Posts Tagged ‘people’

Was This the Moment Larry Wilmore Lost Stephen Colbert’s Intellectual Appeal?

February 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Has Comedy Central's late-night talk lineup lost some of its intellectualism since the departures of Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert? Yes, according to quite a few viewers on Reddit, and they can tell you the exact moment they noticed the change. On Wednesday, The Nightly Show host Larry Wilmore dropped by Reddit for an AMA (Ask Me Anything) session, promoting the return of new episodes next Monday. While participants raised a wide array of topics, there was one recurring theme: Disappointment. According to several commenters, Wilmore too often falls back on vapid pop culture commentary or race relations in America for his punchlines and segment focuses, abandoning the humorous-but-heartfelt championing of science and reason that was a recurring theme for The Daily Show's Stewart and Wilmore's predecessor, Colbert. One specific clip seemed to be a rallying point for those disappointed with the tonal shift

Read More

Squarespace Celebrates Leon Bridges’ Meteoric Rise to Nominee in Grammys Ad

February 15, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It would be unfair to call the rise of Leon Bridges a Cinderella story. The talented young soul singer has worked far too hard to explain it away to miracles and magic. And yet, the arc of the first part of his career has been nothing short of miraculous and magical. A little over a year ago, Bridges was washing dishes at a Tex-Mex restaurant in Fort Worth, Texas, and playing open mics after every Tuesday shift. But tonight, he'll be under a different spotlight in Los Angeles, where he's up for best R&B album at the 58th Annual Grammy Awards . To celebrate the achievement, website design platform Squarespace and Austin, Texas-based agency Preacher have partnered with Bridges—a longtime Squarespace customer—to recreate the past year in the form of a 30-second spot that will air during the awards show. An extended version of the commercial can be seen online, with a short documentary also in the works. "It's so surreal being in that same place and having no idea I'd be here now," Bridges told Adweek. "If you would have told me I'd be playing to a crowd of thousands, I would have run the other direction, you know? I would have been like, 'No, you're lying, you're lying, you're lying.' It's pretty crazy to look at that video and reflect on how everything happens." It wasn't all that long ago that Bridges was just playing coffee shops. (Last March, he was playing to a crowd of 200 or so at a college cafe in Western Tennessee.) But things are different now: When his new tour schedule was released Friday, more than half of the shows sold out by the end of the day. The history of Bridges and Squarespace date back to his early coffee-shop days

Read More

Spike’s Upcoming ‘Caraoke Showdown’ Is Hitting the Wrong Notes With ‘Carpool Karaoke’ Creators

February 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It looks like Spike's upcoming special, Caraoke Showdown, is going to lead to a real showdown between the cable network and the team behind The Late Late Show with James Corden's Carpool Karaoke. Spike's Caraoke Showdown, which the network announced last week, is set in a car and includes a celebrity host, celeb guests and lots of singing along to tunes. In other words, the show sounds a lot like Carpool Karaoke, the popular segment on Corden's late-night CBS show that has become a viral sensation thanks to videos featuring Adele, One Direction and Justin Bieber. And that's not sitting too well with The Late Late Show's executive producers. "We're disappointed with that. We're disappointed that our idea would be taken by somebody else," said Late Late Show executive producer Ben Winston.

Read More

To Thrive in the Era of Peak TV, HBO Is Turning Subscribers Into ‘Addicts’

February 11, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Are you hooked on HBO? The network sure hopes so. As the premium service competes with an ever-growing number of broadcast, cable and digital competitors, including streaming services like Netflix, the network has developed an interesting approach to keeping subscribers coming back for more each month: turning them into "addicts," according to HBO CEO Richard Plepler. HBO has 32.3 million U.S. subscribers as of the third quarter of 2015, according to SNL Kagan. Time Warner doesn't release HBO-specific figures but said Wednesday that HBO and Cinemax added 2.7 million subscribers in 2015

Read More

How Pizza Hut Ended Up In The People V. O.J. Simpson

February 10, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The Ford Bronco was front and center during last night's episode of FX's hit miniseries The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story, which covered Simpson's efforts to flee authorities in pal Al Cowling's Bronco, setting off what became the most watched police chase in U.S. history. But another prominent brand also was on display in the show's second episode: Pizza Hut. As 95 million people are glued to their TVs watching the day-long ordeal culminate in a 2-hour police pursuit, the episode cuts to a scene in a Pizza Hut, which shows the restaurant has been so inundated with pizza orders that they have run out of their cheese supply, and are unable to make anymore pizzas. Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski's script for that episode, called "The Run of His Life," initially set the scene in a different pizza chain. "It was originally Dominos, but we ended up getting permission to use Pizza Hut," said Nina Jacobson, the show's executive producer. "The idea was that the most popular pizza places ran out of cheese." Although Pizza Hut okayed its appearance in the miniseries, the company did not provide the production team with any 1994-era logos or material. "Our production designer put that together," said Jacobson. Adweek responsive video player used on /video

