Posts Tagged ‘night’

Lady Gaga Ignites ‘SNL’ for Highest Ratings of the Season

November 18, 2013  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Auds went gaga for Lady Gaga last night, as her hosting gig helped "Saturday Night Live" match its best overnight rating since March.

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Broadway Review: ‘Richard III/Twelfth Night’

November 11, 2013  |  Variety  |  No Comments

What sounds like a gimmick — a troupe of Shakespearean actors getting into costume and makeup in full view of the audience — turns out to be a stroke of genius when executed by the all-male company from Shakespeare’s Globe in residence at Broadway’s Belasco Theater.  Toplined by Mark Rylance (“Jerusalem”), who plays the title monarch in... Read more

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Lady Gaga to Host ‘Saturday Night Live’

October 31, 2013  |  Variety  |  No Comments

The rumors are true: Lady Gaga is set to host “Saturday Night Live,” and perform as the musical guest on the latenight program’s Nov. 16 broadcast. Episode will mark Gaga’s third appearance as a musical guest on the NBC show, and first time hosting. Her gig as “SNL’s” host will arrive just days after the... Read more

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Stars Power 17th Annual Hollywood Film Awards

October 22, 2013  |  Variety  |  No Comments

“In the words of a famous countryman of mine, John Lennon, ‘All you need is love,’” said “12 Years a Slave” director Steve McQueen upon receiving his Hollywood Breakout Director Award, the first award of the night presented at the 17th Annual Hollywood Film Awards. And indeed, the ballroom at the Beverly Hilton Hotel was... Read more

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CBS Delivers With Thursday Comedy Block

October 18, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With four weeks of data on the books, CBS’ new two-hour Thursday night comedy block appears to be one of the season’s few unambiguous success stories. Anchored by The Big Bang Theory , the chuckle stack averaged a hearty 3.2 rating in the 18-49 demo, practically trebling NBC’s parallel block (1.1).

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Jimmy Fallon Taps ‘Daily Show’ Alum Josh Lieb as Producer

October 15, 2013  |  Variety  |  No Comments

There’s a changing of the guard at “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” as “Daily Show” alum Josh Lieb is stepping in as producer while longtime Fallon scribe Amy Ozols bows out. Lieb served multiple seasons on “Daily Show” as exec producer. He recently moved to Los Angeles to pursue film and primetime TV projects, until... Read more

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The Big Bang Theory Gets the Highest Ad Rates Outside of the NFL

October 14, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just as in the cosmological model that explains how the universe sprang into existence from an infinitely dense singularity, CBS’ The Big Bang Theory has grown with such explosive force that it appears to be its own ever-expanding universe. According to media buyers surveyed by Adweek, The Big Bang Theory in its seventh season now commands a staggering $326,260 per 30-second spot, topping the likes of NBC’s The Voice ($264,575 for the higher-rated Wednesday night show), ABC’s Modern Family ($257,435) and Fox’s The Simpsons ($256,963). The robust unit cost is a function of Big Bang’s monster ratings—three episodes into the fall season, Chuck Lorre’s sitcom is averaging 19.2 million viewers and a 5.6 rating in the adults 18-49 demo—and its seemingly unstoppable growth. After posting full-season highs two years running, Big Bang’s ratings are currently trending up 12 percent versus the 2012-13 campaign. Check out the comprehensive price list for the 2013-14 broadcast season here. While the NFL commands the highest unit cost of any TV property—Fox’s roster of eight late national NFC games fetches a jaw-dropping $595,000 per :30, while each unit in NBC’s Sunday Night Football franchise is worth around $570,000 a throw—the general entertainment programs enjoy a longer run: 35 weeks when lower-priced repeats are factored in. Among the Big Four broadcast nets, CBS earns the biggest average premiums for its freshman series. The Crazy Ones , the new Tuesday 9 p.m. anchor starring Robin Williams as an idiosyncratic ad agency boss, boasts an average unit cost of $175,200—the highest rate for any new comedy. The defending ratings champ also earns top dollar for Big Bang lead-out The Millers ($122,390), Lorre’s latest multicamera sitcom Mom ($138,575) and the ratings-challenged serialized thriller Hostages ($134,420). ABC’s established reach vehicles (Modern Family, Grey’s Anatomy and, more recently, Scandal) and its popularity with younger, affluent women have allowed it to remain competitive despite ongoing ratings hiccups. But it’s a new male-skewing series that’s really leading the charge this fall, as Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. is pricing at an average rate of $169,730 per :30.

