the history of intersections between San Francisco technology initiatives and public backlash against the tech industry. It’s a relevant and ongoing conversation as tensions continue in the city, which both embraces its tech hegemony and is also a little uncomfortable with the social and economic debates it brings. Representatives from local tech companies met behind closed doors yesterday with current Mayor Ed Lee for a conversation about “how the tech sector and the city can keep working together to continue San Francisco’s economic success for the benefit of everyone,” according to organizer Ron Conway, who said that specific areas of discussion included education, jobs and affordable housing. Here’s the conversation with Newsom, which has been edited slightly for length and the level of detail about local political skirmishes of the past. As one of the drivers behind the failed efforts for free citywide Wi-Fi when you were San Francisco mayor, what are your reflections on Wi-Fi launching on Market Street this week? I’m pleased, and I guess as a good Irish Catholic, you could say God’s delays are not God’s denials. It’s great to see the city step it up. I love the idea of Market Street because it’s the intersection of the old and the new San Francisco — symbolically, not just substantively.

Read More