Posts Tagged ‘ratings’

The Trump Phenomenon Delivered Massive Ratings for Cable News Throughout

November 9, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Say what you want about the outcome, but the 2016 presidential election cycle was unlike any the news media has ever experienced. As you might expect, cable news reaped significant benefits from the volatility of the race in the form of huge ratings. Fox News beat CNN in total audience on election night 2016 during the full coverage block, from 7 p.m. to 3 a.m. Per Nielsen data, FNC delivered 12.2 million viewers compared to CNN's 11.2 million. Fox News' viewership climbed on an hourly basis through midnight, while both CNN and MSNBC peaked at around 10 p.m. The ratings trends seem make sense considering now President-elect Donald Trump gained momentum as the night went on, while Hillary Clinton steadily lost steam. Fox News also beat CNN in the all-important 2-3 a.m. time period, when the race was called. CNN did make some ratings history in prime time, as 13.3 million total viewers tuned into the network's Election Night in America coverage

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Presidential Debates Set Ratings Records in 2016, but Does the Format Need to Change?

October 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The results are in, and 2016 delivered the most viewers of any presidential debate cycle in U.S. TV history. Wednesday's third and final debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump brought in 71.6 million viewers, making it the third-most-watched debate ever, behind only Clinton-Trump I (84 million) and Jimmy Carter-Ronald Reagan on Oct. 28, 1980 (80.6 million). The three Clinton-Trump debates and the Tim Kaine-Mike Pence vice presidential debate delivered a total of 259 million viewers, per data from Nielsen Media Research. The 1992 debate cycle held the previous record, with 250 million viewers watching the three George H. W.

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Chuck Todd on Why Donald Trump Probably Won’t Skip the Presidential Debates

September 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The longest-running show on American television is having a moment, once again. NBC's Meet the Press is beginning its new season with a formula that hasn't changed much since it debuted on Nov. 6, 1947: A moderator interviews a newsmaker, usually a politician or candidate, followed by a discussion of the top political and policy issues of the day. These days the moderator is Chuck Todd, a political wonk who got his start in politics briefly working for the 1992 presidential campaign of Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa). "Basically, I was the runner to go to the bank to deposit checks," he explained. After 15 years at National Journal's The Hotline, including six as editor in chief, the late Tim Russert recruited Todd to NBC as political director. In 2014, Todd took over Meet the Press from David Gregory after it fell to third place in the ratings. Since then, Todd and his team have brought the show back to No. 1 in the ad-friendly news demo, beating out ABC's This Week, CBS' Face the Nation and Fox News Sunday. Todd, meanwhile, still has some unfinished business, which includes completing his degree from George Washington University. Adweek: We're in the home stretch now. The presidential candidates have their late-game strategies. What's the plan for Meet the Press in these final eight weeks? Chuck Todd: The challenge is the speed with which the waves are going to come at us and the struggle to filter out what matters and what doesn't.

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Chuck Todd on Why Donald Trump Probably Won’t Skip the Presidential Debates

September 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The longest-running show on American television is having a moment, once again. NBC's Meet the Press is beginning its new season with a formula that hasn't changed much since it debuted on Nov. 6, 1947: A moderator interviews a newsmaker, usually a politician or candidate, followed by a discussion of the top political and policy issues of the day. These days the moderator is Chuck Todd, a political wonk who got his start in politics briefly working for the 1992 presidential campaign of Sen. Tom Harkin (D-Iowa). "Basically, I was the runner to go to the bank to deposit checks," he explained. After 15 years at National Journal's The Hotline, including six as editor in chief, the late Tim Russert recruited Todd to NBC as political director.

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Viceland Suffers From Low Ratings Despite Its Young Audience

August 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When Viceland launched in February, the network struck an agreement with Nielsen to keep its ratings private for six months. Shortly before that window is set to lapse, the first look at those Nielsen ratings are out, revealing that while the audience is a lot younger than that of the channel it replaced, H2, it's also a lot smaller. Viceland's average 18-49 prime-time audience in July was just 45,000, less than half of the 92,000 that H2 averaged in the demo last July, according to Nielsen ratings obtained by The Wall Street Journal . The deal that Viceland, a partnership between Vice and A+E Networks, struck with Nielsen is a common arrangement for many new networks as they try to get their bearings in the first months after launching. Nielsen will still not be publicly releasing Viceland's ratings for at least another week as part of that deal. While Viceland's audience is much smaller than H2's, it's also younger. The median viewer age dropped 17 years between July 2015 and July 2016, from 57 to 40. And Nielsen data found that the average 18-49 prime-time audience for the network's July premieres was up significantly, from 59,000 for H2 to 102,000 for Viceland. Depsite the premiere spin, those 18-49 ratings seem disappointing, especially given the buzz around Viceland. However, A+E Networks president and CEO Nancy Dubuc said she is taking a long-term view. "You have to look at what is the promise of H2 10 years from now, versus what is the promise of Viceland 10 years from now," Dubuc told the Journal. Viceland looked to shake up TV advertising by running more native ads that look like editorial and reducing ad load. The network's programming has just eight minutes of national ad time per hour and two minutes of local time. Shortly after the network launched, execs were already trying to downplay linear ratings expectations. Guy Slattery, general manager for Viceland, told Adweek in March that Viceland content is available on the website, app and VOD in addition to the linear networks, but Nielsen's numbers only reflect its linear ratings. "It's an important metric, but it only captures one piece of the multiplatform approach that we have," Slattery said. "So we didn't want to make it all about that. The headlines tend to go to Nielsen ratings, and we don't feel they're going to capture the viewing of this network, particularly among the demo that we're going after