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The Big Bang Theory Gets the Highest Ad Rates Outside of the NFL

October 14, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just as in the cosmological model that explains how the universe sprang into existence from an infinitely dense singularity, CBS’ The Big Bang Theory has grown with such explosive force that it appears to be its own ever-expanding universe. According to media buyers surveyed by Adweek, The Big Bang Theory in its seventh season now commands a staggering $326,260 per 30-second spot, topping the likes of NBC’s The Voice ($264,575 for the higher-rated Wednesday night show), ABC’s Modern Family ($257,435) and Fox’s The Simpsons ($256,963). The robust unit cost is a function of Big Bang’s monster ratings—three episodes into the fall season, Chuck Lorre’s sitcom is averaging 19.2 million viewers and a 5.6 rating in the adults 18-49 demo—and its seemingly unstoppable growth. After posting full-season highs two years running, Big Bang’s ratings are currently trending up 12 percent versus the 2012-13 campaign. Check out the comprehensive price list for the 2013-14 broadcast season here. While the NFL commands the highest unit cost of any TV property—Fox’s roster of eight late national NFC games fetches a jaw-dropping $595,000 per :30, while each unit in NBC’s Sunday Night Football franchise is worth around $570,000 a throw—the general entertainment programs enjoy a longer run: 35 weeks when lower-priced repeats are factored in. Among the Big Four broadcast nets, CBS earns the biggest average premiums for its freshman series. The Crazy Ones , the new Tuesday 9 p.m. anchor starring Robin Williams as an idiosyncratic ad agency boss, boasts an average unit cost of $175,200—the highest rate for any new comedy. The defending ratings champ also earns top dollar for Big Bang lead-out The Millers ($122,390), Lorre’s latest multicamera sitcom Mom ($138,575) and the ratings-challenged serialized thriller Hostages ($134,420). ABC’s established reach vehicles (Modern Family, Grey’s Anatomy and, more recently, Scandal) and its popularity with younger, affluent women have allowed it to remain competitive despite ongoing ratings hiccups. But it’s a new male-skewing series that’s really leading the charge this fall, as Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. is pricing at an average rate of $169,730 per :30. Lead-out comedies The Goldbergs ($93,200) and Trophy Wife ($91,175) are roughly on par with the former time slot occupants, while the canceled lottery drama Lucky 7 was a bad bet at $86,355 a pop.

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Cory Monteith Tribute Lifts Glee, NBC Comedies Sink

October 11, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

A heartfelt tribute to the late Cory Monteith (Finn) helped rally legions of Gleeks, giving the Fox musical drama its highest rating in over a year. “The Quarterback,” an elegy co-written by Glee creators Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk, delivered 7.41 million viewers and a 2.8 in the adults 18-49 demo, improving upon last week’s rating (1.6) by 75 percent. The last time Glee put up bigger numbers was on Sept. 20, 2012, when the show delivered 7.46 million viewers and a 2.9 in the demo. Thursday night’s episode is the last before Glee heads off on its annual month-long hiatus. Episode 4 is slated to air on Nov. 7. If the emotional hour left fans scrambling for the Kleenex, the tears really started falling this morning when the overnights came in at NBC. After bowing to inauspicious ratings , newcomers Welcome to the Family, Sean Saves the World and The Michael J. Fox Show suffered staggering losses. Per Nielsen fast national data, Welcome to the Family dropped 27 percent to a 0.8 in the dollar demo, while Sean fell 29 percent to a 1.0. While both shows are in danger of cancelation, the Sony-produced Family will probably be the first to go. (Sean is produced in-house by Universal Television.) At 9:30 p.m., The Michael J. Fox Show fell another 29 percent to a 1.2 rating—a full 43 percent below its Sept. 26 time slot premiere. All told, the two-hour comedy block averaged a 1.1 in the demo, off the year-ago pace by one-half of a ratings point, or 31 percent. Whether it fills the 8:30 or 9 p.m. gap, look for Dan Harmon’s Community to rejoin the Thursday night fold before the leaves turn. ABC this morning was also the recipient of bad news, as its freshman genre exercise

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Hostages, We Are Men on the Ropes

October 8, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

NBC once again coasted to an effortless victory Monday night, as The Voice-Blacklist battery thumped the broadcast competition. According to Nielsen fast national data, the season’s fifth installment of The Voice delivered 14.3 million viewers and a 4.5 in the adults 18-49 demo, slipping two-tenths of a ratings point versus last week’s broadcast. At 10 p.m., The Blacklist continued its winning ways, scaring up 11.3 million total viewers and a 3.2 in the demo, down a hair from the 3.3 it delivered a week ago. This marks the third consecutive Monday night sweep for NBC, which dominated the field with an average draw of 13.3 million viewers and a 4.1 rating. The Peacock took every significant demographic, including adults 25-54 (5.1), women 18-49 (5.0) and men 18-49 (3.1). As NBC took another victory lap, things were decidedly less celebratory at CBS. The network finished last among the Big Four in the 18-49 demo (1.9) and among adults 25-54 (2.4), as its Monday night comedy block and new serialized drama Hostages demonstrated further erosion. Leading off the night at 8 p.m., the outgoing comedy How I Met Your Mother slipped 6 percent to a 2.9 rating, while freshman lead-out We Are Men fell another 10 percent to a shaky 1.8. By way of comparison, the year-ago time slot occupant, Partners, lasted six weeks before it dropped south of a 2.0 rating, whereupon CBS pulled the plug . Look for Mike & Molly to fill the 8:30 p.m

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