Posts Tagged ‘social’

Editor’s Note: Video Is the Latest Battlefront in the Struggle for Consumers’ Attention

May 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In pulling together our annual Video Issue this year, which we publish on the first day of the fifth annual Digital Content NewFronts , I had to gut check our coverage plan several times as news hit during the weeks just before deadline that altered and elevated digital video's place in the media and marketing landscape. Facebook, for example, continues to shape the future. Video is definitely a priority for the social giant, and Facebook Live video content is being created by a wide array of publishers, including Adweek, and viewed there at growing pace and volume. And at its F8 conference earlier this month, Facebook dropped a considerable amount of new innovation into the marketplace that will have a material effect on video and pretty much every modern media form. I'm still noodling over the mashup of Messenger, brands and chatbots. Is it AI-powered marketing at scale?

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Twitter Grows Users and Ad Revenue in First Quarter, but Wall Street Shrugs

April 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Twitter gained 5 million monthly active users in the first three months of 2016, breaking the social media giant's user-growth slump of the past two quarters during which it failed to gain—or actually lost—users. According to the company's first-quarter earnings statement, Twitter reported 310 million MAUs, up from the 305 million it had reported during the second half of 2015. Revenue totaled $595 million for the quarter, a 36 percent increase over the first quarter of 2015. Twitter reported $531 million in advertising revenue in the first three months of the year. That's up 39 percent from the same period in 2015. In the U.S., revenue totaled $390 million, while international revenue accounted for another $204 million. However, the company still fell short of earnings expectations, causing its stock to tumble nearly 10 percent in after-hours trading

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Put Away the Selfie Stick and Live Like a Local, Urges Airbnb’s New Campaign

April 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Travelers today, especially those using Airbnb to find lodging around the world, don't want to navigate throngs of other tourists for a glimpse of Times Square or Fisherman's Wharf. According to data from Airbnb, 86 percent of its users pick the platform because they want to live more like a local. That insight of living rather than visiting inspired the brand's latest and largest marketing campaign, "Live There." "Don't go to Paris. Don't tour Paris, and please don't do Paris," the ad's narrator advises over footage of selfie sticks and packed tour boats. Instead, the ad advises, "Live in Paris." The work, from agency TBWAChiatDay is aimed at younger travelers, or at least those young in spirit. It's focused not just on the millennial generation, but also on those who want to eat at local restaurants, meet local artists and avoid tourist traps. According to Airbnb, 52 percent of these younger-minded U.S. travelers find crowds at major tourist attractions to be more stressful than doing a tax return, while 47 percent don't like to be labeled as tourists when they go to a new place. With that in mind, Airbnb CMO Jonathan Mildenhall said he wanted the brand's latest work to push back against the modern tourism industry and capture the idea that people shouldn't simply go to a new place, they should live there, even if only for one night

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How It Feels to Go Viral, Then Watch Your Content Get Stolen All Over the Internet

April 4, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On a Tuesday morning in December, I uploaded my late-night talk show's 449th video to YouTube, then went about my day. By the afternoon, I was thinking this one—a mockumentary called "Instagram Husband" created for our Springfield, Missouri-based show, The Mystery Hour —might be different. The next day, when it hit 1 million views, I knew it was different. And by the time the next week rolled around, I didn't know which way was up anymore. When I came up with the idea for "Instagram Husband," I had a vague sense it had the chance to go viral, because when I shared the idea with people they enthusiastically related. I thought people I know would share it, the team that helped create it would share it, fans of my show would share it, and it would be a nice little feather in the cap. I never would have guessed just how big it would become. It's hard to accurately describe the feeling of going viral for the first time. The best I can come up with is that it's like you're dropped into the ocean with stray planks of wood, nails and a hammer. As you're frantically treading water, you're also trying to figure out how to build your boat at the same time. I'm proud that we built The Mystery Hour slowly from underground hit, to television, to syndication with good, live crowds—all in Springfield. The operative word here is "slowly." We slowly built things in a nice stair-step fashion. Then, with one video, I was getting calls and emails from press around the world and from people in the entertainment industry in New York and Los Angeles

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Launching a Subscription Service of Its Own, Fullscreen Joins a Crowded Streaming Market

