Posts Tagged ‘people’

The Inside Story on J&J’s Revamped Marketing Mission Under Alison Lewis

June 20, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In the brand-new and buttoned-up New Brunswick, N.J., corporate offices of Johnson & Johnson , there's a conference room whose glass doors are adorned with an aqua decal of a baby's head, plus a couch that features two decorative pillows whose pattern is a mishmash of J&J brand logos and packaging. One could easily mistake this conference room for that of any other billion-dollar conglomerate—except the relentless branding won't let you forget where you are. It's a warm day in mid-May and Alison Lewis , the first global chief marketing officer of the consumer packaged-goods giant's consumer brands, would rather be interviewed here. Her office is messy, she insists, and meeting in the impersonal space allows us to briefly focus on the interior design—specifically, the pillows. "We market everywhere," Lewis jokes. Indeed, the pillows represent an almost literal manifestation of the marketer's current mission. J&J does, actually, market everywhere—investing $1.12 billion in marketing in the U.S. alone in 2015, per Kantar Media, and an estimated $2.5 billion globally, according to reports. But how exactly the company markets everywhere has changed dramatically since Lewis joined. She has streamlined the marketing efforts of over 100 disparate brands—all of which had various marketing operations functioning simultaneously but not necessarily cohesively—into one centralized force. On top of that, Lewis says, she has been working to "globalize brands that in some cases didn't have as much scale in certain parts of the world." Top priority? The namesake, Johnson's, as well as Listerine, Neutrogena and Carefree. It's a gargantuan task—not only because of the scale of J&J's marketing but also because the consumer group's 2015 revenue of $13.5 billion was down 6.8 percent versus 2014, while first-quarter revenue this year was down another 5.8 percent. (J&J's other two businesses, pharmaceuticals and medical products, are not part of this story.) But by all accounts, Lewis, who turns 49 this month, is unphased and ready to tackle all challenges. Ask anyone to describe her and you'll get variations on a theme, and the message usually goes something like this: She's a pragmatic and inspiring leader with a bold vision who tries to empower her people (she manages over 400 employees) to deliver.

Read More

Chicken With a Beef: the Untold Story of Chick-fil-A’s Cow Campaign

June 17, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Stan Richards, founder and creative director of ad agency The Richards Group, was sitting in a routine staff meeting in 1994 when he learned his agency won the Chick-fil-A account. He didn't find out in an email. No phone call came in breaking the good news. Instead, David Salyers—then vp of national and regional marketing at Chick-fil-A—ventured from Atlanta to the agency's Dallas headquarters on a whim. Salyers arrived, unannounced, and boldly walked into the meeting. He stopped whatever conversation was taking place and shook Richards' hand. "We want you to be our new agency," he said with a smile. In that moment, Salyers made a promise to Richards that the agency said still rings true today: "We will never be your biggest client, but we will do everything we can do to be your best client." And, Richards tells Adweek, "that's exactly what they've done over all those years." The underdog chicken In the early '90s, Chick-fil-A was primarily known for being a mall-based fast-food chain, but beginning in 1994, the chain started slowly shifting its focus to freestanding units. With that shift came a new batch of competitors—big burger joints.

Read More

Turner Is Opening a Branded Content Studio With Conan O’Brien’s Team Coco

May 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Turner's upfront presentation will kick off later this morning at The Theater at Madison Square Garden, but the media company, which like NBC, holds one showcase for all of its brands, gave a peek at what it will tell ad buyers. Chief among them is the creation of its own branded content studio with Conan O'Brien's Team Coco digital and social engagement team. The Team Coco Digital Studio will be headed by Conan executive producer Jeff Ross and Steve Beslow, general manager of Team Coco Digital, with Turner's content partnership and ad sales teams. Turner says that while the content studio will be focused on digital and social platforms, it won't shy away if an advertiser wants to use it for a brand integration on Conan. TNT, which is set to debut new series Animal Kingdom in June and Good Behavior in the fall, will add three new shows for 2017.