Read More

Symphony Brushes Off Netflix Attacks on Its Ratings Metrics

January 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If Netflix was hoping to intimidate Symphony Advanced Media into submission when it blasted the company's data —which, for the first time, revealed how many viewers are watching Netflix's original series —it is going to have to switch to Plan B. Symphony Advanced Media told Adweek today it is standing by its metrics, which Netflix's chief content officer Ted Sarandos derided as "remarkably inaccurate data" that "doesn't reflect any sense of reality of anything that we keep track of." Despite Sarandos' scoffing, "we have confidence in our data," said Laura Bernstein, Symphony's svp of client solutions. She said that Symphony's multiplatform measurement tool, VideoPulse, also measures broadcast and cable programming, and the company's partners and clients—which include NBCUniversal, A+E Networks and Viacom—have said Symphony's numbers echo the data they receive from other ratings sources like Nielsen. "There's some variation—there's different methodologies to data collection—but for the most part, we're very in line with other published numbers and with what our clients would expect. So our methodology is where people would want it to be on the broadcast and cable, where there is a comparison, which gives us a lot of confidence in what we're seeing in the streaming originals," said Bernstein. NBC kickstarted Symphony's battle with Netflix last Wednesday, when NBCUniversal's ratings guru Alan Wurtzel shared Symphony's Netflix data with reporters during the Television Critics Association's winter press tour. Wurtzel claimed Netflix doesn't yet pose a "consistent" threat to broadcasters. To make his point, Wurtzel incorporated data from Symphony Advanced Media, which has been tracking Netflix ratings metrics for the notoriously tight-lipped streaming service with VideoPulse, the multiplatform measurement tool Symphony unveiled last September . (Symphony does that by using automatic content recognition, or ACR, software embedded on a mobile app to recognize and match a program's audio files, as well as URL matches for streamed content. The company also sends a targeted survey to its panelists twice a week, asking which platform they watched specific programs on, to determine whether a show like Quantico was viewed via Hulu, VOD, ABC.com or DVR.) Among the Symphony data that Wurtzel shared: Each episode of Marvel's Jessica Jones averaged 4.8 million viewers in the 18-49 demographic within 35 days of its November premiere. Master of None drew 3.9 million in the demo and Narcos was third with 3.2 million. Sarandos returned fire on Sunday, blasting Symphony's methodology and data. "It's a bold statement for them to make," said Bernstein of the company's response. "We've never had a conversation with Netflix, so I'm not even familiar with what they know of our methodology." And while Sarandos argued that the 18-49 demo "means nothing" to Netflix, Symphony counters that the demographic is in fact incredibly important to the industry. "It's the demo that matters to the people who are selling advertising, so I do think that makes it an important demo," she said.

Read More

Q&A: Why the Founder of NY Comic Con Is Bringing YouTube Stars to Agencies’ Backyard

October 29, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Look out New York, here comes GloZell, as well as Grace Helbig, Mamrie Hart, Joey Graceffa, iJustine and Connor Franta. The stars of social video will gather in the Big Apple this weekend for the first annual Stream Con . The three-day convention, from the people who brought Comic Con to New York, will kick off Friday at the Jacob Javits Center with an Industry Summit , followed by fan events and a "creator camp" throughout the weekend. Event producer Greg Topalian, president of LeftField Media, spoke with Adweek about the goals of Stream Con and the inspiration from its West Coast cousin. Adweek: Why did you decide to start up Stream Con? Topalian: I couldn't believe that New York City didn't have an event that was a 'con' really dedicated to the YouTube, Vine, Snapchat space. We knew the fan demand was there, but the piece that got really exciting was realizing the business behind it. The ad dollars are flowing towards digital. There are certainly plenty of conferences that talk about the digital revolution and social influencers. We felt like there was an opportunity to combine that type of content but also in a fan-friendly environment. Your events are very fan focused, so how do you tailor that experience towards the business audience? We had a lot of conversations with brands and agencies upfront to say: "What do you want? What do you actually want this to be?" What we heard over and over was, "We're not looking for the big philosophical overview. Get down in the weeds, give us case studies and introduce us to the talent." It was a lot of "We know this is big, we know this is moving, there is not a client on our roster that's not asking about this. Get us the details and connect us with the right people." There is already a major online video conference, VidCon, that takes place in Anaheim, Calif. each summer.

Read More

Time Puts Branded and Editorial Content Creation Under One Roof

August 28, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On Thursday, Time Inc. unveiled The Foundry , a content and creative collective comprising Time Inc.'s Innovation Studio, Content Solutions and Time Inc. verticals, including The Drive , a new automotive site set to launch in September. The Foundry will be headed by Mark Ford, evp of global advertising sales. The new division will eventually be set up in Time's new office at Industry City in Brooklyn. Adweek spoke with Chris Hercik, vp of Time Inc.'s Native Studio, about putting the company's Innovation Studio and Content Solutions groups under one roof and how Time's in-house studio will stand out from those of other publishers. Adweek: Why launch The Foundry?

Read More

Destination America Tries to Scare Up Viewers With a Live Exorcism

July 30, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Discovery may have gotten out of the outlandish-TV-stunts business, but its sister networks didn't get that memo. Destination America will televise what it's calling the first live exorcism in U.S. history, airing Exorcism: Live! on Oct. 30. A house, not a person, will be the subject of the exorcism, which will take place at the same suburban St. Louis home where an exorcism was performed on Roland Doe in 1949. That event inspired William Peter Blatty's 1971 novel The Exorcist and its iconic 1973 film adaptation, which starred Linda Blair. During the telecast, paranormal investigators the Tennessee Wraith Chasers from the network's Ghost Asylum, along with psychic medium Chip Coffey, "will explore each crevice of this terrifying home, from the attic to the basement, to find whatever or whomever has scared Americans to death for decades," said Destination America in a release.

Read More

NBC Dumps Trumps’ Beauty Pageants, Keeps ‘Celebrity Apprentice’

June 29, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

NBC has cut its lucrative business ties with Donald Trump following Trump's comments about the United States' relationship with Mexico during his announcement for president on June 16. "The U.S. has become a dumping ground for everybody else's problems," Trump said. "When Mexico sends its people, they're not sending their best. They're sending people that have lots of problems, and they're bringing those problems with us. They're bringing drugs. They're bringing crime. They're rapists." NBC responded with this statement: "At NBC, respect and dignity for all people are cornerstones of our values.

Read More