March 30, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The past half decade has seen the rise of the multichannel network, where thousands of creators produce hundreds of hours of content to satisfy millions of subscribers. They are video collectives built on the back of the free service YouTube. But as such networks grow up, they are realizing "free" (or ad-supported only) content won't pay the bills. Defy Media, AOL and YouTube have recently launched paid services. The newest entrant is Fullscreen, the 5-year-old brainchild of YouTube veteran George Strompolos, who's hoping that among his 600 million subscribers, there are enough superfans willing to pay $5 a month for premium content with no ads. And Strompolos knows just who to target. "We're very specifically going after the teen and young audience that grew up in the social and mobile-first environment," Strompolos said. Fullscreen is not looking to compete with big-time SVOD services like Netflix and Hulu. Instead, Strompolos is looking to monetize younger viewers—the 13-30 set—who are already watching. Fullscreen's subscription service, called fullscreen, launches April 26 and will cost $4.99 per month, cheaper than YouTube Red ($10 per month) and more in line with NBCU's Seeso ($3.99) and Defy Media's Screenjunkies Plus ($4.99). It will be available on iPhone, iPad, some Android devices and Chromecast. So, what sets Fullscreen's subscription service apart from the others? Strompolos says it's all about community. "[Other services] do a really good job of giving you content," he said, "but they haven't necessarily succeeded in creating an environment where people discuss content." Strompolos wants the service to feel more like a hangout where subscribers chat about the content and become creators themselves. "They can make GIFs and riff off the content, really create the foundation for a community," he said. The service will feature a mix of original content from Fullscreen creators and licensed content. The originals are anchored by Grace Helbig and Hannah Hart's revival of Sid and Marty Krofft's 1970s TV series, Electra Woman and Dyna Girl; Paul Scheer and Jonathan Stern's Filthy Preppy Teen$; and Jack & Dean of All Trades

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These Are the Oscar Ads and Moments Viewers Paid Attention to the Most

February 29, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It may not have won Best Original Song, but Lady Gaga's show-stopping performance of "Til It Happens to You" from The Hunting Ground documentary was the top moment during a politically charged Oscars Sunday night. According to TV measurement firm TVision, Gaga's rendition of her song about sexual abuse, which ended with numerous survivors joining Gaga on stage, scored the highest positive attention of any moment on Sunday. The performance, which came near the end of the roughly three-and-a-half-hour telecast, scored a 2.00 rating on TVision's Positive Attention Index, which combines the total amount of time viewers are watching the TV set with the number of times a viewer smiles per minute. Vice President Joe Biden's introduction of his "good friend" Gaga had the fourth highest score on the index with 1.47. TVision measures actual "eyes-on-screen" to provide advertisers, agencies and television networks the second-by-second data required to understand the effectiveness of television advertising and programming. The company uses computer vision technology to passively collect viewer behavior, attention and emotional affect second by second, person by person from the natural viewing environment. Kate Winslet and Reese Witherspoon introducing a pair of Best Picture nominees scored second-highest on the Positive Attention Index with 1.65, perhaps in part due to Winslet rocking a sweet pair of thick-rimmed eyeglasses, which got a lot of chatter on social media. Can we go back to talking about Kate Winslet's glasses? #Oscars pic.twitter.com/8Cnfo3wTvZ — TODAY (@TODAYshow) February 29, 2016 The other two moments to score the highest on TVision's Positive Attention Index were the Girl Scouts of Los Angeles, and Sasha Baron Coen bringing back his Ali G character. TVision also measured smiles and attention separately (smiles for moments during the show, attention for advertising). Not surprisingly, Leonardo DiCaprio winning his first Oscar after six nominations rated the highest on TVision's Smile Index with a 2.75, well above the next highest moment—Spotlight winning Best Picture (1.50). The other three were The Hateful Eight's Best Original Score win (1.47), the Minions' clip (1.26) and Sam Smith winning for Best Original Song (1.24). Cadillac's "Rewind Time" spot that aired during the 11 p.m. ET hour scored the highest on TVision's Attention Index with a 1.54. The following commercial from Kohl's ( one of four the retailer aired last night ) came in at No.