Read More

Veep’s Matt Walsh on Real-Life Politics and Maintaining a ‘Pristine Fiction’ on the Show

May 10, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Age 51 Claim to fame Stars as press secretary Mike McLintock on HBO's Veep (Sundays, 10:30 p.m.) Base Los Angeles Twitter @mrmattwalsh Adweek: What's the first information you consume in the morning? Matt Walsh: First thing would probably be skimming emails and checking Twitter. Your Twitter bio says you were an early adopter. How'd you get started on there? My friend [comedian] Paul Scheer was a big Twitter guy back then, and he said, "You should do it." At the time, I was promoting a TV show called Players, which was short-lived, and he told me it was a smart move to communicate to your fans what you're up to. Do you use Twitter differently now versus when you joined in 2009? I do think I track news off of it more than I used to. I remember when Michael Jackson died, I pulled that off of Twitter before I saw it anywhere else. That's when I realized, "Oh wow, this is a real news ticker." I think I [tweet] less now. I just try to write something once in a while, almost like homework. Do you listen to any podcasts? You Must Remember This . That's a good one. I listen to Krista Tippett's On Being .

Read More

Orange Is the New Black Star Reveals Her Favorite ‘Guilty Pleasure’ TV Shows

April 12, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Age 26 Claim to fame Stars as Taystee on Netflix's Orange Is the New Black; currently appearing as Sofia in The Color Purple on Broadway Base New York Twitter @thedanieb Adweek: What's the first information you consume in the morning? Danielle Brooks: Most of the time, it's Twitter. It's an easy way to get the news and know what's going on in the world. There's also this newsletter called theSkimm that I read. I love it because their headlines are so up to date with my generation [laughs], and it talks about really complicated subjects but in terms that I understand. And then after that, I'll hit Instagram. Who do you follow on Instagram? I love following plus-size models like Precious Lee , Ashley Graham and Tess Holliday . I also follow a lot of pages about fitness or detoxing and healthy eating because that's kind of where I am right now with spring, summer coming [laughs]. I follow all my girls from Orange. And I love BeBeautifulLA , who posts beautiful pictures of black women showing off stretch marks or wearing full African garb or naked, but done tastefully. She also posts beautiful poems about loving yourself and your body.

Read More

FX CEO Says ‘Human Curation’ Is Still More Important Than Data

April 5, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just a month into upfront season, and the buzz around data has already become deafening. But at least one company, FX Networks, is making the case to advertisers that their upfront buys should be based on more than just audience targeting. "I think something's really getting missed in the focus on data, which is the quality of attention," FX Networks CEO John Landgraf told Adweek. "It doesn't really matter how well you can target people. You need to give them something valuable enough to really command their attention, and not only the attention to engage with your content but the advertising associated with that content." Landgraf said FX's slate—which includes shows like American Horror Story, The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story and Fargo—has value to advertisers that is "vast orders of magnitude greater than anything you can get from somebody watching 30 seconds or a minute of amateur content [online]." The CEO argued that getting a consumer to engage with a show for 30 minutes, the average time spent viewing FX's digital programming, "is way more valuable than associating a commercial with a short, disposable clip which the viewer will not remember five minutes after she sees it [on Facebook or YouTube]." "Year after year, we work really, really hard to try to make things of extraordinary value to the audience on the theory—and I think it's a valid theory—that it creates extraordinary value for advertisers," Landgraf said. "So you can have all the sophisticated data and targeting in the world, and you can put an ad in front of a specific viewer. But if you don't provide them with a piece of content they love, you can't get them to watch the commercial." It was a point the network drove home last week when it kicked off its annual upfront bowling party (now in its seventh year) at New York's Lucky Strike Manhattan by screening the riveting finale of The People v. O.J. Simpson, which airs tonight

Read More

How FX Bids for New Series Without the Big Budget of Netflix

March 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As streaming services like Netflix, Amazon and Hulu snap up original series away from linear networks, as well as lure creators with big paydays and promises of creative autonomy, their competitors have had to alter their approaches to bidding for new projects. One of those is FX, which lost out on the bidding for Aziz Ansari's comedy Master of None and the upcoming drama The Crown. Both of those shows went to Netflix after the streaming service "overwhelmed us with shock and awe levels of money and commitment," FX CEO John Landgraf told reporters in January . He also used a "Moneyball" analogy when comparing FX to Netflix, explaining, "Basically, we're competing against payrolls, if you will, a la the Oakland A's and New York Yankees, that are three or four times ours." Because he can't match Netflix dollar for dollar, Landgraf has shifted the focus of his pitches, highlighting other attributes of the network when bidding for shows. Landgraf highlights his marketing team, which has been named PromaxBDA's In-House Marketing Team of the Year for five consecutive years. "I think the talent appreciates that," he told Adweek. Landgraf also emphasizes the personal touch and attention he can give FX's shows versus Netflix, which now has 100 series in the pipeline—55 for adults, 45 for children. "Our network is more of a bespoke organization than a factory. We're at about 18 shows, and that's the most that I can personally pay attention to," said Landgraf. While he could maybe do as many as 20, "I'm at the max in terms of being able to read scripts, watch rough cuts, have a thoughtful input and dialogue." And that's important, even when the network doesn't have much creative feedback in terms of notes for producers. Landgraf said that his deal with Louis CK for Louie specified that the network wasn't able to give him notes.

