Posts Tagged ‘people’

Simulmedia’s Investors Bet $25 Million More on Smart TV Ads (Video)

December 10, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Dave Morgan’s pitch is simple, and counter-intuitive: There’s going to be a boom in video ads – and it’s going to happen on TV. The Simulmedia CEO  doesn’t mean that the TV Industrial Complex is  going away (and  you would miss it if it did ). Instead, he predicts, advertisers and programmers are going to get savvier about the way TV ads work, and will start using the same data and mechanics that power Web ads. And since TV ads are going to be a much bigger business than Web video ads , for a quite some time, he wants his company to be in the middle of that. Morgan has been making some version of this pitch for several years now , and he admits that the future isn’t here quite yet. But investors keep betting on the thesis, and him. Simulmedia has just closed a $25 million round, led by Valiant Capital and R&R Ventures, bringing its total raised in 5 years to $58 million. Until now Simulmedia has been making money by buying leftover airtime from programmers and pay TV providers, adding in a dollop of data about who’s actually watching the stuff, and reselling it to advertisers. Now it wants to use some of the new funding to build out a platform so other people can use to do the same thing. Morgan’s idea is that networks may want to apply advanced analytics to their prime ad inventory, but won’t want outsiders like Simulmedia inserting themselves as middlemen. So he’ll sell them the tech instead. You can hear him explain his plan in his own words at the bottom of this post. But one quick detour first. I don’t usually spend time talking about the people behind the money in funding stories but I’ll make a brief exception here, because they’re interesting. So: Valiant is a hedge fund run by Chris Hansen, which normally makes big bets in late stage Web companies like Facebook, Dropbox, Pinterest and Uber; you may also have heard of Hansen because he’s the guy who nearly bought the Sacramento Kings and moved them to Seattle earlier this year. Hansen used to be an analyst at Montgomery/ Banc of America, the bank that almost took Real Media, Morgan’s first company, public, back in the first boom. And R&R Ventures is a new fund run by former Time Warner CEO Dick Parsons and media investor Ron Lauder. Earlier investors including Time Warner, Avalon Ventures, Union Square Ventures, and Allen & Co. are all back in this round as well.

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Dell Tablets at Bargain Prices

December 4, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

If you’re thinking of getting someone a new, name-brand tablet for the holidays, but blanch at spending base prices of $229, $399 or $499, Dell is hoping you’ll look its way. The computer giant, battling an industrywide slump in PC sales, is once again making a push into tablets and one of its weapons is low pricing. Dell has had little success in tablets. But it introduced this fall a family of four Android- and Windows-based slates called Venue models. I took a close look at one model, the seven-inch Venue 7, which, at $150, is the least expensive new major-label tablet I’ve seen at the standard 16-gigabyte base memory level. (There are a few year-old models, or models with less memory that cost somewhat less.) To understand how low $150 is for a name-brand, 16GB tablet, consider that the market-leading Apple iPads start at $499 for the 9.7-inch iPad Air, and $399 for the iPad Mini with a 7.9-inch Retina display. Even the latest seven-inch models from Google and Amazon, known for aggressive pricing, start at $229. In fact, mostly because they adopted better screens, the 2013 models of the iPad Mini, Google Nexus 7 and top-of-the-line seven-inch Kindle Fire actually rose in price from the 2012 models. So, what exactly do you get from a $150 name-brand tablet? The answer: You get a lower-quality device with weak battery life, which might suffice for a first-time tablet buyer with a tight budget. The Venue 7 is a relatively chunky black plastic tablet running Google’s Android operating system, that’s available via Dell’s online store. It operates over Wi-Fi only, though a cellular version is planned for next year. It cannot be ordered with more internal memory than 16GB, but it has a slot for a memory expansion card. This tablet has a big brother, the Android-powered Venue 8, with similar specs, that starts at $180, still a good price. On the plus side, I found the Dell Venue 7 to be fast enough not to be annoying. Common apps like Gmail, the Chrome browser, the Kindle reading app, Google Maps, Twitter and Facebook all worked fine for me. Videos played smoothly. But buyers of this tablet aren’t getting the latest or best technology. The processor, an Intel Atom, and the version of Android used, Jelly Bean 4.2.2, are last-generation editions, though Dell says it hopes to offer an upgrade to the latest version of Android next year

