Posts Tagged ‘online’

Klout Quietly Launches Cinch, a Companion Q&A App

September 20, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Klout really wants to make you care about your online influence. That’s in part why the company has, with little fanfare, pushed out Cinch , an iOS application that pairs questions asked by users with other “experts” on certain topics, based on their amount of knowledge of the area in question. The idea is basically leveraging the value of Klout’s flagship product, which purports to rank people in terms their influence in certain areas. I, for instance, tweet a whole bunch about Facebook and Twitter as companies, so it would make sense for a product like Cinch to pair a person’s Facebook-related questions with my answers. I can’t tell you how well Klout’s pairing abilities are, because I haven’t seen it done yet. But in The Next Web’s initial testing it seems to work well enough. The whole point, it seems, is to prove to consumers that, yes, Klout does indeed have a consumer value outside of know how “cool” you are online. As I’ve long argued, Klout’s justification as a business intelligence service seems like an easy argument; if a brand can identify the people who matter that tweet and share about a product, that brand will be able to monitor and ultimately court these high-profile users. I’m not sure how well this whole Cinch thing will go, and it seems to still be in an early testing phase, just as Klout’s “Experts” program was when it launched in a limited capacity in May. I’ll be keeping an eye on it for a wider release.

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The Hot List Poll

September 2, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Welcome to Fragmentation Nation. We’ve finally arrived, as this year’s Hot List Poll affirms. Technological opportunity has conjoined with the wandering, twerking consumer, his iPad and six-second videos in tow, to burn down those media silos for good. The hottest shows are no longer found exclusively on the tube, while the concept of “appointment TV” seems downright quaint. The most anticipated series of the year was one that got kicked off the airwaves only to be reborn on Netflix. Purveyors of the most promising innovation in digital revenue—native advertising—include print brands enjoyed by your grandpa, while the buzziest new magazines are spinoffs of cable channels. Among recent hot topics on social media—aside from Syria and Miley Cyrus—were, of all things, magazine covers, featuring a bomber from Boston, pervy pols from New York and a certain media queen’s hairdo. Yet through all this upending, some things appear reliably eternal—vampires, zombies, “reality” TV, doctors in daytime, smartasses in late night and, of course, Tina Brown

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Editor’s Letter: Heat Seekers

September 2, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Invariably, like the change of seasons or perhaps a migration of birds south, the calls start coming in May: “Have you started to work on the Hot List yet?” In covering the media business for more than two decades, I have seen media brands come and go, editorial franchises live and die, platforms launch and crater, and people rise and fall. The Hot List , however, has stood the test of time, and I’m always amazed by how it amps up our readership. It has changed over time. For the majority of its 33-year run, it focused solely on the magazine industry. Winning publishers have been known to frame and hang in their offices our Hot List , which remains iconic among magazines that compete ferociously to land there—and often complain bitterly when they fail to do so. But like the industry it celebrates, as executive editor Tony Case eloquently explains , the franchise had to evolve to stay meaningful. Now in its third year expanded to include television and digital, the list has grown to 50 categories ranging from the classic Hottest Women’s Magazine to the new Hottest in Native Advertising. Hottest TV Drama has been joined by Hottest Mobile Game and Hottest YouTube Channel. While some purists weren’t so happy with expanding the list beyond print, we remain convinced it offers a rich blend of media and, in this fully integrated world, a more relevant capture of contestants. That thinking bore fruit last year when our Hot List Poll attracted more than 1 million votes on Adweek.com. And we continue to add new layers. Drafting off the Brand Visionary award that is part of our Brand Genius franchise, this year we inaugurate the Media Visionary honor, recognizing an individual who has built career-long success through clear and disciplined professional vision. Also for the first time ever, we will host a Hot List celebration on Dec.

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New Companies Are Redefining What It Means to "Share" Online