Read More

Q&A: Director of The Jinx Says ‘Making a Murderer’ Left Him With a Terrible Feeling

February 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Producer-director Andrew Jarecki says he continues to follow the subject of his most celebrated project, The Jinx, but he's not sure what a follow-up might look like. The 2015 HBO true-crime docuseries concluded in stunning fashion when Robert Durst, the black sheep of a high-powered New York real-estate family, effectively confessed to a series of murders. After pleading guilty to felony gun charges this month, Durst will be transferred to Los Angeles to stand trial for the murder of Susan Berman, one of the three victims chronicled in the HBO series. Adweek caught up with Jarecki after his keynote Friday afternoon at Social Media Week in New York, where the director discussed his plans for following Durst's trial and his take on Netflix's Making a Murderer. Adweek: How much are you planning to follow Durst's trial? Are you planning a follow-up to The Jinx? Andrew Jarecki: I don't have a concrete plan, but we're always filming stuff; we're always following up on stories. We're still trying to capture things that are happening. So at least we have the option on making something if it's interesting. How do you see Durst's trial playing out? I think he'll get convicted of murdering [Susan Berman], but there's no guarantee.

Read More

Was This the Moment Larry Wilmore Lost Stephen Colbert’s Intellectual Appeal?

February 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Has Comedy Central's late-night talk lineup lost some of its intellectualism since the departures of Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert? Yes, according to quite a few viewers on Reddit, and they can tell you the exact moment they noticed the change. On Wednesday, The Nightly Show host Larry Wilmore dropped by Reddit for an AMA (Ask Me Anything) session, promoting the return of new episodes next Monday. While participants raised a wide array of topics, there was one recurring theme: Disappointment. According to several commenters, Wilmore too often falls back on vapid pop culture commentary or race relations in America for his punchlines and segment focuses, abandoning the humorous-but-heartfelt championing of science and reason that was a recurring theme for The Daily Show's Stewart and Wilmore's predecessor, Colbert. One specific clip seemed to be a rallying point for those disappointed with the tonal shift

Read More

Squarespace Celebrates Leon Bridges’ Meteoric Rise to Nominee in Grammys Ad

February 15, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It would be unfair to call the rise of Leon Bridges a Cinderella story. The talented young soul singer has worked far too hard to explain it away to miracles and magic. And yet, the arc of the first part of his career has been nothing short of miraculous and magical. A little over a year ago, Bridges was washing dishes at a Tex-Mex restaurant in Fort Worth, Texas, and playing open mics after every Tuesday shift. But tonight, he'll be under a different spotlight in Los Angeles, where he's up for best R&B album at the 58th Annual Grammy Awards . To celebrate the achievement, website design platform Squarespace and Austin, Texas-based agency Preacher have partnered with Bridges—a longtime Squarespace customer—to recreate the past year in the form of a 30-second spot that will air during the awards show. An extended version of the commercial can be seen online, with a short documentary also in the works. "It's so surreal being in that same place and having no idea I'd be here now," Bridges told Adweek. "If you would have told me I'd be playing to a crowd of thousands, I would have run the other direction, you know? I would have been like, 'No, you're lying, you're lying, you're lying.' It's pretty crazy to look at that video and reflect on how everything happens." It wasn't all that long ago that Bridges was just playing coffee shops. (Last March, he was playing to a crowd of 200 or so at a college cafe in Western Tennessee.) But things are different now: When his new tour schedule was released Friday, more than half of the shows sold out by the end of the day. The history of Bridges and Squarespace date back to his early coffee-shop days

Read More