Posts Tagged ‘office’

How Droga5 London Will, and Won’t, Be Like the Mothership

August 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

BALI, Indonesia—David Kolbusz has a "No assholes" rule when it comes to judging ad awards, and it's worked out pretty well for him lately. The creative chief at Droga5 London has been judging Branded Content & Branded Entertainment for the Clio Awards here in Bali this week. And it's been an altogether pleasant experience, as the jury—which included U.S.-based judges PJ Pereira of Pereira & O'Dell, Jim Elliott of Arnold and Justine Armour of Wieden + Kennedy—has been top notch, debating the work with insight, humor and great taste. It's the second straight positive judging experience for the Canadian-born Kolbusz, who was also on the Titanium & Integrated jury, led by his old boss, Sir John Hegarty, at Cannes earlier this summer. "Awards are brilliant when you've got a good jury, and they're terrible when you've got a terrible jury," he tells Adweek over beachside beers here at the Ritz-Carlton, shortly after finishing judging by helping to choose a Grand Clio for the category. "When it's good, it's great. When it's bad, it's wretched and hurts the industry.

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This Co-Working Space Boasts Private Offices and a Fully-Stocked Resource Library

July 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Fuigo, a design-focused company founded by the brothers who helm the textile company Fortuny, recently launched an upscale co-working space. The space, located on New York’s Park Avenue South, is the only co-working facility dedicated to interior designers, allowing Fuigo to cater to their specific needs. In fact, along with the opening of the space, Fuigo launched the new tech platform that the in-house designers can use to manage their businesses. Currently, 12 designers work out of the office, but that count is expected to rise to 150 by the end of 2018. And when it does, Fuigo will have more resources in place to help them succeed. “[The Fuigo resource library] is fully staffed by a ‘resource oracle,’” said co-founder Maury Riad. “It is a critical resource for designers who are constantly in need of product samples, brochures and literature so they can efficiently complete their projects. When complete, it will have product from over 1,500 vendors.”

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Publicis Seattle Has Warmth, Local Charm and Artwork Made In-House

June 14, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Publicis Seattle is a world-class agency with enough big-name clients and award-winning work to make the home office back East more than proud. But doing great work for clients endemic to the Pacific Northwest like the Muckleshoot Indian tribe, Eddie Bauer and the Seattle Symphony means this Publicis outpost reflects the values of the region. With a well-maintained roof garden, living logo and murals paying homage to Seattle, the office is a welcoming and familiar environment. Above all, though, the aim was to be inviting and warm from the moment the doors open. “There’s nothing more boring than a standard entryway,” said brand and business development senior manager Nelson Fortier. “The idea of the foyer was to create a mosaic of sorts that could tie into the shapes and colors of the brand cubbies located around the back walls of the lobby.”

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Check Out Gayle King’s Colorful, Down-to-Earth Home Away From Home at CBS

April 25, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Since CBS This Morning debuted in 2012, it's enjoyed steady gains for the network in the daypart. It's the fastest-growing network morning show, in fact, averaging 1 million more viewers than when it launched. That success has much to do with the warm and cheerful presence of co-host Gayle King, who, in addition to her CBS digs, keeps an office up New York's 57th Street in the Hearst Tower, where she serves as editor at large of BFF Oprah Winfrey's O, The Oprah Magazine. She has filled her CBS workspace (pictured here) with her favorite things: a painting she got in Telluride, Colo., photos of her children, a signed copy of the play Hamilton. Mostly, though, the domain, just like King herself, is traditional and down to earth. "I'm not a contemporary, modern girl—chrome, silver, glass," she said.

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For This Brooklyn Nine-Nine Star, Social Media Is Like Smoking

October 6, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Age 37 Claim to fame Stars as Gina on Brooklyn Nine-Nine (Sundays, 8:30 p.m. on Fox) Base Los Angeles Twitter @chelseaperetti Adweek: How addicted are you to social media? Chelsea Peretti: I've said on record, I'm waiting for some sort of charismatic leader to take me away from technology. But until that time, I do feel pretty powerless. I did a reading vacation with my boyfriend [ Key & Peele 's Jordan Peele] where we were just going to read books. I turned my phone off in the morning, and I think I went 40 minutes before I had to turn it back on. I was like, "I need to research something!" How often are you on social media during a given day? It's probably 70 percent [of the day]. I used to smoke cigarettes; anytime you're a little bored, you step outside and have a cigarette. Social media is like that. Any time there's any feeling of lacking in your life, you pop open some Web community for fulfillment

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Film Review: ‘Office’

September 24, 2015  |  Variety  |  No Comments

With his flair for elaborate choreography and sinuous camerawork, it was only a matter of time before that Hong Kong genre mixmaster Johnnie To got around to directing a full-blown musical.

