Posts Tagged ‘social’

Infographic: Here’s How Much Engagement Brands Got From Back-to-School Social Posts

September 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Now that the back-to-school frenzy has died down, Origami Logic , a marketing analytics company based in Mountain View, Calif., reviewed the engagement that brands received from back-to-school -related social media posts from the beginning of June through August. It was Disney and Dolce & Gabbana, which promoted its children's line, Bambino, that found the most success. " Disney and Dolce & Gabbana's results show that brands with large, highly engaged audiences can receive strong levels of engagement with relatively little effort if the content is even somewhat relevant," said Origami Logic marketing director Perry Mizota. "These two brand giants topped the social engagement charts with ease thanks primarily to their loyal Instagram followings with just a few timely and compelling posts." But Mizota warns that things can change quickly. "Another thing to keep in mind is that brands should target timely campaigns like these based on where their audience 'lives' in the social world," Mizota added.

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Why Internet-Famous Dogs Are Fetching So Much Love From Brands

September 13, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Social media influencers have transformed the way brands interact with consumers—and a lot of those influencers aren't human. Like Super Bowl ads that use cute puppies to sell everything from beer to ketchup, adorable dogs with huge social followings are getting a lot of love from brands these days. Dogs can fetch anywhere from $2,000 to $10,000 per sponsored post on Instagram, according to Rob Schutz, vp of growth at Bark & Co., parent company of BarkBox, a service that sends treats and other products to dog owners every month. Bark & Co. works with brands like P&G's Swiffer, United Airlines, American Express and Anheuser-Busch to promote their products with dog influencers on social media. "All sorts of brands want to tap into dogs," Schutz said. "Dogs are a common denominator for everyone, and they're safe, because everyone likes a cute or funny dog. They're not going to get in some scandal or say something stupid on Twitter and have it reflect negatively on the brand." "There's an innate positive feeling that a viewer has when they see a cute dog doing something," said Loni Edwards, managing partner of The Dog Agency, a firm that matches brands like Dyson, Barneys New York and Accor Hotels to dog influencers.

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Why Is It Still So Hard to Share Audio Files in Social Media?

September 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

While continuous advances in social media and mobile technology have warmly embraced the sharing of photos, articles and videos, audio has been left in the cold—despite the recent resurgence of podcasts. The absence of truly direct ways to share audio files, whether they be songs or podcasts, via Facebook and Twitter has left musicians and podcasters scrambling for workarounds in order to avoid the dilemma faced by application developers—fighting for attention in increasingly crowded app stores (mainly iTunes) and hoping for discoverability via search engines. For the most part, podcasters must resort to sharing links to their content, which does not endear them to social network users, who are often reluctant to click through and leave their networks for other environments, nor to the social networks themselves, as they tend to prioritize "native" content, or content uploaded directly to their networks. Workarounds do exist. Twitter's integration of audio cards from SoundCloud presented podcasters with the opportunity to post their content directly to that social network, but there are pitfalls there, too.

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Why This ‘Fear the Walking Dead’ Star Didn’t Watch the Original Show

August 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Age 46 Claim to fame Stars as Victor Strand on AMC's Fear the Walking Dead (Sundays, 9 p.m.); appears in the upcoming film The Birth of a Nation (Oct. 7); directs Barbecue at the Geffen Playhouse in L.A. (Sept. 6 to Oct. 16) Base Los Angeles Twitter @colmandomingo Adweek: What's the first information you consume in the morning? Colman Domingo: I hate to say it—I reach for my phone and go on Twitter. And CNN.com, especially because we're in the middle of this heated political season

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Olympic Roundup: U.S. Reaches 1,000th Summer Olympics Gold