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Adult Swim Crashes a Spaceship in NYC for New Show Rick and Morty

December 2, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If you were wandering aimlessly around Manhattan last week, you probably saw lampposts with a flier showing a cheap, grainy-looking photo of a spaceship and little perforated "take one" pull tabs at the bottom telling you to go to 23rd Street and Broadway to buy a slightly used spaceship. When you got there, the perceptive among you may have noticed the spaceship, which appeared to have crashed into the ground next to the Flatiron Building, with cartoon characters Rick and Morty from the new Adult Swim show (titled, cleverly, Rick and Morty) hanging around. (Well, actually, they were statues. Morty was still inside, and Rick was on a bench taking a slug from a bottle of XXX.) The installation is pretty impressive—they even mangled some chairs that look like the furniture that sits in the public area around the building and put together foam bricks that look exactly like chunks of the tan pavement. The network's campaign for the show has been an elaborate one—there's an ad on Craigslist for the spaceship, too, as well as normal(ish) posters for the show around town. The network also posted the first 22-minute episode of the show, which premieres Monday night at 10:30 p.m., on YouTube. You can check it out below, along with the network's own time-lapse video of its spaceship assemblage. And we've got an interview with co-creator Dan Harmon here. Here's a snippet we had to cut to make the interview fit in the magazine, but is still pretty cool: "It's very much like Doctor Who and Ford Prefect in Hitchhiker's Guide, and Willy Wonka," Harmon said when we asked him why he liked crazy, antisocial characters like Rick. "They just don't have time to interface with the people around them in a way that makes anybody comfortable. I think the answer over time is that you'll come to believe that he's a real person. I think even by the end of these first 10 episodes, we've figured out that the more hours you log with this guy, he never really jumps the shark in terms of revealing that he loves all the people around him, or crying and saying 'Oh, it's so hard to be this big a prick,' but you get it, or you get that you don't get it. It made me so excited that this character could possibly live for a long time." You can check out the clip below to see how insane Rick is, or stop by the Flatiron to say hi until the end of today.

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Showrunner Dan Harmon Discusses His New Animated Series

December 2, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who Dan Harmon Age 40 New gig Creator/showrunner of Rick and Morty on Adult Swim. Also on Season 5 of Community. Old gig Creator/showrunner of Community, from which he was fired after three seasons. So how did Rick and Morty, your new animated original series, begin? Justin [Roiland , co-creator] had always been sort of playing around with these very intense, strange characters. They started off as a kind of punk rock, sneering immolation of a relationship we all grew up on, which is the one between Doc Brown and Marty McFly , and they kind of evolved from there. I think there was something about this insane, sociopathic, gruff character who keeps burping while he’s talking and this kid who keeps asking these questions, the answers to which are, “I don’t have time to answer that question.” Like everything on Adult Swim , Rick and Morty has a really distinctive look. How much input do you have into that? If somebody puts something in front of me and asks for an opinion, I’ll give them one, but I’m not the person whose eyeball one should be deferring to, especially not with Justin. If he says, “Well, I want there to be a giant testicle monster with testicles hanging off of it, and it has a vagina in the middle of it,” what I can provide is, “OK, what kind of story might make use of that? Does the testicle monster come in on page one, and what are we learning on page five?” It’s kind of dark, man. It’s from the opposite corner to Community —the character who makes everything happen is a scientist and an ingenious one, who, like a lot of smart people, is burdened with the knowledge that a lot of what you think matters doesn’t matter. He knows that there are different timelines, and that there’s a universe where Hitler won World War II, and just as many as there are where Hitler lost World War II. But the stories are specifically different from Community stories. Community starts with the idea that we are all people and part of some family, and usually the call to adventure is the insinuation that there’s a system or ideology that’s more important than people, and it causes chaos.

