Posts Tagged ‘ratings’

Why Telemundo’s Boss Is Keeping His Sights Set on the Other Football

May 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Current gig Chairman, NBCUniversal International Group and NBCU Telemundo Enterprises Previous gig President, Univision Networks Age 42 Twitter @cesarconde_ Adweek: You have a big portfolio as chairman of the NBCU International Group and Telemundo Enterprises. Where is your impact felt most? Cesar Conde: It's an incredibly fast-growing market, and we have probably the most compelling suite of products, regardless of language, that help our clients tap into this high-growth market. Historically, there's been a tremendous amount of focus on the U.S. But over the last few years we've started to build our business outside of the United States. You moved to NBCU almost three years ago, after 10 years at Univision. What's the biggest difference culturally between the two companies? What I have really enjoyed about being a part of Comcast NBCU is that we have a real mentality of running our businesses as owners, not renters. We really believe in making the investments in our businesses that will deliver long-term results

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Why Telemundo’s Boss Is Keeping His Sights Set on the Other Football

May 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Current gig Chairman, NBCUniversal International Group and NBCU Telemundo Enterprises Previous gig President, Univision Networks Age 42 Twitter @cesarconde_ Adweek: You have a big portfolio as chairman of the NBCU International Group and Telemundo Enterprises. Where is your impact felt most? Cesar Conde: It's an incredibly fast-growing market, and we have probably the most compelling suite of products, regardless of language, that help our clients tap into this high-growth market. Historically, there's been a tremendous amount of focus on the U.S. But over the last few years we've started to build our business outside of the United States. You moved to NBCU almost three years ago, after 10 years at Univision

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Ratings Plummet for NCAA Championship After Its Move to Cable

April 5, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

At the beginning of the 2016 NCAA Tournament, Turner Broadcasting president David Levy claimed the difference between broadcast and cable "is almost non existent anymore." However, despite a National Championship game that will go down as a classic—Villanova defeated North Carolina on Kris Jenkins' three-pointer as the clock expired—the NCAA title game averaged 10 million fewer viewers than last year. This was also the first year the title game aired on cable TV. Monday night's game averaged 17.8 million across TBS, TNT and truTV, down 37 percent from the 28.3 million that watched Duke beat Wisconsin last April on CBS. In terms of household rating—the metric by which sports ad sales are sold— Monday's game notched a 13.2, down 38 percent. It was the lowest-rated National Championship game ever. From now until the end of the rights deal—through 2024—CBS and TBS will alternate airing the Championships and Final Four. But attributing the steep drop to moving the game from broadcast to cable only tells part of the story. Cable networks, even those with wide carriage like TBS, still have a far smaller reach compared to their broadcast counterparts. But they can still draw a crowd.

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With Its Total Audience Measurement Delayed, Nielsen Will Share More Connected TV Data

March 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Networks will have to wait a few months longer for full access to Nielsen's new Total Audience Measurement data, but in the interim, the company is preparing to share more information about usage of connected TV devices like Roku and Apple TV. Nielsen announced today that beginning April 25, it will make brand-level data available from connected TV devices, including streaming video devices and game consoles—Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, Google Chromecast, Xbox, Sony PlayStation and Nintendo Wii—as well as enabled smart TVs. This will allow clients to track how many homes across the country own TV connected devices and which brands, and how those numbers grow over time. Clients will be able to determine how much time people spend with devices overall and link program viewing to those specific devices. The company is also creating a new metric called Total Use of Television (TUT), which adds connected TV usage to linear usage for what Nielsen calls "a complete view" of TV usage. "Our device breakout data will report how much viewing to a particular network, program, episode or telecast came from a particular device type or device brand for measured content," said Sara Erichson, evp, client solutions and audience insights.

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Little Big Shots Draws 14.8 Million Viewers, and NBC Looks to Cash In With Advertisers

March 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

NBC is used to dominating broadcast ratings on Sunday nights, but it usually only happens during football season. The network's Sunday fortunes routinely dry up once Sunday Night Football signs off for the year. But NBC felt like Christmas (or the next NFL season) came early when it looked at this Sunday night's ratings. The debut of Little Big Shots, the Steve Harvey-hosted variety show that showcases talented kids, drew 14.8 million viewers overall and a 2.8 rating in the 18-49 demographic (which translates to around 3.56 million viewers). It was NBC's most-watched regular Sunday entertainment telecast since March 13, 2005, when an episode of Law & Order: Criminal Intent attracted 15.7 million viewers. The total viewer ratings improved on the show's post-Voice debut on Tuesday, when 12.8 million viewers tuned in and it had a 2.9 rating among 18- to 49-year-olds. It marked the first time NBC has won an in-season Sunday outright among broadcast networks in the 18-49 demo with a full night of entertainment series programming since April 8, 2004 (when the lineup consisted of Dateline, a Law & Order: Criminal Intent repeat and Crossing Jordan). And while most new shows lose viewers during the hour, Little Big Shots actually gained audience in its second half, jumping from a 2.6 demo rating to a 3.1. Now, with a surprise midseason hit on its hands—one that could help NBC hold on to the coveted 18-49 demo crown for the third year in a row —NBCUniversal's ad sales team has six episodes of the series left to try and cash in with advertisers. "We still have a little bit of time to do something fun, and we're certainly going to be out there in the next week or two trying to find people in the scatter market that are interested in figuring that out," said Dan Lovinger, evp, entertainment ad sales group, NBCUniversal. "But the last thing we want to do is something hasty that isn't well thought out

