Posts Tagged ‘social’

Emmy Advertisers Branch Out

August 25, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With the 66th Annual Emmy Awards airing tonight on NBC, advertisers are seeing the value in not just the air time, but in the social media opportunities that surround major live events such as this one. Part of the appeal is that most viewers watch these events on live television—instead of recording them on DVR boxes for later viewing—so they are more likely to actually see the commercials, rather than skip over them. And viewers of this type of event programming are usually engaged in talking about both the show—and the commercials—on Twitter and Facebook, reported The New York Times . One advertiser betting big on the event is Audi , who is the official automotive sponsor of the Television Academy for the fourth year in a row. According to Kantar Media, Audi was last year’s biggest Emmy advertiser, with a spend of $3.98 million, followed by Target at $3.48 million; Samsung at $2.99 million; Discover at $1.99 million; and Sony Pictures at $1.24 million. “Audi is thrilled to be returning as a sponsor,” said Loren Angelo, director of marketing, Audi of America, in a statement. “We look forward to honoring Hollywood’s brightest stars and introducing the all-new Audi Q3, demonstrating the brand’s devotion to style, technology and performance on television’s biggest night.” Audi started its campaign early, with a video featuring three past Emmy winners —Bryan Cranston, Aaron Paul and Julia Louis-Dreyfus—in a humorous spot that helped generate pre-Emmy buzz. It also began airing its #OffScript series of videos featuring Emmy-nominee Fred Armisen highlighting the Audi Q3 and encouraging viewers to tune into the awards. “Audi knows the importance of event-driven premium video programming and connecting that with the content we created specifically for real-time social integrations on the day of the Emmy Awards drives very powerful viewer engagement,” said Sari Feinberg, svp of client solutions and advertising sales at NBCUniversal. “This partnership reflects our commitment to deliver a comprehensive creative experience so our advertisers can reach our diverse audiences across all platforms in a meaningful way.” L’Oreal Paris is another advertiser planning to take advantage of the opportunities around pre-and post-awards coverage on NBC and sister network E!. The svp for marketing of the L’Oreal Paris division of L’Oreal USA, Malena Higuera, noted that the company plans to have a “significant presence” across all of the platforms, including television spots, social media and digital platforms like YouTube. “We have been advertising around the Emmys for 10 years,” Higuera said

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Islamic State Militants Exploit Digital Services to Disseminate Video of Apparent Murder

August 19, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The group calling itself Islamic State (ISIS) did something truly abominable by any humane standard today: They posted onto several Internet video services footage of a masked, black-robed man appearing to kill James Foley, a young freelance reporter who had moved to Syria to cover the unrest there and was abducted in 2012 from Aleppo. The video itself is about two minutes of President Obama discussing foreign policy with Arabic subtitles, then a forced speech by the captive Foley, the apparent murder, and some meandering threats of "bloodshed" by the murderer. I'm not going to post any links to the video here, so you can relax. Twitter was quick to respond to the breaking story, but unfortunately, much of the immediate reaction was simply reposts and screencaps of the video's most horrible sections and then immediate outrage. YouTube took action after a little while and removed the original post, but ISIS is exploiting a particular hole in the video ecosphere that has plagued law enforcement for a while: Anything that's disgusting or titillating enough gets posted, reposted and re-reposted with new tricks every few weeks to fool YouTube's automatic censors. For example, a few years ago, for a brief period, you could find any episode of a television show you wanted because uploaders had reversed the screen image; Marge vs. the Monorail was just as good flipped left to right, so for a while, illegal uploads flourished. Then YouTube got wise, and this trick no longer works. Recently, there's been a spate of video uploads that are simply a camerman filming a screen playing copyrighted content—that, too, is hard to flag, unless it's by hand, and YouTube says it deals with an average of 100 hours of new content per minute. With video content like the ISIS footage, the problem becomes even more complex, because users can upload and post information that is playing in a screencap, or is cropped or subtitled differently from the original post. Journo backlash to the post was swift—Foley was well-liked and his friends, colleagues and acquaintances were quick to push handout photos of him available at his family's website, which replaced his blog while he was missing. The site, FreeJamesFoley.org , seems to have been overloaded by traffic at this writing. More frighteningly, ISIS sympathizers tweeted bloody frames from the video at working journalists. Their accounts were quickly suspended, but their message was very clear. Indeed, plenty of accounts are still live with ISIS handles. Most journos responded with cutting remarks, but many said they were shaken by the experience. . @gladiatory48 thanks for my daily reminder that evil exists — Anthony B. L. Smith (@AnthonyBLSmith) August 19, 2014 And some services simply don't discriminate: LiveLeak has kept the video up and indeed, does a brisk business in gory images (another popular video on the site at the moment: Man Was Still Alive After He Was Hit by Train).