August 23, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

A Poshmark profile Lately, I’ve heard a lot of chatter predicting the decline of Facebook as users want to be more selective about what they share online. I get that — even as an adult, there are things that I’d just rather not share with my mother or father, who are proudly on Facebook. But as the company’s last earnings call showed, Facebook isn’t slowing down anytime soon. What is happening is a shift in the way people share online, and it is driven by a handful of new mobile-centric networks. Often, these networks are not only seeing the majority of their growth occurring on mobile but they’re seeing it driven by a younger demographic with a frequency that we haven’t really seen before. People are still sharing baby/pet photos, engagement announcements, job changes, etc., on Facebook and Twitter, to some extent. But when things get a little more specific, or maybe even more personal, they are turning to companies like Snapchat, NextDoor, Avocado, Rando, etc., all of which are built around a use case that isn’t appropriate for a large open network. In case you aren’t already using these highly addictive apps, here is a breakdown of some of the most interesting ones, by use case: You want to share photos with your friends or family, but privately and/or temporarily. Think about a photo you want to share, but don’t want it to exist indefinitely on the Internet — either because it’s goofy or because it would only make sense to a close friend. Snapchat* allows you to take a picture that’s visible to the recipient for a few seconds. This type of ephemeral sharing not only lowers users’ inhibitions but also brings back some of the fun aspects of sharing that went away when your co-workers friended you on Facebook. The other unique element of Snapchat that is less frequently discussed is the reduced friction around direct communication that is driving much of its growth and stickiness. The app opens immediately to the camera and enables faster photo-taking and photo-sharing than the default camera app or any of the available photo apps. The person you share the most with is likely your partner, and not all of that sharing is interesting (i.e., “can you pick up eggs on the way home?”) or Facebook-appropriate. Companies like Avocado* are closed networks for more intimate sharing with just your partner. With Avocado, you can privately and securely share a synced calendar, shared lists (i.e., to-do lists), photos, etc., with each other, and the expectations around who are and are not in the network are clearly defined. Path , which is focused on private sharing with friends and family, is another company that would fit into this category

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The Answer to ‘What Is My Password Again?’

August 20, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

[ See post to watch video ] Sure, people know they shouldn’t use the same password for their online accounts. But the fear of forgetting a password when it’s needed leads many people right back to this bad habit. This week, I tested PasswordBox, a tool that stores account passwords—using the same level of encryption employed by the U.S. government—and automatically retrieves them whenever you open a website requiring a password. It happens seamlessly, so you don’t have to do anything other than open the website you want, as usual.

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Rising Stars of YouTube Learn to Cope With Fans, Fame

August 17, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Anthony Quintal — 14 years old and the middle son of New Hampshire insurance agents — wanted to run away from the grown-ups. The fans kept slowing him down. Anthony, a rising YouTube star, had traveled to VidCon, a conference that allowed him to meet viewers of his online diary entries face to face. There was only one problem: He had a father, a manager and a communications handler trailing him. So he took off, weaving through the crowd and running up and down escalators. “Get out your running shoes!” shouted his dad, David Quintal, as he started after him. The adult entourage caught up every time fans — mostly teenage girls — mobbed Anthony for photos and autographs. One asked him to sign a book bag

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Mobile Ad Firm Millennial Buys Jumptap

August 14, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Millennial Media Inc. struck a deal to buy rival mobile advertising service Jumptap Inc. in an deal valued at about $225 million, bulking up its market share against larger and more diversified rivals. The deal lets Millennial combine its database of more than 450 million mobile-device profiles with information gleaned from Jumptap, which boasts more than 100 million unique user profiles. Jumptap says its database includes information about users of mobile devices, including location, as well as desktop computers. Where it has both, it says it is able to let advertisers target the same consumers as they move between those different screens.

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The Many Internet-Video Options for TVs

August 14, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

[ See post to watch video ] Watching TV shows, movies and other video via the Internet on your big-screen television has become all the rage. But the proliferation of devices and methods for doing so has made the whole thing mighty confusing. Should you buy a “smart TV” to watch, say, Netflix? Or should you make an older TV “smart” by attaching a box that includes Netflix? Or should you buy an adapter and just beam Netflix wirelessly from your smartphone or tablet? And then, should you stream a movie or download it? Do you have to pay to get TV shows and movies from the Internet, or can you get them for free? There’s no one right answer for everyone, or every situation. To help sort out the choices, here’s a primer for watching Internet video on a TV, legally. This isn’t a review of any one product and it’s aimed at average, non-techie consumers. Techies reading this won’t find some of the more obscure products and methods. I’ve also chosen to omit the oldest, but most complex, method — hooking up a PC to a TV using cables. That’s so 2008. Streaming vs. Beaming vs. Downloading First, let’s sort out some confusing terms. Downloading, the method used by Apple’s iTunes, usually means you are buying or renting a show or movie individually and typically storing it on your device. Streaming, used by services like YouTube or Netflix, generally means you aren’t buying a program or film, but are watching it as it flows from the company’s servers. Beaming simply means you’re streaming the video from a smartphone, tablet or PC to the TV, usually via an adapter device plugged into the TV. But when watching Internet video on a TV, it isn’t that simple

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The Restaurant Business Is Like the News Business, Says Geoffrey Zakarian

August 9, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who

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IAC Sells Newsweek (Sans The Daily Beast) to IBT Media

August 3, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

International Business Times Media has acquired the 80-year-old news publication Newsweek from IAC, the company announced on Saturday . The deal, which is expected to close in the coming days, does not include The Daily Beast, the online news website run by Tina Brown, which merged with Newsweek in 2010, also owned by IAC. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

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