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The Oscars Draws Its Smallest 18- to 49-Year-Old Audience in at Least 20 Years

February 29, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Finding out how Oscars host Chris Rock would address the #OscarsSoWhite controversy didn't prove to be enough of a draw for audiences Sunday night. Just 34.3 million total viewers tuned into the 88th Academy Awards on ABC, according to Nielsen fast nationals. The telecast pulled a 10.4 rating among adults ages 18 to 49, which translates to around 13.2 million viewers in the demo. If those numbers hold when final national ratings are released Tuesday morning, it will be the smallest 18-49 Oscars audience in at least two decades. The previous low came last year, when just under 14 million tuned in. In total viewers, the ceremony looks to be the third lowest rated Academy Awards telecast since 1974, which is as far back as Nielsen has telecast data for. Only the 2003 ceremony (33 million) and 2008 (32 million) had lower ratings. In 2005, when Rock last hosted, 42.1 million people tuned in. Last year, 37.3 million watched Birdman win best picture.

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Grease Live Draws 12.2 Million Viewers, Making Fox’s First Live Musical a Hit

February 1, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Fox has chills, and they're multiplying. That's because Grease Live, the network's first foray into the live musical genre that NBC has owned since 2013, was a huge success for the network Sunday night. Grease Live attracted 12.2 million viewers and a 4.3 rating among adults ages 18 to 49, according to preliminary Nielsen numbers. That tops the 11.5 million viewers and 3.4 demo rating for NBC's The Wiz Live in December and comes close to the numbers for NBC's biggest live musical: 2013's The Sound of Music Live, which drew 18.6 million total viewers and a 4.6 rating in the demo. The show was particularly strong among younger viewers, with a 3.7 rating in adults 18-34 and teens. The teen rating was 23 percent higher than Sound of Music's numbers, Fox noted. (While the network has stopped reporting live-plus-same-day ratings , it makes exceptions for live events like Grease.) The ratings are also good news for Coca-Cola, which sponsored Grease Live with period-appropriate integrations and also ran three spots during the show. Grease Live's success is one last win for former Fox chief Kevin Reilly, who green-lit the musical in April 2014, less than two months before he stepped down. "The truth is, Grease was ordered before we came to the network. We were thrilled with it and embraced it," Gary Newman, co-CEO and co-chairman of Fox Television Studios, told Adweek last month. While there were plenty of questions leading up to last night's musical—How would the rainstorm pelting Los Angeles impact the show, part of which was set on the Warner Bros. backlot? Would Vanessa Hudgens, who played Rizzo, be able to carry on after the tragic death of her father a day earlier?—audiences were most dazzled by the technical wizardry of director Thomas Kail, who also helmed the Broadway sensation Hamilton. The show had 1.2 million tweets, with the most-tweeted minute occurring at 8:31 p.m. ET, after Boyz II Men sang "Beauty School Dropout." The most TiVo'd moment came at 9:26 p.m., when Sandy (played by Julianne Hough) stands up for Rizzo, who sings "There are Worse Things I Could Do." In addition to Kail's euphoric camera work, the show was given an energy boost by the inclusion of a live audience, which have not been a part of NBC's musicals. "It's just one of the ideas we are doing to sort of burst open the genre of a live television musical," said executive producer Marc Platt. The production took over two soundstages and half of the Warner Bros. backlot, where the finale's carnival scene took place

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In a Good Sign for the Super Bowl, CBS Celebrates Highest-Rated AFC Championship in 29 Years