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Why Telemundo’s Boss Is Keeping His Sights Set on the Other Football

May 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Current gig Chairman, NBCUniversal International Group and NBCU Telemundo Enterprises Previous gig President, Univision Networks Age 42 Twitter @cesarconde_ Adweek: You have a big portfolio as chairman of the NBCU International Group and Telemundo Enterprises. Where is your impact felt most? Cesar Conde: It's an incredibly fast-growing market, and we have probably the most compelling suite of products, regardless of language, that help our clients tap into this high-growth market. Historically, there's been a tremendous amount of focus on the U.S. But over the last few years we've started to build our business outside of the United States. You moved to NBCU almost three years ago, after 10 years at Univision. What's the biggest difference culturally between the two companies? What I have really enjoyed about being a part of Comcast NBCU is that we have a real mentality of running our businesses as owners, not renters. We really believe in making the investments in our businesses that will deliver long-term results

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Why Telemundo’s Boss Is Keeping His Sights Set on the Other Football

May 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Current gig Chairman, NBCUniversal International Group and NBCU Telemundo Enterprises Previous gig President, Univision Networks Age 42 Twitter @cesarconde_ Adweek: You have a big portfolio as chairman of the NBCU International Group and Telemundo Enterprises. Where is your impact felt most? Cesar Conde: It's an incredibly fast-growing market, and we have probably the most compelling suite of products, regardless of language, that help our clients tap into this high-growth market. Historically, there's been a tremendous amount of focus on the U.S. But over the last few years we've started to build our business outside of the United States. You moved to NBCU almost three years ago, after 10 years at Univision

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Ratings Plummet for NCAA Championship After Its Move to Cable

April 5, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

At the beginning of the 2016 NCAA Tournament, Turner Broadcasting president David Levy claimed the difference between broadcast and cable "is almost non existent anymore." However, despite a National Championship game that will go down as a classic—Villanova defeated North Carolina on Kris Jenkins' three-pointer as the clock expired—the NCAA title game averaged 10 million fewer viewers than last year. This was also the first year the title game aired on cable TV. Monday night's game averaged 17.8 million across TBS, TNT and truTV, down 37 percent from the 28.3 million that watched Duke beat Wisconsin last April on CBS. In terms of household rating—the metric by which sports ad sales are sold— Monday's game notched a 13.2, down 38 percent. It was the lowest-rated National Championship game ever. From now until the end of the rights deal—through 2024—CBS and TBS will alternate airing the Championships and Final Four. But attributing the steep drop to moving the game from broadcast to cable only tells part of the story. Cable networks, even those with wide carriage like TBS, still have a far smaller reach compared to their broadcast counterparts. But they can still draw a crowd.

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With Its Total Audience Measurement Delayed, Nielsen Will Share More Connected TV Data

March 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Networks will have to wait a few months longer for full access to Nielsen's new Total Audience Measurement data, but in the interim, the company is preparing to share more information about usage of connected TV devices like Roku and Apple TV. Nielsen announced today that beginning April 25, it will make brand-level data available from connected TV devices, including streaming video devices and game consoles—Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, Google Chromecast, Xbox, Sony PlayStation and Nintendo Wii—as well as enabled smart TVs. This will allow clients to track how many homes across the country own TV connected devices and which brands, and how those numbers grow over time. Clients will be able to determine how much time people spend with devices overall and link program viewing to those specific devices. The company is also creating a new metric called Total Use of Television (TUT), which adds connected TV usage to linear usage for what Nielsen calls "a complete view" of TV usage. "Our device breakout data will report how much viewing to a particular network, program, episode or telecast came from a particular device type or device brand for measured content," said Sara Erichson, evp, client solutions and audience insights.

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Little Big Shots Draws 14.8 Million Viewers, and NBC Looks to Cash In With Advertisers

March 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

NBC is used to dominating broadcast ratings on Sunday nights, but it usually only happens during football season. The network's Sunday fortunes routinely dry up once Sunday Night Football signs off for the year. But NBC felt like Christmas (or the next NFL season) came early when it looked at this Sunday night's ratings. The debut of Little Big Shots, the Steve Harvey-hosted variety show that showcases talented kids, drew 14.8 million viewers overall and a 2.8 rating in the 18-49 demographic (which translates to around 3.56 million viewers). It was NBC's most-watched regular Sunday entertainment telecast since March 13, 2005, when an episode of Law & Order: Criminal Intent attracted 15.7 million viewers. The total viewer ratings improved on the show's post-Voice debut on Tuesday, when 12.8 million viewers tuned in and it had a 2.9 rating among 18- to 49-year-olds. It marked the first time NBC has won an in-season Sunday outright among broadcast networks in the 18-49 demo with a full night of entertainment series programming since April 8, 2004 (when the lineup consisted of Dateline, a Law & Order: Criminal Intent repeat and Crossing Jordan). And while most new shows lose viewers during the hour, Little Big Shots actually gained audience in its second half, jumping from a 2.6 demo rating to a 3.1. Now, with a surprise midseason hit on its hands—one that could help NBC hold on to the coveted 18-49 demo crown for the third year in a row —NBCUniversal's ad sales team has six episodes of the series left to try and cash in with advertisers. "We still have a little bit of time to do something fun, and we're certainly going to be out there in the next week or two trying to find people in the scatter market that are interested in figuring that out," said Dan Lovinger, evp, entertainment ad sales group, NBCUniversal. "But the last thing we want to do is something hasty that isn't well thought out

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