Posts Tagged ‘online’

Production Companies Can Influence TV Networks

February 18, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Good news! Fox’s kicky comedy New Girl is now on Netflix and Hulu . Bad news! If you want to catch up, it’s time to get cable. Like many of its peers, Fox has adopted the “trailing five” model for its big shows on Hulu, notably the Zooey Deschanel vehicle (past seasons of which recently debuted on Netflix). Briefly, that means that if you want to catch up on New Girl from the beginning, you need to subscribe to a cable/satellite/telco TV service in order to watch every episode—otherwise, you can only access the most recent five episodes on a nonauthenticated service (eight for The Simpsons). Neither the networks nor producers wanted to talk on the record about this, but the ideal setup is mostly gleaned from historical data. “The Turner networks, a few months ago, acknowledged that making kids’ content available to Netflix maybe hurt their ratings,” said Brian Wieser, senior research analyst with Pivotal. Yet serialized dramas frequently gain viewership with a large digital presence—Breaking Bad, for example, got a major helping hand from Netflix. But production companies and the networks aren’t always going to agree on terms for digital rights. Serial sci-fi drama Almost Human, for example, is produced by Warner Bros. Television, though it’s broadcast on Fox—WBTV only makes five episodes available at a time. Revolution—another Warner Bros. show—trails five as well. It’s hard to imagine these shows wouldn’t benefit from a greater digital presence, but the value proposition for Hulu is strong, too.

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This Real Housewives of Beverly Hills Star Is Convinced Social Media Is Ruining Our Lives

February 14, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who Brandi Glanville Age 41 Accomplishments Star of Bravo’s The Real Housewives of Beverly Hills; author (her new book, Drinking and Dating: P.S. Social Media Is Ruining Romance, will be released Feb. 11) Base Los Angeles What’s the first information you consume in the morning? I guess it would be the weather. Later, I listen to the news on the radio—always very kid-friendly news because I drive my kids to school in the mornings. We also listen to Kiss FM, Ryan Seacrest .

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Who Needs the Super Bowl? Apple Debuts Ad Online Filmed on iPhones to Commemorate Mac’s 1984 Launch (VIDEO)

February 3, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Apple launched the first Macintosh computer on Jan. 24, 1984, after grabbing the world’s attention two days earlier with its iconic Super Bowl ad directed by Ridley Scott evoking the dystopian world of George Orwell’s “1984.” Thirty years later, Apple shunned buying a spot in the Big Game — and instead, on Monday, it released... Read more

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SundanceTV President Is on the Lookout for Flawed Characters

February 3, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who

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Yada, Yada, Yada: Seinfeld Reunion in the Works

January 30, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Jerry Seinfeld on Thursday confirmed that he and Larry David are working on a one-off Seinfeld reunion and that the finished product will be released “very, very soon.” Speaking to the hosts of the Boomer & Carton show on WFAN, the comic fielded a number of queries about a Jan. 13 photo in which he and Jason Alexander were seen walking outside Tom’s Restaurant on 112th and Broadway. The diner was used for establishing shots throughout Seinfeld’s NBC run. While he wasn’t entirely forthcoming, Seinfeld did drop a few hints about what he and his old confreres have been up to. He specifically said that the filming wasn’t related to a Super Bowl spot or an episode of his Crackle series Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee . “It’s neither,” Seinfeld said. “But it’s not not those things either. It’s a secret project.” Seinfeld went on to reveal that other characters from the powerhouse sitcom were involved in the project, although he wouldn’t identify a studio or a distributor

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Insiders Say NBC Has the Best Chance at Getting the NFL’s Thursday Night Package

