Posts Tagged ‘social’

Fox News’ ‘Outnumbered’ Host Harris Faulkner Discusses the Role of Social Media in Journalism

September 22, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

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Fox News’ ‘Outnumbered’ Host Harris Faulkner Discusses the Role of Social Media in Journalism

September 22, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

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Fox News’ ‘Outnumbered’ Host Harris Faulkner Discusses the Role of Social Media in Journalism

September 22, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

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Fox News’ ‘Outnumbered’ Host Harris Faulkner Discusses the Role of Social Media in Journalism

September 22, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

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Fox’s Maria Bartiromo Follows Everyone From Matt Damon to Matt Drudge on Twitter

September 16, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who Maria Bartiromo Claim to fame:

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And the Year’s Hottest TV Show Is…

September 1, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The Big Bang Theory. True Detective. Orange Is the New Black. The Walking Dead. Which was the year's must-see show, on TV or the Web?

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MTV Uses Social Media for Global Audience Involvement

August 29, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

The power of live television and social media is helping to drive MTV Intl.’s global footprint and maximize opportunities for advertisers. Between the beginning of June and Aug. 16, the cabler produced eight live music events — from Durban, South Africa, to Italy to Malaysia — sparking sky-high levels of social-media engagement and drawing millions... Read more

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Emmy Advertisers Branch Out

August 25, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With the 66th Annual Emmy Awards airing tonight on NBC, advertisers are seeing the value in not just the air time, but in the social media opportunities that surround major live events such as this one. Part of the appeal is that most viewers watch these events on live television—instead of recording them on DVR boxes for later viewing—so they are more likely to actually see the commercials, rather than skip over them. And viewers of this type of event programming are usually engaged in talking about both the show—and the commercials—on Twitter and Facebook, reported The New York Times . One advertiser betting big on the event is Audi , who is the official automotive sponsor of the Television Academy for the fourth year in a row. According to Kantar Media, Audi was last year’s biggest Emmy advertiser, with a spend of $3.98 million, followed by Target at $3.48 million; Samsung at $2.99 million; Discover at $1.99 million; and Sony Pictures at $1.24 million. “Audi is thrilled to be returning as a sponsor,” said Loren Angelo, director of marketing, Audi of America, in a statement. “We look forward to honoring Hollywood’s brightest stars and introducing the all-new Audi Q3, demonstrating the brand’s devotion to style, technology and performance on television’s biggest night.” Audi started its campaign early, with a video featuring three past Emmy winners —Bryan Cranston, Aaron Paul and Julia Louis-Dreyfus—in a humorous spot that helped generate pre-Emmy buzz. It also began airing its #OffScript series of videos featuring Emmy-nominee Fred Armisen highlighting the Audi Q3 and encouraging viewers to tune into the awards. “Audi knows the importance of event-driven premium video programming and connecting that with the content we created specifically for real-time social integrations on the day of the Emmy Awards drives very powerful viewer engagement,” said Sari Feinberg, svp of client solutions and advertising sales at NBCUniversal. “This partnership reflects our commitment to deliver a comprehensive creative experience so our advertisers can reach our diverse audiences across all platforms in a meaningful way.” L’Oreal Paris is another advertiser planning to take advantage of the opportunities around pre-and post-awards coverage on NBC and sister network E!. The svp for marketing of the L’Oreal Paris division of L’Oreal USA, Malena Higuera, noted that the company plans to have a “significant presence” across all of the platforms, including television spots, social media and digital platforms like YouTube. “We have been advertising around the Emmys for 10 years,” Higuera said

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Islamic State Militants Exploit Digital Services to Disseminate Video of Apparent Murder

August 19, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The group calling itself Islamic State (ISIS) did something truly abominable by any humane standard today: They posted onto several Internet video services footage of a masked, black-robed man appearing to kill James Foley, a young freelance reporter who had moved to Syria to cover the unrest there and was abducted in 2012 from Aleppo. The video itself is about two minutes of President Obama discussing foreign policy with Arabic subtitles, then a forced speech by the captive Foley, the apparent murder, and some meandering threats of "bloodshed" by the murderer. I'm not going to post any links to the video here, so you can relax. Twitter was quick to respond to the breaking story, but unfortunately, much of the immediate reaction was simply reposts and screencaps of the video's most horrible sections and then immediate outrage. YouTube took action after a little while and removed the original post, but ISIS is exploiting a particular hole in the video ecosphere that has plagued law enforcement for a while: Anything that's disgusting or titillating enough gets posted, reposted and re-reposted with new tricks every few weeks to fool YouTube's automatic censors. For example, a few years ago, for a brief period, you could find any episode of a television show you wanted because uploaders had reversed the screen image; Marge vs. the Monorail was just as good flipped left to right, so for a while, illegal uploads flourished. Then YouTube got wise, and this trick no longer works. Recently, there's been a spate of video uploads that are simply a camerman filming a screen playing copyrighted content—that, too, is hard to flag, unless it's by hand, and YouTube says it deals with an average of 100 hours of new content per minute. With video content like the ISIS footage, the problem becomes even more complex, because users can upload and post information that is playing in a screencap, or is cropped or subtitled differently from the original post. Journo backlash to the post was swift—Foley was well-liked and his friends, colleagues and acquaintances were quick to push handout photos of him available at his family's website, which replaced his blog while he was missing. The site, FreeJamesFoley.org , seems to have been overloaded by traffic at this writing. More frighteningly, ISIS sympathizers tweeted bloody frames from the video at working journalists. Their accounts were quickly suspended, but their message was very clear. Indeed, plenty of accounts are still live with ISIS handles. Most journos responded with cutting remarks, but many said they were shaken by the experience. . @gladiatory48 thanks for my daily reminder that evil exists — Anthony B. L. Smith (@AnthonyBLSmith) August 19, 2014 And some services simply don't discriminate: LiveLeak has kept the video up and indeed, does a brisk business in gory images (another popular video on the site at the moment: Man Was Still Alive After He Was Hit by Train).

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