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Holy Shark, Syfy Builds a Franchise Without Traditional Ads

July 31, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Turns out your best marketing tool is word-of-mouth, especially if the mouth in question is filled with rows and rows of gigantic, serrated teeth.

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Inside ESPN’s Social Media War Room During the Most Tweeted Sporting Event Ever

July 9, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

I arrive late to the Germany-Brazil World Cup game on the assumption that I have plenty of time before the match really heats up. This turns out to be completely wrong, and I've in fact arrived amid the most tweeted single sports game—of any kind, ever. "Our banked Brazil content will probably not be seeing the light of day," Bryan McAleer, ESPN's associate manager of social media, says ruefully as soon as he's done shaking my hand and introducing himself. He's an energetic guy, upbeat and attentive, with long reddish hair and a thick beard. A few of the others sitting close by—clean-shaven, friendly guys with short hair—say hello, too. There is John Twomey, associate manager of social media, Tomas Ferraro, marketing coordinator, and Brendan Gillen, marketing manager. If any of them is a day over 28, it would be a surprise to me. McAleer, himself a senior director of sports marketing, is pacing back and forth between ends of the table, soliciting opinions and offering feedback

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Univision and Telemundo Are Battling It Out on a Digital Front

July 1, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Alicia Menendez is a digital and mobile junkie. The 30-year-old host of Alicia Menendez Tonight, a weeknight talk program about sex, money and power on Univision and ABC’s joint-venture news network Fusion , is practically fused to her mobile device, even when she’s watching TV. “I just want them in tandem. One augments the other,” she says one evening after filming a segment at the Univision/Fusion Newsport headquarters in Doral, Fla., just outside of Miami. A few miles away in Hialeah, Telemundo novelas Web producer Veronica de la Fuente trawls telenovela content to find fresh social media fodder. With hundreds of thousands of Facebook fans following the more popular soaps, it’s safe to say these aren’t your grandmother’s programs. “Things that never fail: the actresses’ dresses and the handsome guys of the novela,” says de la Fuente. The jobs of these women illustrate the contrasting ways in which Univision and Telemundo are reaching into the digital space. (Both companies have fought for decades to secure Hispanic TV audiences—a fight Univision has dominated.) Where Univision is looking to grow new digital businesses like Fusion and online destination Flama, Telemundo chooses to mine its existing strong suit—telenovelas—for digital iterations. They want the same thing—to attract young and active Hispanic millennials—but are going about it in much different ways. Growing Up Hispanic There’s a good reason the companies are aggressively building out digitally

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Sneaky Facebook Study on Users’ Emotions Draws Ire

June 30, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If you use Facebook and found yourself momentarily feeling either better or worse in early 2012, an algorithm may have caused your shift in mood. And that's what has some social media users upset today. A controversial research study published by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) on June 17 started to gain digital traction over the weekend. It revealed that Facebook for one week in January 2012 worked with Cornell University and the University of California-San Francisco to test the emotional reactions of nearly 700,000 users to pieces of content. The users weren't notified of their participation and unknowingly helped the researchers learn that people who read fewer positive words were found to write more negative posts, while the reverse occurred when consumers were exposed to fewer negative sentiments. The information-gathering practice isn't likely to be illegal since Facebook users sign away many privacy rights when they agree to participate on the social platform. And the study's gray ethical issues can be probably be debated ad nauseam.

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‘Katy Perry: Part of Me’ Movie Now Streaming to Facebook Fans

June 20, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Paramount Pictures is offering Katy Perry’s 71 million Facebook followers the chance to rent her 2012 concert-tour documentary, “Katy Perry: Part of Me,” directly from the social site. The launch is timed to promote Perry’s Prismatic World Tour, which will hit 62 arenas in North America starting June 22 after kicking off in the U.K.... Read more

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The Next Aaron Spelling? Showrunner Shonda Rhimes Is ABC’s Queen of Prime Time

June 3, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The pilot of then-unknown hospital drama Grey’s Anatomy was nearly complete in early 2005, but some real heavy lifting remained. Shonda Rhimes, a screenwriter who was taking her first stab at creating a television series, needed to put together synopses of the next eight episodes, telling executives at ABC just where the soapy, hospital-based drama intended to go in the near future. James Parriott, a veteran showrunner who’d been brought in to help steer the ship, offered to take half the workload. They only had a weekend to finish, he remembers, which would’ve been a tall order even for a seasoned TV writer.

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Listening to Beyoncé? Facebook Has an Ad for You

May 21, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

You've long suspected that Facebook was listening to you—now we know it definitely will be. With your permission, of course. The social network will serve ads to users based on a Shazam-style feature that picks up via the microphones on devices with Facebook's app installed—watching Breaking Bad? Check out this ad for the new drama on AMC. Listening to OutKast? Try Ludacris. "You can imagine how it could be helpful if you posted you were listening to a Beyonc

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