Posts Tagged ‘social’

How Milana Vayntrub Quickly Rose From Surprise Ad Star Into a Creative Force for Good

July 25, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Vayntrub has appeared in 40 spots for AT&T, although she was only supposed to be in one. Photography by Robert Ascroft The first thing you need to know about Milana Vayntrub is that she's much more than the bubbly, witty AT&T store manager Lily Adams who she plays in the ads from BBDO New York—though she won't fault you if that's why you recognize her, and she's very happy to have the work, thank you very much. It's a sweltering July morning, and we're in the heart of Los Angeles' Silicon Beach, at YouTube Space L.A., where Vayntrub has sequestered herself to digest footage she filmed the week before in Azraq, Jordan. In January, she released a 13-minute documentary, Milana Can't Do Nothing, introducing the public to her own refugee story (her family fled Uzbekistan for the U.S. in 1989) and making clear the uninhabitable conditions that many Syrian refugees find when they do make it to Greece. Now she's working on a follow-up. She'll spend the next month hunched over her laptop, editing a new doc that will show people who have donated to the nonprofit she has since created, Can't Do Nothing, and where their dollars have gone, while using her own recognizable face to bring attention back to the ongoing refugee crisis. As we sit in the chilly editing room, the 29-year-old actress, director and activist—and now, Adweek's Creative 100 cover star—tries to reconcile the refugee project with her other creative pursuits. She has a bit part in this month's Ghostbusters, she's just wrapped filming on a new David Wain movie, A Stupid and Futile Gesture, and she's directing a new show for the Upright Citizens Brigade. She feels privileged to be involved in so many projects, and knows that at least some of that success is thanks to the high-profile AT&T campaign that's put her squarely in the spotlight on national TV for two and a half years. Since December 2013, Vayntrub has appeared in 40 spots for the brand, though she was only supposed to appear in one. Adweek's cover star is working on a second documentary about refugees. Styling: Xavier le Bron; Hair: Mishelle Parry/Celestine Agency; Makeup: Leibi Carias/Celestine Agency; Manicure: Chelsea King/Celestine Agency "The first spot was so successful for us that we thought, let's do another one and then another one and then another one. It was so well-received that we kept bringing her back," says Valerie Vargas, vp of advertising and marketing communications for AT&T. "I think Milana's Lily resonates with audiences because she's a multi-dimensional character in a way that's rare for commercials," says Hungry Man director Hank Perlman, who has been behind the camera for most of the Lily spots. "We try as hard as we can not only to make her funny but to make her as strong, smart and human as possible.

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Is There a Formula for Success at Cannes?

June 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Cannes Lions, the biggest advertising event in the world, is here. Vive les ads! Brands and agencies are keeping their fingers crossed that their campaigns will win the hearts and eyes of the judging panel in the south of France. But just what makes a Cannes winner? Is there something in the DNA of an ad that makes an award winner? Is there a formula for Lions success? Unruly dug into the data to find out if previous Grand Prix winners had anything in common that helped them stand out from the crowd. We analyzed four previous Cannes winners—Geico's "Unskippable: Family" (2015), Volvo Trucks' "Epic Split" (2014), Metro Trains Melbourne's "Dumb Ways to Die" (2013) and Nike's "Write the Future" (2011)—to see if there were any key themes or insights to success at Cannes. Here are the results: Winning Critical Success Didn't Necessarily Drive Business Results While these videos undoubtedly are beautifully made, highly recognized in the industry and worthy of creative accolades, brand recall and brand favorability from our panel were surprisingly lower than the industry average. Geico was the only advertiser to exceed global averages, including brand favorability (40 percent), purchase intent (40 percent) and brand recall (89 percent). Global averages are generally 29 percent for brand favorability, 31 percent for purchase intent and 74 percent for brand recall. This was most likely due to the prominent Geico logo, which appeared at the five-second mark of the "Unskippable" ad and remained on screen while the silent family held their poses.

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Infographic: Who’s Winning the Race on YouTube, Hillary Clinton or Donald Trump?