January 25, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Peyton Manning's nailbiter victory over Tom Brady helped drive Sunday's AFC Championship game to its highest ratings in 29 years, according to early estimates from Nielsen. In early numbers, which will be adjusted and updated later today, CBS said the AFC Championship—in which the Denver Broncos held off a last-second comeback attempt by the New England Patriots, to win 20-18—was the highest-rated telecast since last year's Super Bowl, which drew 111.4 million viewers and a 49.7 rating in adults 18-49 . While those numbers were likely boosted by East Coast residents snowed in for the weekend by Winter Storm Jonas, they are music to CBS' ears as the network gears up to air Super Bowl 50 on Feb. 7. With an average overnight household rating of 31.8, the game was the highest-rated AFC Championship in 29 years, since the Denver Broncos beat the Cleveland Browns in overtime in 1987. The household rating was 19 percent higher than the NFC Championship game which followed on Fox, and up 31 percent from last year's AFC Championship game, which aired in the later, prime time slot. That should translate to more than 50 million viewers when updated figures are available later today. 40.7 million (14.3 rating in 18-49) watched last night's NFC Championship on Fox, where the Carolina Panthers streamrolled the Arizona Cardinals, 49-15. A reported 20.6 million stuck around for the postgame, and 13.5 million (5.1 in 18-49) watched the 10:30-11 portion of The X-Files, which because of an usually long postgame, didn't start until around 10:24 p.m. ET. It's a solid start for The X-Files, which Fox is betting will reverse the recent spotty track record of revivals and reboots . The second episode airs tonight at 8 p.m. ET/PT, the show's regular time slot. As part of the show's elaborate marketing campaign , Fox ran spots during every NFL game this season, touting the show's post-NFC Championship premiere. Its series finale in 2002 drew 13.3 million. That is an improvement upon Fox's post-NFC Championship programming two years ago, the Season 2 premiere of its Kevin Bacon drama The Following, which drew 11.2 million total viewers and a 4.4 rating in 18-49

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Nielsen Will Add Facebook to Its Social Ratings to Measure Conversation Around TV

January 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For nearly three years, Nielsen has been measuring the social conversation around TV shows— but only on Twitter . Now, as it faces increased scrutiny over its ability to accurately measure how many people are watching TV, the company has decided to add Facebook to its social ratings. Nielsen plans to make the new data, which it's calling Social Content Ratings, available in the first half of this year. The new ratings will incorporate all Facebook posts, including those shared with friends and family, with followers, and publicly, and are expected to be available in markets where the company's Twitter TV Ratings service currently is (the U.S., Australia, Italy and Mexico). Nielsen also plans to eventually integrate data from Instagram. "The development of Social Content Ratings reflects Nielsen's commitment to continually adapt our services to meet the needs of the industry and is part of Nielsen's ongoing effort to evolve our measurement to reflect the total audience across screens and platforms," said Nielsen Social president. "Nielsen Social measurement is evolving to provide a comprehensive, standardized picture of how consumers are responding to program content through social media, wherever and whenever." The increased data should give networks and other content providers a better gauge of how effective their social marketing strategies are and insight into the relationship between social activity and tune-in.

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Symphony Brushes Off Netflix Attacks on Its Ratings Metrics

January 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If Netflix was hoping to intimidate Symphony Advanced Media into submission when it blasted the company's data —which, for the first time, revealed how many viewers are watching Netflix's original series —it is going to have to switch to Plan B. Symphony Advanced Media told Adweek today it is standing by its metrics, which Netflix's chief content officer Ted Sarandos derided as "remarkably inaccurate data" that "doesn't reflect any sense of reality of anything that we keep track of." Despite Sarandos' scoffing, "we have confidence in our data," said Laura Bernstein, Symphony's svp of client solutions. She said that Symphony's multiplatform measurement tool, VideoPulse, also measures broadcast and cable programming, and the company's partners and clients—which include NBCUniversal, A+E Networks and Viacom—have said Symphony's numbers echo the data they receive from other ratings sources like Nielsen. "There's some variation—there's different methodologies to data collection—but for the most part, we're very in line with other published numbers and with what our clients would expect. So our methodology is where people would want it to be on the broadcast and cable, where there is a comparison, which gives us a lot of confidence in what we're seeing in the streaming originals," said Bernstein. NBC kickstarted Symphony's battle with Netflix last Wednesday, when NBCUniversal's ratings guru Alan Wurtzel shared Symphony's Netflix data with reporters during the Television Critics Association's winter press tour. Wurtzel claimed Netflix doesn't yet pose a "consistent" threat to broadcasters. To make his point, Wurtzel incorporated data from Symphony Advanced Media, which has been tracking Netflix ratings metrics for the notoriously tight-lipped streaming service with VideoPulse, the multiplatform measurement tool Symphony unveiled last September . (Symphony does that by using automatic content recognition, or ACR, software embedded on a mobile app to recognize and match a program's audio files, as well as URL matches for streamed content. The company also sends a targeted survey to its panelists twice a week, asking which platform they watched specific programs on, to determine whether a show like Quantico was viewed via Hulu, VOD, ABC.com or DVR.) Among the Symphony data that Wurtzel shared: Each episode of Marvel's Jessica Jones averaged 4.8 million viewers in the 18-49 demographic within 35 days of its November premiere. Master of None drew 3.9 million in the demo and Narcos was third with 3.2 million. Sarandos returned fire on Sunday, blasting Symphony's methodology and data. "It's a bold statement for them to make," said Bernstein of the company's response. "We've never had a conversation with Netflix, so I'm not even familiar with what they know of our methodology." And while Sarandos argued that the 18-49 demo "means nothing" to Netflix, Symphony counters that the demographic is in fact incredibly important to the industry. "It's the demo that matters to the people who are selling advertising, so I do think that makes it an important demo," she said.

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