Posts Tagged ‘silicon-valley’

Netflix Sides With Government-Run Broadband Providers

September 3, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Netflix filed a startling comment with the FCC today: the company wants the Telecommunications Act amended to allow for "a pro-consumer policy of limitless bandwidth," or to put it plainly, so government-run broadband providers can exceed limits set by the law. The company is echoing FCC Commissioner Tom Wheeler's post from June on the FCC blog, in which Wheeler said with surprising candor that phone and cable companies "chose to delay improvements in broadband service to the Chattanooga area market." If Chattanooga seems tangential to debates that are going on in Washington, D.C. and Silicon Valley, it's worth noting that the city does something unusual: it runs the broadband service available in its area. As the city's power authority says on its website, "Only in Chattanooga, Tennessee is 1 Gigabit-per-second Internet speed available to every home and business—over 150,000 of them—throughout the entire community." Why is it doing this? Well, to attract businesses—the city's unemployment rate is 7.7 percent, well above the 6.2 percent national average—and to improve its network infrastructure, which previously had been served by a cobbled-together union of T-Mobile, Verizon and AT&T's more interpid broadband arms. Nobody wanted to build the pipe necessary to fix the place up all the way out into rural Tennessee, so the city took on the task. "Federal preemption is appropriate when state laws unduly interfere with municipal broadband," said Netflix, in its comments on the petition to overturn the Tennessee law. It remains to be seen whether the FCC will agree but Wheeler has been dinged more than once as too soft on the cable industry and overturning these local laws would be a major blow to industry stalwarts like AT&T.

Read More

Jenny Slate’s Bedtime Routine Includes a Little Weed

July 30, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who Jenny Slate Age 32 Accomplishments Star of Obvious Child (in theaters now); co-star of FX series Married (Thursdays at 10 p.m.); guest star on Kroll Show , Parks and Recreation, House of Lies and Bob’s Burgers Base Los Angeles What’s the first information you consume in the morning? Oftentimes I grab my phone by my bed and read my email, but sometimes I’ll go into the kitchen and I turn on KPCC in L.A. and listen to NPR’s Morning Edition. What are your go-to social media platforms? Twitter . I have an Instagram account, but I don’t use it that often. My Facebook is defunct; I haven’t used it in years. Who do you follow on Twitter? Gabe Liedman, Max Silvestri, Dean Fleischer-Camp (my husband), Chelsea Peretti, Noah Garfinkel and then, you know, like, Cher. How do you get your news? I get my news from NPR. I have it on in the car all day. We don’t have cable TV because I’m in a constant argument with my husband over whether we should have it. I want it, and he doesn’t

Read More

Sony Announces New Board Of Directors Nominations

May 13, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

TOKYO — Sony announced the nominees for its board of directors, including five new faces, on Tuesday. One is former U.S. ambassador to Japan John Roos, a veteran Silicon Valley lawyer with an enormous array of contacts who may help Sony strengthen ties, including M&As, with U.S. tech firms. Among other new board selections are... Read more

Read More

F@¢K Yeah! HBO Renews Veep, Silicon Valley

April 21, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

HBO has picked up its merrily profane Beltway comedy, Veep, for a fourth season, while locking in the newbie Mike Judge strip, Silicon Valley, for a second run.

Read More

You Won’t Believe How Big TV Still Is

March 3, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As the upfronts approach and the NewFronts try again to imitate them, expect to hear a lot about the twilight of traditional television with the rise of digital video. But don’t believe it. A new study from Nielsen reveals the depth and breadth of both universes, and comparative viewership numbers aren’t even close. The study, conducted with ad targeting firm Simulmedia , contains plenty of insights, but among the most striking is the size of either industry. Nielsen rarely pulls back the veil on exactly how big the TV and video worlds are (they do mint the currency in the former, after all), but here it is in black and white: There are 283 million television viewers monthly (the population of the United States is 313 million), each watching an average of 146 hours of TV. Compare that with 155 million online video viewers averaging just shy of six hours monthly on mobile and almost six and a half hours over the Web. So while TV’s audience is still almost twice that of digital video, the amount of money in digital isn’t even 5 percent of the mammoth $74 billion chunk of change in television. What’s going to bring about growth in the former, said Amit Seth, Nielsen’s evp, global media products, is equivalency. ABC already offers digital options for audience deficiency units (ADUs, or makegoods), and Fox said last year it would provide Hulu inventory for the same purpose (neither network was able to provide comment by press time), but Seth said he foresees greater porousness between digital video and TV. The company isn’t just hoping for that—Nielsen’s oft-delayed DPR product, which measures non-mobile streaming video, is set to finally launch in the spring. Nielsen also will be continuing to refine a tool that other third-party data miners are already selling: purchaser data that gives a measurable ROI to advertisers. “We have access to 90-plus percent of credit card transactions, anonymized through a third-party data provider,” said Seth. “Do you shop home improvement? If so, do you shop at Home Depot or at Lowe’s?” Nielsen now knows. Content producers like NBCUniversal have pioneered similar initiatives, but it’s impossible to overstate the importance of third-party measurement as the analytics world gets more complicated. Lest this sound like too much progress too quickly, Dave Morgan, founder and CEO of Simulmedia, says not to worry. Business as usual will probably continue apace for a while. “The silos aren’t coming down anytime soon,” said Morgan

Read More

Venture Capitalist Tries to Drum Up Support for Splitting California Into Six States