June 9, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Donald Trump is usually quick to boast about how much he's winning—in politics, in business, etc., etc., etc. But now, it appears he's winning on YouTube as well, according to web analytics firm Zefr. Zefr's analysis of YouTube views for the month of May found that videos about the presumptive Republican nominee have amassed many millions more views than the combined total of Democrat rivals Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders. Views of Trump-related videos increased by 42.8 percent from April to May to a total of 254 million. Meanwhile, the total 106 million views of Clinton-related videos were only up 0.68 percent from the previous month. Total views for Sanders videos fell 16.25 percent to 69.7 million. "If all publicity is indeed good publicity, then Trump has a huge advantage," said Dave Rosner, Zefr's evp of strategic marketing. However, nearly half of Trump-related views (47 percent) were for videos that expressed a negative sentiment about the candidate, while only 17 percent were positive. (The remaining 36 percent were neutral.) For Clinton, sentiment was even more negative—48 percent compared with 4 percent positive and 47 percent neutral

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Google Beats Out Apple as the World’s Most Valuable Company at $229 Billion

June 8, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Alphabet—Google's holding company—is also the world's most valuable alpha dog. Today, Millward Brown and WPP released their annual BrandZ Top 100 Most Valuable Global Brands, which tracks the worth of the world's top brands. According to BrandZ, Alphabet leads the pack because of Google's growth in advertising money, growth in its cloud business and the company's constant innovations. It's the second time the company has topped BrandZ's list in the past three years, after fighting Apple for the No. 1 slot. According to BrandZ, Google's value hit $229 billion this year (up 29 percent year-over-year) while Apple's value dipped 8 percent to $228 billion. Just two weeks ago, a separate report from media buying firm Zenith Media pegged Google as the world's biggest media player, controlling $60 billion in ad spend in the U.S. alone

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Publisher Reach on Facebook Is Down 42%

June 3, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Publishers who have noticed their overall reach on Facebook has dramatically declined over the past few months can at least have peace of mind that they're not alone. According to an analysis by SocialFlow, publishers on Facebook have experienced a rapid decline in overall reach during the past few months. The social analytics company examined 3,000 Facebook pages, most of which are publishers who have a collective annual impression count of around 500 billion reaching 600 million unique users. And what it found might be a bit depressing to all the hard working journalists of the world: In May, publishers produced around 550,000 posts that went through SocialFlow's platform—up from 470,000 in April—but overall reach from January to May was down 42 percent per post. That's a "pretty notable drop," said SocialFlow CEO Jim Anderson. "We said, wait a minute, if the reach is staying flat but the posts are going up, the only possible conclusion there is that my reach per post is going down," he said in an interview.

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Venables Bell Wins Best of Show at The One Show for REI’s #OptOutside Campaign

May 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Venables Bell & Partners took home the coveted Best of Show award at The One Show in New York on Friday night for REI's #OptOutside, a cross-platform campaign in which the outdoor retailer closed on Black Friday and urged employees and customers alike to get outside and enjoy nature on a day best known for rampant consumerism. "This is an amazing honor," said Will McGinness, executive creative director at the San Francisco agency. "This wouldn't have been possible without our incredibly brave clients who were willing to take their beliefs as a company and act on them in such a bold way. #OptOutside was an idea that came from the core of who they are as a company and ended up transcending marketing into an actual movement. Which is something you rarely see." Spark, Tool of North America, North Kingdom and Edelman also worked on the REI campaign. Adweek responsive video player used on /video. Ellie Kemper, star of the Netflix comedy Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, hosted the 43rd Annual One Show Awards at Cipriani Wall Street on Friday night, which honored the year's best film, interactive, cross-platform, IP, mobile, social, UX/UI and radio work. The One Show also hosted a separate gala on Wednesday night at Gotham Hall, hosted by Michael Ian Black, at which the print and outdoor, design, direct, branded entertainment, responsive environments and PR winners were announced

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Editor’s Note: Video Is the Latest Battlefront in the Struggle for Consumers’ Attention