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Trump Will ‘Absolutely Not’ Be Back on Celebrity Apprentice

August 13, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On the 17th and final day of the Television Critics Association's summer press tour panels, NBC Entertainment chairman Robert Greenblatt summarized this tour's recurring themes. "Too many shows, not enough monetization, fractured audience, Netflix doesn't report ratings, what did Nielsen do this time?" he said. "And how do we find the next big comedy? In a nutshell, that's sort of what keeps me up at night." NBC, which publicly parted ways with Donald Trump in June, said it will not broadcast a new version of Celebrity Apprentice this season, but the show will return in 2016 "with a new host," Greenblatt said. Whoever that is will need to "make noise and be a big personality," he added. The network is "almost done" selling off its interest in the Miss USA Pageant, according to Greenblatt, who summarized the current relationship with Trump: "At the moment, we're sort of separated." However, he wouldn't say Trump is "banned" from the network, given that he "might be the leader of the free world." If Trump isn't elected president, could he return as Celebrity Apprentice host? "Absolutely not," said Greenblatt. Comedy Struggles and Thursday Night Of course, there's a little more than that weighing on the network boss as he looks ahead to fall. Even though NBC was the No. 1 network last season among adults ages 18 to 49 for the second year in a row, its trouble spots remain the same as when Greenblatt last met with reporters in January —comedies and its Thursday night lineup. "The fall is sort of a clean start for all of us, which I'm happy about," said Greenblatt. "We've been in a difficult transition in the last couple years," Greenblatt said, with the departure of 30 Rock, The Office and Parks and Recreation

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Ad of the Day: Cable Companies Are Playground Bullies in Hilarious Ads for Sling TV

July 24, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Everyone knows cable companies can be total bullies, but pointing it out can still make for some pretty funny ads. SlingTV, the small-bundle Internet TV offering from Dish, is out with its first national ad campaign—from agency Camp + King and Prettybird directors Tim & Eric—casting "Old TV" as a bunch of mean-spirited kids extorting adults with playground tactics like wet willies. There's even a bratty service rep character that—given the slew of horror stories about, say, Comcast —doesn't really have to stretch the truth to evoke a striking sense of tragicomedy. She has a smug, hovering Bill Lumbergh wannabe of a supervisor—also pretty credible, and in a sense, a kind of nice, sympathetic nod to a certain class of worker bee. Maybe she's not really awful, she's just playing along to keep her job. The 60-second centerpiece is the most effective, though the 30-second spinoffs include some eyebrow-raising moments, like when a cable bully tries to "milk" money out of a defiant prospect (the deviants among you can probably guess how). There's also a question of whether the casting flirts with a sort of body shaming, reinforcing stereotypes by front-loading larger body types for the bullies. But it makes sure to feature skinny jerks, too. Regardless, while SlingTV doesn't require contracts, it does require a broadband connection, in case you were worried you wouldn't get to deal with a telecom company at all. CREDITS Client: SlingTV Agency: Camp + King Chief Creative Office/Partner: Roger Camp Chief Executive Officer/Partner: Jamie King Creative Director/Art Director: Rikesh Lal Creative Director/Copywriter: Jesse Dillow Creative Director/Copywriter: Paul Sincoff Art Director: Chris Nash Director of Content Production: David Verhoef Producer: DP Odishoo Brand Director: Dana Rabb Brand Manager: Nicole Nowak Director of Strategy: Shannon Williams Brand Strategist: Jose Higuera Production: Prettybird Director: Tim & Eric Executive Producer: Ali Brown Post Production/Editorial: No6 Editor: Kyle Brown Executive Producer: Crissy DeSimone Producer: Kendra Desai Post Production/Finishing: Misfit Online Artist: Steven McEuen Executive Producer: Jim Vaughan Assistant: Stu Barnes Music/Composer: SOUTH Mix: One Union Recording Engineers: Joaby Deal and Andy Greenberg

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How Mad Men, by Looking Back, Changed the Future of Advertising

May 11, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

"On Stage 9, the wardrobes of the male cast members include white shirts, cuff links, tie clips and hats," Stuart Elliott wrote in his New York Times advertising column in 2006, about a then-unknown cast shooting a pilot. "The female cast members wear long skirts, slips, formidable-looking brassieres and nylon stockings." Elliott would go on to write many columns about the AMC network's Mad Men—which premiered on July 19, 2007 and which, with much fanfare, draws to a close with the series finale on May 17—and he found silver-haired ad executives to be polarized. "Half of the people I talk to from that era are very hard-core fans of the show and say that it is exactly what it was like then," Elliott, who retired from the Times in 2014 after 23 years, tells Adweek. "And half say the show was completely phony and drummed up for dramatic purposes." Whether the series got the era right or not, what cannot be denied is that it has had an immeasurable impact on this one. Here, some of the more significant ways Mad Men changed our world. It made advertising sexy In 2007, procurement departments increasingly were applying the same cost-cutting measures to ad agencies as they did to their copy paper and coffee vendors. Ad executives, priding themselves as trusted advisors, felt slighted—and it didn't help that viewers were gleefully TiVo-ing past their commercials. "The ad business," Elliott recalls, "was kind of in a funk." Enter Jon Hamm as Don Draper. Lantern jawed, crisply dressed and pomaded, he made this pronouncement in the first episode: "Advertising is based on one thing: happiness. And you know what happiness is? Happiness is the smell of a new car. It's freedom from fear. It's a billboard on the side of the road that screams reassurance that whatever you are doing is OK." Music to the ad industry's ears. Bob Jeffrey, who served as worldwide CEO of JWT when the show premiered, notes that it helped provide the industry with a pipeline of aspiring talent

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Box Office: ‘Paul Blart’ Sequel Opens to $22 Million; ‘Furious 7′ Still No. 1

April 18, 2015  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Kevin James isn’t quite as fast as Vin Diesel at the box office but he’s not entirely out of the race this weekend. Sony’s “Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2,” playing in 3,633 theaters, should open to a solid $22 million domestically. That’s slightly below the 2009 original comedy, which debuted to $31 million but still,... Read more

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