August 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Saturday Michael Phelps finished his last competition at the Summer Olympics in Rio—and his career—with a gold medal, and Simone Manuel gave the U.S. its 1,000th Summer Olympic gold medal. The U.S. is still on top in the medals race. Here's what marketers need to know about the last 24 hours of the Olympics: American Women's Medley Relay Wins 1,000th Summer Olympic Gold Medal for U.S. Simone Manuel won the gold medal for a 4x100-meter medley relay Saturday after taking a silver medal in the 50-meter freestyle. The gold medal marked the United States' 1000th Summer Olympic gold. (NBC Olympics) Here's the total medal leaderboard as it stood going into Sunday, according to NBC Olympics: United States: 60 China: 41 Great Britain: 30 Japan: 24 Ruussia: 23 Michael Phelps Helps U.S. to 4x100-Meter Medley Relay Win in Final Rio Race In the last Olympics competition of his career—the 4x100-meter medley relay—Michael Phelps won the gold, giving him 23 career gold medals. "It turned out pretty cool. It's just a perfect way to finish," he said. (ESPN) Jamaica's Elaine Thompson Is the Fastest Woman in the World Elaine Thompson of Jamaica became the unofficial fastest woman in the world Saturday after winning the women's 100 meters

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Olympic Roundup: Michael Phelps ‘Not Coming Back in 4 Years’

August 13, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Friday Michael Phelps put an end to any speculation that he will return to the Olympic games in four years, and Katie Ledecky smashed her own world record for the 800-meter freestyle. The U.S. remained on top of the medal count (now 50) again on Friday. Here's what marketers need to know about the last 24 hours of the Olympics: Michael Phelps on Olympic Future: 'I Am Not Coming Back in Four Years' Ryan Lochte speculated that competitor Michael Phelps will be returning to the pool at the Olympic games in four years. However, Phelps himself confirmed that he is in fact retiring. (USA Today) Here's the total medal leaderboard as it stood going into Saturday, according to NBC Olympics: Leaderboard United States: 50 China: 37 Japan: 24 Great Britain: 22 Russia: 22 Ledecky Defends 800-Meter Free Title, Crushes Her Own World Record Michael Phelps isn't the only swimmer who made news at the Olympics on Friday

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Twitter Is Helping Brands Drive Conversations With ‘Instant Unlock Cards’

August 4, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Twitter is hoping the allure of exclusive content might help brands better engage with consumers and drive conversation. The company is unveiling an "Instant Unlock Card" that encourages people to tweet about a brand in order to earn rewards such as a movie trailer or an exclusive Q&A. The cards, which roll out globally today, utilize the social media network's conversational ads. The product, which debuted in January, contain images or videos with call-to-action buttons and a customizable hashtag. And Twitter says it works—during a beta test, brands saw an average earned media rate of 34 percent. (In other words, for every 100 paid impressions, the cards gained the advertiser 34 non-paid impressions.) Twitter is also launching advanced analytics to help track and measure the conversational units. The measurement tools, available through the Twitter Ads dashboard, show engagement and earned media metrics from each campaign. "Even more campaign insights are available to all global marketers through Brand Hub's Watchlist feature," according to a Twitter blog post. "See how many people are tweeting your campaign hashtag, how many impressions your campaign earned, and check out the most influential tweets. (Select US advertisers can also track the impact conversational ads have on their TrueVoice score, a metric to help track share of brand conversation in real time.)" To illustrate their effect, Twitter pointed out use cases by AMC, Coca-Cola and Marvel, which each ran campaigns on the platform using the conversational formats. For example, Coca-Cola used the conversational ads for its #TasteTheFeeling campaign and gained 180,000 mentions of Coca-Cola or the hashtag. The conversation drove the brand to become one of the top organic trends of the day.

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How Milana Vayntrub Quickly Rose From Surprise Ad Star Into a Creative Force for Good