May 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In pulling together our annual Video Issue this year, which we publish on the first day of the fifth annual Digital Content NewFronts , I had to gut check our coverage plan several times as news hit during the weeks just before deadline that altered and elevated digital video's place in the media and marketing landscape. Facebook, for example, continues to shape the future. Video is definitely a priority for the social giant, and Facebook Live video content is being created by a wide array of publishers, including Adweek, and viewed there at growing pace and volume. And at its F8 conference earlier this month, Facebook dropped a considerable amount of new innovation into the marketplace that will have a material effect on video and pretty much every modern media form. I'm still noodling over the mashup of Messenger, brands and chatbots. Is it AI-powered marketing at scale?

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Twitter Grows Users and Ad Revenue in First Quarter, but Wall Street Shrugs

April 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Twitter gained 5 million monthly active users in the first three months of 2016, breaking the social media giant's user-growth slump of the past two quarters during which it failed to gain—or actually lost—users. According to the company's first-quarter earnings statement, Twitter reported 310 million MAUs, up from the 305 million it had reported during the second half of 2015. Revenue totaled $595 million for the quarter, a 36 percent increase over the first quarter of 2015. Twitter reported $531 million in advertising revenue in the first three months of the year. That's up 39 percent from the same period in 2015. In the U.S., revenue totaled $390 million, while international revenue accounted for another $204 million. However, the company still fell short of earnings expectations, causing its stock to tumble nearly 10 percent in after-hours trading

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Put Away the Selfie Stick and Live Like a Local, Urges Airbnb’s New Campaign

April 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Travelers today, especially those using Airbnb to find lodging around the world, don't want to navigate throngs of other tourists for a glimpse of Times Square or Fisherman's Wharf. According to data from Airbnb, 86 percent of its users pick the platform because they want to live more like a local. That insight of living rather than visiting inspired the brand's latest and largest marketing campaign, "Live There." "Don't go to Paris. Don't tour Paris, and please don't do Paris," the ad's narrator advises over footage of selfie sticks and packed tour boats. Instead, the ad advises, "Live in Paris." The work, from agency TBWAChiatDay is aimed at younger travelers, or at least those young in spirit. It's focused not just on the millennial generation, but also on those who want to eat at local restaurants, meet local artists and avoid tourist traps. According to Airbnb, 52 percent of these younger-minded U.S. travelers find crowds at major tourist attractions to be more stressful than doing a tax return, while 47 percent don't like to be labeled as tourists when they go to a new place. With that in mind, Airbnb CMO Jonathan Mildenhall said he wanted the brand's latest work to push back against the modern tourism industry and capture the idea that people shouldn't simply go to a new place, they should live there, even if only for one night

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How It Feels to Go Viral, Then Watch Your Content Get Stolen All Over the Internet

April 4, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On a Tuesday morning in December, I uploaded my late-night talk show's 449th video to YouTube, then went about my day. By the afternoon, I was thinking this one—a mockumentary called "Instagram Husband" created for our Springfield, Missouri-based show, The Mystery Hour —might be different. The next day, when it hit 1 million views, I knew it was different. And by the time the next week rolled around, I didn't know which way was up anymore. When I came up with the idea for "Instagram Husband," I had a vague sense it had the chance to go viral, because when I shared the idea with people they enthusiastically related. I thought people I know would share it, the team that helped create it would share it, fans of my show would share it, and it would be a nice little feather in the cap. I never would have guessed just how big it would become. It's hard to accurately describe the feeling of going viral for the first time. The best I can come up with is that it's like you're dropped into the ocean with stray planks of wood, nails and a hammer. As you're frantically treading water, you're also trying to figure out how to build your boat at the same time. I'm proud that we built The Mystery Hour slowly from underground hit, to television, to syndication with good, live crowds—all in Springfield. The operative word here is "slowly." We slowly built things in a nice stair-step fashion. Then, with one video, I was getting calls and emails from press around the world and from people in the entertainment industry in New York and Los Angeles

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