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Q&A: Director of The Jinx Says ‘Making a Murderer’ Left Him With a Terrible Feeling

February 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Producer-director Andrew Jarecki says he continues to follow the subject of his most celebrated project, The Jinx, but he's not sure what a follow-up might look like. The 2015 HBO true-crime docuseries concluded in stunning fashion when Robert Durst, the black sheep of a high-powered New York real-estate family, effectively confessed to a series of murders. After pleading guilty to felony gun charges this month, Durst will be transferred to Los Angeles to stand trial for the murder of Susan Berman, one of the three victims chronicled in the HBO series. Adweek caught up with Jarecki after his keynote Friday afternoon at Social Media Week in New York, where the director discussed his plans for following Durst's trial and his take on Netflix's Making a Murderer. Adweek: How much are you planning to follow Durst's trial? Are you planning a follow-up to The Jinx? Andrew Jarecki: I don't have a concrete plan, but we're always filming stuff; we're always following up on stories. We're still trying to capture things that are happening. So at least we have the option on making something if it's interesting. How do you see Durst's trial playing out? I think he'll get convicted of murdering [Susan Berman], but there's no guarantee.

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Nielsen Will Add Facebook to Its Social Ratings to Measure Conversation Around TV

January 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For nearly three years, Nielsen has been measuring the social conversation around TV shows— but only on Twitter . Now, as it faces increased scrutiny over its ability to accurately measure how many people are watching TV, the company has decided to add Facebook to its social ratings. Nielsen plans to make the new data, which it's calling Social Content Ratings, available in the first half of this year. The new ratings will incorporate all Facebook posts, including those shared with friends and family, with followers, and publicly, and are expected to be available in markets where the company's Twitter TV Ratings service currently is (the U.S., Australia, Italy and Mexico). Nielsen also plans to eventually integrate data from Instagram. "The development of Social Content Ratings reflects Nielsen's commitment to continually adapt our services to meet the needs of the industry and is part of Nielsen's ongoing effort to evolve our measurement to reflect the total audience across screens and platforms," said Nielsen Social president. "Nielsen Social measurement is evolving to provide a comprehensive, standardized picture of how consumers are responding to program content through social media, wherever and whenever." The increased data should give networks and other content providers a better gauge of how effective their social marketing strategies are and insight into the relationship between social activity and tune-in.

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The Today Show’s Willie Geist Shares His Not-So-Guilty Viewing Pleasures

December 15, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Age 40 Claim to fame Co-host of the third hour of NBC's Today and co-host of MSNBC's Morning Joe Base New York Twitter @WillieGeist Adweek: What's the first information you consume in the morning? Willie Geist: The first information when I wake up at 4 a.m. is an email from our producers that summarizes the things that happened overnight and things we should look for this morning. But then I go right to Twitter. I follow so many people and news organizations from left, right, middle. I treat Twitter like a news ticker, basically. Then I click on my newspaper apps, go through The Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, New York Times, then I'll get a little deeper into it with Politico or Bloomberg Politics. What other social media platforms do you use? I use Instagram a good bit, but I use it less as a news source than just for posting and looking at images. Who do you follow? Mindy Kaling is always fun. I admire people like her who are so committed to Instagram that they'll be in a moment and still take a picture and get it up online. It's not purely promotional; you're actually following her life.

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Fullscreen Adds Former Hulu Chief as New COO

November 30, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Fullscreen continues to gear up for a big 2016. Less than a month after hiring its first chief marketing officer , the multichannel network has added former Hulu executive Andy Forssell as its new chief operating officer. Forssell will join Fullscreen's executive leadership team and the board of directors, reporting to CEO George Strompolos. Ezra Cooperstein, who had been president and coo will remain on board as president. "The media landscape is changing even faster than many of us would have predicted a few years ago, and Fullscreen is perfectly positioned to capitalize as that evolution accelerates," said Forssell. "I look forward to working with George, Ezra and the talented team at Fullscreen to continue building what is fast becoming a truly premier multi-platform media company." Forssell led Hulu as its interim CEO for a six months in 2013, after its founder Jason Kilar departed amid talks of a sale. Forssell departed later that year after Mike Hopkins was installed as the company's permanent CEO . Prior to that, Forssell had been Hulu's svp of content and distribution since its inception in 2007. More recently, Forssell served as CEO of the social video app ShowYou, which gives creators and content owners ways to build and monetize their own proprietary channels. Forrsell, one of the original purveyors of streaming video, comes to Fullscreen as the 5-year old network plans to launch its own subscription video service . Fullscreen's service will join an increasingly crowded SVOD world; Along with the major players Hulu, Amazon and Netflix (and CBS, Showtime and HBO), YouTube , Univision, NBCUniversal and Smithsonian Networks have all launched subscription products in recent months. "Andy is a proven leader who not only understands the new world of online video, he helped build it," said Strompolos.

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