January 27, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The National Football League is poring over a handful of formal offers for a new Thursday night TV package, and sources with skin in the game believe the top bidder will be revealed within the next seven to 10 days. While the bids are effectively sealed, insiders say NBC has the best shot at landing the single-season showcase. Submissions from current rights holders CBS, Fox, NBC and ESPN are in hand, as is an offer from former NFL partner Turner Sports. (TNT carried a slate of eight September-October NFL games from 1990-97.) Handicappers last week said that NBC likely has the upper hand in the silent auction, given its oft-demonstrated willingness to outbid rivals for high-profile sports rights and a pressing need to repair the sucking chest wound that is its Thursday night programming lineup. “ [NBC] spent $2 billion on the NHL and another four and change on the Olympics ,” said one rival sports executive. “They outbid ESPN and Fox by $1 billion to hang onto the Olympics for another 10 years, so why wouldn’t they dig deep [for a second NFL package]?” NBC Sports is staying mum on its Thursday night prospects, but network chief Bob Greenblatt has endorsed the proposal. “We’d love to have more NFL games,” the NBC entertainment chairman said during last week’s Television Critics Association gathering. “Thursday night games might be really interesting to us.” A second night of NFL games also would go a long way toward alleviating the pressure on the Peacock’s Thursday comedy lineup, which is currently averaging a miserly 1.1 in the adults 18-49 demo. While NFL Network’s Thursday Night Football is the league’s lowest-rated package, the 2.8 it delivered this season would be nothing short of a godsend for NBC. Sources said the NFL was hoping to scare up between $750 million and $800 million for the slate, although plans to simulcast a number of the games on NFL Net are likely to drive the price down. (The addition of five TNF telecasts allowed the network to boost its affiliate fee to $1.34 per sub per month, making it the second priciest channel on the dial. Removing games would violate the terms of NFL Net’s carriage agreements.) Naturally, the NFL isn’t looking to beef up revenues at the expense of its own network. “For the foreseeable future, we’ll have 13 games,” NFL Media COO Brian Rolapp told Adweek before the start of the 2012 season. “There are no plans to put those on and take those off.” Unless Fox comes away with the new slate, expect the NFL to keep the winning bid under wraps until after the Super Bowl (Feb. 2).

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Twitter’s 2014 Strategy: The Intersection of Video and Data

January 21, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Twitter is doubling down on its second-screen pitch. The company has been meeting with agencies and brands since the beginning of the year, showing off its ad product road map in an attempt to counter Facebook’s push into video , according to industry sources who met with the social network. Several of these meetings occurred at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas a few weeks ago. “Twitter is most bullish on video and data, and the intersection of video and data,” said one agency executive who was briefed on Twitter’s 2014 strategy. Industry insiders signed non-disclosure agreements and could not reveal specifics on Twitter’s upcoming ad products. But clearly, Twitter has spent much of the past year touting its symbiotic relationship with TV. Case in point: Twitter has been promoting its ability to harness data and insights from conversations surrounding specific TV shows and then allows brands to reach those viewers. And last year, Twitter bought the social TV analytics firm Bluefin Labs to bolster such TV targeting capabilities. “They have the ability to reach people simultaneously on TV and Twitter,” the ad agency executive said. “It’s a second-screen option that’s not happening elsewhere.” Brands are convinced of Twitter’s value, and the ad spending reflects their enthusiasm. “Twitter spend will increase this year for a number of reasons, one being their embrace of television,” said David Rittenhouse, Ogilvy & Mather’s managing director. TV’s use of Twitter will evolve beyond the simple adoption of hashtags in prime time, he said. Another agency executive said that some advertisers—particularly tech brands—plan to spend five times as much on Twitter this year compared to last. “If I’m sponsoring [ESPN’s] College GameDay, I can actually take my offline [ad copy], upload it into Twitter and serve it to people after they watched the show,” the source said. “Advertisers are obsessed with it because they’re able to increase awareness. It’s an extension of their TV buying, and they’re [quintupling] Twitter budgets for it.” These are ad dollars that could be going to Facebook, this source said. Indeed, there is a debate in the ad industry about which platform is better for such TV-esque advertising. As Twitter pushes TV this year, Facebook is rolling out its broad autoplay video ad product.

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Bravo Head of Development Lara Spotts Talks About the Year Ahead

January 13, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Age 42 New gig vp, development, Bravo Old gig vp, East Coast development So how’s the new job? It’s very exciting-slash-terrifying, which I think any new opportunity should be. How are things going to change for Bravo in the coming seasons? This year our strategy should be to keep our current viewers rather than to broaden that base; to keep delivering on the brand. That’s an interesting challenge with the new scripted series coming up. Can you tell us a little about that one? We just finished shooting The Girlfriend’s Guide to Divorce ; I’m really excited about the possibility of this one. It’s about a woman named Abby who’s a best-selling self-help author who’s writing a book about love and marriage at exactly the same time it’s falling apart. What is it like to be 40 and single again and also a parent? It attacks a lot of the subjects we’ve seen in the unscripted shows. I know work is kind of drying up in the third-party production world, where you came from. Why are networks like Bravo doing more in-house production?

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The War for Control of Your Living Room

January 7, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

All right, so you’ve heard CES is about the wearable Internet this year —the gadgets you whip out at a party or over dinner or (God forbid) in the car. But back in the living room, there’s a war being waged for that much-maligned piece of furniture we all end up in front of sooner or later. Call it the Idiot Box, the Boob Tube or whatever you want—the majority of media consumption still happens in front of the television, and whether it’s gaming, movie watching, Netflix or just listening to the stereo, tech giants are fighting tooth and nail for a seat on your couch. Here’s what they’re bringing to the party. The Champion From Kabletown: Comcast What it is:

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Check-In CES: The Virtual Reality Flood

January 3, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

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