July 25, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Vayntrub has appeared in 40 spots for AT&T, although she was only supposed to be in one. Photography by Robert Ascroft The first thing you need to know about Milana Vayntrub is that she's much more than the bubbly, witty AT&T store manager Lily Adams who she plays in the ads from BBDO New York—though she won't fault you if that's why you recognize her, and she's very happy to have the work, thank you very much. It's a sweltering July morning, and we're in the heart of Los Angeles' Silicon Beach, at YouTube Space L.A., where Vayntrub has sequestered herself to digest footage she filmed the week before in Azraq, Jordan. In January, she released a 13-minute documentary, Milana Can't Do Nothing, introducing the public to her own refugee story (her family fled Uzbekistan for the U.S. in 1989) and making clear the uninhabitable conditions that many Syrian refugees find when they do make it to Greece. Now she's working on a follow-up. She'll spend the next month hunched over her laptop, editing a new doc that will show people who have donated to the nonprofit she has since created, Can't Do Nothing, and where their dollars have gone, while using her own recognizable face to bring attention back to the ongoing refugee crisis. As we sit in the chilly editing room, the 29-year-old actress, director and activist—and now, Adweek's Creative 100 cover star—tries to reconcile the refugee project with her other creative pursuits. She has a bit part in this month's Ghostbusters, she's just wrapped filming on a new David Wain movie, A Stupid and Futile Gesture, and she's directing a new show for the Upright Citizens Brigade. She feels privileged to be involved in so many projects, and knows that at least some of that success is thanks to the high-profile AT&T campaign that's put her squarely in the spotlight on national TV for two and a half years. Since December 2013, Vayntrub has appeared in 40 spots for the brand, though she was only supposed to appear in one. Adweek's cover star is working on a second documentary about refugees. Styling: Xavier le Bron; Hair: Mishelle Parry/Celestine Agency; Makeup: Leibi Carias/Celestine Agency; Manicure: Chelsea King/Celestine Agency "The first spot was so successful for us that we thought, let's do another one and then another one and then another one. It was so well-received that we kept bringing her back," says Valerie Vargas, vp of advertising and marketing communications for AT&T. "I think Milana's Lily resonates with audiences because she's a multi-dimensional character in a way that's rare for commercials," says Hungry Man director Hank Perlman, who has been behind the camera for most of the Lily spots. "We try as hard as we can not only to make her funny but to make her as strong, smart and human as possible.

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Is There a Formula for Success at Cannes?

June 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Cannes Lions, the biggest advertising event in the world, is here. Vive les ads! Brands and agencies are keeping their fingers crossed that their campaigns will win the hearts and eyes of the judging panel in the south of France. But just what makes a Cannes winner? Is there something in the DNA of an ad that makes an award winner? Is there a formula for Lions success? Unruly dug into the data to find out if previous Grand Prix winners had anything in common that helped them stand out from the crowd. We analyzed four previous Cannes winners—Geico's "Unskippable: Family" (2015), Volvo Trucks' "Epic Split" (2014), Metro Trains Melbourne's "Dumb Ways to Die" (2013) and Nike's "Write the Future" (2011)—to see if there were any key themes or insights to success at Cannes. Here are the results: Winning Critical Success Didn't Necessarily Drive Business Results While these videos undoubtedly are beautifully made, highly recognized in the industry and worthy of creative accolades, brand recall and brand favorability from our panel were surprisingly lower than the industry average. Geico was the only advertiser to exceed global averages, including brand favorability (40 percent), purchase intent (40 percent) and brand recall (89 percent). Global averages are generally 29 percent for brand favorability, 31 percent for purchase intent and 74 percent for brand recall. This was most likely due to the prominent Geico logo, which appeared at the five-second mark of the "Unskippable" ad and remained on screen while the silent family held their poses.

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Infographic: Who’s Winning the Race on YouTube, Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump?

June 9, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Donald Trump is usually quick to boast about how much he's winning—in politics, in business, etc., etc., etc. But now, it appears he's winning on YouTube as well, according to web analytics firm Zefr. Zefr's analysis of YouTube views for the month of May found that videos about the presumptive Republican nominee have amassed many millions more views than the combined total of Democrat rivals Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. Views of Trump-related videos increased by 42.8 percent from April to May to a total of 254 million. Meanwhile, the total 106 million views of Clinton-related videos were only up 0.68 percent from the previous month. Total views for Sanders videos fell 16.25 percent to 69.7 million. "If all publicity is indeed good publicity, then Trump has a huge advantage," said Dave Rosner, Zefr's evp of strategic marketing. However, nearly half of Trump-related views (47 percent) were for videos that expressed a negative sentiment about the candidate, while only 17 percent were positive. (The remaining 36 percent were neutral.) For Clinton, sentiment was even more negative—48 percent compared with 4 percent positive and 47 percent neutral

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