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HP Will Replace Verizon in Hosting HealthCare.gov Website

November 27, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

The Department of Health and Human Services is going to replace Verizon Communications Inc.’s Terremark subsidiary as its Web-hosting provider for the federal health-insurance marketplace, according to people familiar with the matter, presenting a new challenge to the rollout of the Obama administration’s signature health-care initiative. HHS won’t renew its contract with Terremark and instead awarded a new contract over the summer to Hewlett-Packard Co. to host the website, said the people. Read the rest of this post on the original site »

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While Yahoo Gave Few Details About Couric’s New Role, Here’s What a Previous Deal With Her Wanted (Memo)

November 27, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

In her flashy announcement about the hiring of television news star Katie Couric as the global anchor and “face of Yahoo News,” CEO Marissa Mayer gave the very barest of details. According to her blog post, there will be an unspecified “growing team of correspondents.” And Couric will be “shooting features for our homepage.” And she will start in early 2014. For such a big move in news, there was an amazing lack of news about exactly what Couric would do — from the what to the when to the where to the how much. Thank goodness for sources close to the situation, who note that the lack of specificity was due to the still largely undetermined solid specifics about what Couric is going to do for the millions of dollars she will be paid by Yahoo. That’s due to a lot of reasons, including the fact that Couric still has another big job. While she will no longer be a special correspondent for ABC News, which did not work out as planned on either side, that has not actually taken up a lot of her bandwidth of late. Instead, she has been working on her five-day-a-week syndicated daytime talk show, called “Katie.” While its future is unclear, it still needs to complete its second season, and that will take up a lot of Couric’s time, according to numerous sources, which Mayer was aware of. In addition, according to Yahoo sources, Couric can also do other projects, including on television, as part of the deal.

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If Sitting Is the New Smoking, Soon There May Be a Crowdfunded Gadget to Help You Stop

November 18, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

“Sitting is the new smoking” is a good slogan . There’s all sorts of scientific evidence to back it up, from the basic — your metabolism slows down, your circulation is inhibited — to the hyperbolic — according to an Australian study , an hour of sitting while watching TV cuts 22 minutes from your life span, while smoking a cigarette cuts 11 minutes. Does that get your blood going enough to stand up? Perhaps you should check out a new Indiegogo campaign for what’s probably the simplest wearable activity tracker yet: the Rise. All it does is detect its orientation and monitor motion to decide whether or not you’re sitting down. Of course, there’s a companion Rise mobile app that will ping you to get up.

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T-Mobile Finds That Giving Away Free Data Is Harder Than It Sounds

November 4, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

T-Mobile figures that by giving tablet users free data , it might turn a few of them into paying customers. But it turns out that giving away data is sometimes harder than it seems. T-Mobile’s operations — both human and computer-based — were just not set up to have a nonpaying relationship with customers. As a result, some of the company’s new tablet customers were erroneously charged $10 per month for data that was supposed to be free. T-Mobile has since corrected the problem, and plans to issue refunds to affected customers. “We had a technology glitch and a training issue that caused some people to believe [they were being charged] — and some people to be charged,” T-Mobile chief marketing officer Mike Sievert said in an interview. “That’s just not right.” T-Mobile’s plan does allow tablet buyers to bring over any new or existing tablet that’s compatible with T-Mobile’s network and get 200 megabytes of free data each month. On the iPad, for example, customers don’t even need to enter a credit card number, Sievert said.

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Workplace Equality Is Good for Business

November 4, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Long before I started work as the CEO of Apple, I became aware of a fundamental truth: People are much more willing to give of themselves when they feel that their selves are being fully recognized and embraced. At Apple, we try to make sure people understand that they don’t have to check their identity at the door. We’re committed to creating a safe and welcoming workplace for all employees, regardless of their race, gender, nationality or sexual orientation. As we see it, embracing people’s individuality is a matter of basic human dignity and civil rights. It also turns out to be great for the creativity that drives our business. We’ve found that when people feel valued for who they are, they have the comfort and confidence to do the best work of their lives. Read the rest of this post on the original site »

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VC Chamath Palihapitiya Says He Has Cracked the Code for Making Startups Grow

November 1, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

All startups want growth. They want more eyeballs, more traction, more signs that what they are doing is working. They worship at the foot of the mythical hockey stick graph. But growth is a fickle, unpredictable thing — sometimes great products die before reaching an audience. Sometimes companies find tricks to get tons of users, but after the tricks fade away, everybody leaves. You can’t count on growth. Not according to Chamath Palihapitiya. The venture capitalist, whose claim to fame was starting the growth team at Facebook, said his Social+Capital Partnership now has a crew of growth experts that it deploys to portfolio companies.

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