Posts Tagged ‘silicon-valley’

Venture Capitalist Tries to Drum Up Support for Splitting California Into Six States

December 23, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Venture capitalist Tim Draper is out promoting a proposal to split California into six states , the better to serve each segment, rethink existing utilities and services, and get more national senate representation. He has submitted an initiative to the California attorney general in the hope of gathering approval to seek half a million signatures to earn a spot on the November ballot, and he held a press conference today. The plan has initially been met by skepticism, with no corporations or groups yet coming out in favor of it, and it’s far from being brought to voters, but Draper said he’s optimistic that everything will work out once there are “six fresh slates.” The new states would include Jefferson in the northernmost swath of the current boundaries, North California below that, Central California in the middle east, Silicon Valley in the middle west, West California including Santa Barbara and Los Angeles, and South California in the boot of the state. “Six Californias is an opportunity for Californians to get a fresh start, an opportunity to build new platforms for growth and prosperity, an opportunity to be awesome,” Draper said today. “The status quo is dying and sucking the life out of us, but Californians are still the greatest, most innovative people on the planet, and I ask them to innovate their government back to prosperity.” Tim Draper Draper is a longtime venture capitalist whose father and grandfather were also Silicon Valley VCs. He recently stepped back from an active investment role at his firm, Draper Fisher Jurvetson. While Draper didn’t explain today how a new system would be more equitable, or how it would be better positioned to negotiate large-scale topics like high-speed rail and water rights, he argued that a clean start could help trigger all sorts of positive changes. Silicon Valley leaders such as Larry Page, Peter Thiel and Balaji Srinivasan have recently alienated many people by floating secessionist viewpoints and expressing superior attitudes about tech creators and adopters. Draper didn’t do much to mitigate that divide today, saying, “Whenever I talk to people in Sacramento, they are not really in touch with what we are trying to accomplish in Silicon Valley.”

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Venture Capitalist Tries to Drum Up Support for Splitting California Into Six States

December 23, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Venture capitalist Tim Draper is out promoting a proposal to split California into six states , the better to serve each segment, rethink existing utilities and services, and get more national senate representation. He has submitted an initiative to the California attorney general in the hope of gathering approval to seek half a million signatures to earn a spot on the November ballot, and he held a press conference today. The plan has initially been met by skepticism, with no corporations or groups yet coming out in favor of it, and it’s far from being brought to voters, but Draper said he’s optimistic that everything will work out once there are “six fresh slates.” The new states would include Jefferson in the northernmost swath of the current boundaries, North California below that, Central California in the middle east, Silicon Valley in the middle west, West California including Santa Barbara and Los Angeles, and South California in the boot of the state. “Six Californias is an opportunity for Californians to get a fresh start, an opportunity to build new platforms for growth and prosperity, an opportunity to be awesome,” Draper said today. “The status quo is dying and sucking the life out of us, but Californians are still the greatest, most innovative people on the planet, and I ask them to innovate their government back to prosperity.” Tim Draper Draper is a longtime venture capitalist whose father and grandfather were also Silicon Valley VCs. He recently stepped back from an active investment role at his firm, Draper Fisher Jurvetson. While Draper didn’t explain today how a new system would be more equitable, or how it would be better positioned to negotiate large-scale topics like high-speed rail and water rights, he argued that a clean start could help trigger all sorts of positive changes. Silicon Valley leaders such as Larry Page, Peter Thiel and Balaji Srinivasan have recently alienated many people by floating secessionist viewpoints and expressing superior attitudes about tech creators and adopters. Draper didn’t do much to mitigate that divide today, saying, “Whenever I talk to people in Sacramento, they are not really in touch with what we are trying to accomplish in Silicon Valley.”

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Mark Zuckerberg Donates $1 Billion to Silicon Valley Community Foundation

December 20, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

The recipient of Mark Zuckerberg’s latest $1 billion philanthropic contribution is a Silicon Valley institution that primarily feeds other nonprofits working in education, health care and the environment. But neither the head of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation nor Mr. Zuckerberg would say much about how the new grant will be used. Read the rest of this post on the original site »

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Obama to Meet With Tech Giants Over Surveillance, Obamacare

December 16, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

President Barack Obama, facing growing pressure from Silicon Valley, will meet Tuesday with executives from Google Inc., Facebook Inc. and other technology and telecommunications giants to discuss their concerns about America’s surveillance operations. According to the White House, Mr. Obama will also meet with the executives to talk about progress with the troubled online federal marketplace, HealthCare.gov, and ways the government and technology industry can partner to boost economic growth. Read the rest of this post on the original site »

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I Shot the Serif — Why Didn’t Anyone Notice the Tumblr Logo Change?