December 23, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Venture capitalist Tim Draper is out promoting a proposal to split California into six states , the better to serve each segment, rethink existing utilities and services, and get more national senate representation. He has submitted an initiative to the California attorney general in the hope of gathering approval to seek half a million signatures to earn a spot on the November ballot, and he held a press conference today. The plan has initially been met by skepticism, with no corporations or groups yet coming out in favor of it, and it’s far from being brought to voters, but Draper said he’s optimistic that everything will work out once there are “six fresh slates.” The new states would include Jefferson in the northernmost swath of the current boundaries, North California below that, Central California in the middle east, Silicon Valley in the middle west, West California including Santa Barbara and Los Angeles, and South California in the boot of the state. “Six Californias is an opportunity for Californians to get a fresh start, an opportunity to build new platforms for growth and prosperity, an opportunity to be awesome,” Draper said today. “The status quo is dying and sucking the life out of us, but Californians are still the greatest, most innovative people on the planet, and I ask them to innovate their government back to prosperity.” Tim Draper Draper is a longtime venture capitalist whose father and grandfather were also Silicon Valley VCs. He recently stepped back from an active investment role at his firm, Draper Fisher Jurvetson. While Draper didn’t explain today how a new system would be more equitable, or how it would be better positioned to negotiate large-scale topics like high-speed rail and water rights, he argued that a clean start could help trigger all sorts of positive changes. Silicon Valley leaders such as Larry Page, Peter Thiel and Balaji Srinivasan have recently alienated many people by floating secessionist viewpoints and expressing superior attitudes about tech creators and adopters. Draper didn’t do much to mitigate that divide today, saying, “Whenever I talk to people in Sacramento, they are not really in touch with what we are trying to accomplish in Silicon Valley.”

Read More

Venture Capitalist Tries to Drum Up Support for Splitting California Into Six States

December 23, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Venture capitalist Tim Draper is out promoting a proposal to split California into six states , the better to serve each segment, rethink existing utilities and services, and get more national senate representation. He has submitted an initiative to the California attorney general in the hope of gathering approval to seek half a million signatures to earn a spot on the November ballot, and he held a press conference today. The plan has initially been met by skepticism, with no corporations or groups yet coming out in favor of it, and it’s far from being brought to voters, but Draper said he’s optimistic that everything will work out once there are “six fresh slates.” The new states would include Jefferson in the northernmost swath of the current boundaries, North California below that, Central California in the middle east, Silicon Valley in the middle west, West California including Santa Barbara and Los Angeles, and South California in the boot of the state. “Six Californias is an opportunity for Californians to get a fresh start, an opportunity to build new platforms for growth and prosperity, an opportunity to be awesome,” Draper said today. “The status quo is dying and sucking the life out of us, but Californians are still the greatest, most innovative people on the planet, and I ask them to innovate their government back to prosperity.” Tim Draper Draper is a longtime venture capitalist whose father and grandfather were also Silicon Valley VCs. He recently stepped back from an active investment role at his firm, Draper Fisher Jurvetson. While Draper didn’t explain today how a new system would be more equitable, or how it would be better positioned to negotiate large-scale topics like high-speed rail and water rights, he argued that a clean start could help trigger all sorts of positive changes. Silicon Valley leaders such as Larry Page, Peter Thiel and Balaji Srinivasan have recently alienated many people by floating secessionist viewpoints and expressing superior attitudes about tech creators and adopters. Draper didn’t do much to mitigate that divide today, saying, “Whenever I talk to people in Sacramento, they are not really in touch with what we are trying to accomplish in Silicon Valley.”

Read More

Mark Zuckerberg Donates $1 Billion to Silicon Valley Community Foundation

December 20, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

The recipient of Mark Zuckerberg’s latest $1 billion philanthropic contribution is a Silicon Valley institution that primarily feeds other nonprofits working in education, health care and the environment. But neither the head of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation nor Mr. Zuckerberg would say much about how the new grant will be used. Read the rest of this post on the original site »

Read More

Obama to Meet With Tech Giants Over Surveillance, Obamacare

December 16, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

President Barack Obama, facing growing pressure from Silicon Valley, will meet Tuesday with executives from Google Inc., Facebook Inc. and other technology and telecommunications giants to discuss their concerns about America’s surveillance operations. According to the White House, Mr. Obama will also meet with the executives to talk about progress with the troubled online federal marketplace, HealthCare.gov, and ways the government and technology industry can partner to boost economic growth. Read the rest of this post on the original site »

Read More

I Shot the Serif — Why Didn’t Anyone Notice the Tumblr Logo Change?

November 26, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

While everyone was riveted to the change in Yahoo’s logo earlier this fall — mostly due to a monthlong Cecil B. DeMille rollout of the logos not used, followed by the I-made-it-myself grand unveiling by CEO Marissa Mayer — no one seems to have noticed a subtle but significant change to the look of the logo of another of the Silicon Valley Internet giant’s properties. That would be Tumblr, the high-profile New York-based blogging network that Yahoo bought for more than $1 billion in late May . And though it was not touted, the logo changed in mid-October, during an update of Tumblr’s dashboard. Along with making it more clean, several of the logo’s letters had their serifs squared up, in a move not dissimilar to the Yahoo logo change. In other words, some new sharp and straight lines, versus softer ones — mostly all-serif, but some sans-serif thrown in at the same time. Here’s the old Tumblr logo: And here’s the new one: I like this change a lot, almost as much as I did not like the new Yahoo logo. Then again, I am no font expert, and there’s no accounting for taste.

Read More