November 26, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

While everyone was riveted to the change in Yahoo’s logo earlier this fall — mostly due to a monthlong Cecil B. DeMille rollout of the logos not used, followed by the I-made-it-myself grand unveiling by CEO Marissa Mayer — no one seems to have noticed a subtle but significant change to the look of the logo of another of the Silicon Valley Internet giant’s properties. That would be Tumblr, the high-profile New York-based blogging network that Yahoo bought for more than $1 billion in late May . And though it was not touted, the logo changed in mid-October, during an update of Tumblr’s dashboard. Along with making it more clean, several of the logo’s letters had their serifs squared up, in a move not dissimilar to the Yahoo logo change. In other words, some new sharp and straight lines, versus softer ones — mostly all-serif, but some sans-serif thrown in at the same time. Here’s the old Tumblr logo: And here’s the new one: I like this change a lot, almost as much as I did not like the new Yahoo logo. Then again, I am no font expert, and there’s no accounting for taste.

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Five Questions About Basketball, Tech and Kickstarter for Vantage Sports’ Cameron Tangney

November 23, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

You could call it the Bill James effect. Or maybe sports technophiles such as Mark Cuban deserve the credit. Whatever you call it, more and more professional sports teams are utilizing technology in day-to-day operations. The kind of advanced statistical analysis that revolutionized baseball and pushed the term “Moneyball” into the mainstream has spread into other professional sports in recent years. Last year, half the teams in the National Basketball Association used SportVU cameras in their arenas to log every movement on the court to track the positioning of players to better assess specific plays and situations. This year, all 30 teams in the NBA will have the $100,000 cameras, as Grantland’s Zach Lowe reported earlier this year. That means the information gap between fans and professional sports teams is shrinking fast. A recently launched Kickstarter project wants to further bridge the gap. Vantage Sports’ latest project, ProScout , hopes to track 16,000 different data points per game, with the goal of producing more complete, contextual insight. Fans would be able to follow specific players or teams for $1-$3 per player, per month, although the final cost has not yet been set. (A model player page featuring Steph Curry of the Golden State Warriors can be found here .) Cameron Tangney, Chief Technology Officer at Vantage Sports and a former Googler, spoke to AllThingsD about the project and the future of technology and sports.

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Katie Couric Deal to Become Yahoo’s "Global News Anchor" Set to Be Announced Monday

November 23, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

As AllThingsD had first reported in August that it was working on, Yahoo is poised to announce a deal with well-known television news star Katie Couric to do a high-profile online interview show on its home page. The deal is set to be announced on Monday, said multiple sources at the company, which could designate Couric as “global news anchor” of the Silicon Valley Internet giant. That title could change, of course. So could the deal or its timing, although it seems set now after months of negotiations with ABC News, which is both Yahoo’s online news partner and Couric’s current home network. It’s not clear when the show itself will debut, though. It is likely to center on exclusive interviews with a range of high-profile celebrities, business execs and more, done by Couric specifically for the Web and prominently featured on Yahoo’s heavily trafficked main page. There have been negotiations among the trio over many months, since Disney-owned ABC apparently holds rights to Couric’s digital output for the term of her ongoing contract. Some news outlets are reporting that Couric will leave her special correspondent job at ABC, where she has not actually appeared much. She also has a syndicated talk show that runs through the end of the season. It’s the latest flashy move by CEO Marissa Mayer to try to goose the staid image of Yahoo and provide users with unique reasons to come to Yahoo. Couric and other content initiatives are part of a larger plan to differentiate the site. Mayer has spearheaded the latest efforts herself, using her own tech celeb status, including hiring the New York Times’ tech reviewer David Pogue for a new tech site and also engaging in talks with well-known TV personality and producer Ryan Seacrest about possible ideas. As I noted in a previous post: This has been tried by the Silicon Valley Internet giant many times before, mostly without a lot of groundbreaking

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5 Digital Shows Created by Grown-Ups

November 21, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Silicon Valley has a lot of things going for it: advancing technology, an attractive environment for whiz kids, a (weak) stab at meritocracy among its residents, gobs and gobs of cash. But as anybody who's ever worked in the arts will tell you, money cannot buy taste. Frequently it buys whatever the opposite of taste is . Thus, the learning curve has been incredibly steep for video companies desperate to produce the elusive "premium content" that will command the kind of money that TV advertising moves every season, or, in the case of subscriber-only services, the kind of buzz that generates subscribers to pay-TV networks. At first, video services seemed to believe that "premium" meant "not cat videos," but after wave after wave of unbearable vanity projects

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5 Digital Shows Created by Grown-Ups

November 21, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Silicon Valley has a lot of things going for it: advancing technology, an attractive environment for whiz kids, a (weak) stab at meritocracy among its residents, gobs and gobs of cash. But as anybody who's ever worked in the arts will tell you, money cannot buy taste. Frequently it buys whatever the opposite of taste is . Thus, the learning curve has been incredibly steep for video companies desperate to produce the elusive "premium content" that will command the kind of money that TV advertising moves every season, or, in the case of subscriber-only services, the kind of buzz that generates subscribers to pay-TV networks. At first, video services seemed to believe that "premium" meant "not cat videos," but after wave after wave of unbearable vanity projects

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