Posts Tagged ‘night’

NBC Will Resurrect Must-See TV by Moving This Is Us to Thursday and Reviving Will & Grace

May 14, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

NBC is making Thursday nights Must-See TV again, stocking the night with a revival of its hit sitcom Will & Grace and, in a bold scheduling move, shifting freshman phenom This Is Us to anchor the night at 9 p.m. "Our hope is to create the return of Must-See TV on Thursday," NBC Entertainment chairman...

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ABC Won’t Rest Until Everyone Knows Scandal (and TGIT) Is Finally Back Tonight

January 26, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After an excruciating eight-month hiatus for ABC, the network tonight finally gets to welcome back its TGIT lineup of Shonda Rhimes-produced Thursday-night dramas: Grey's Anatomy, Scandal (which was delayed until midseason due to Kerry Washington's pregnancy) and How to Get Away With Murder. And ABC's marketing department is making sure its viewers, who abandoned the network on Thursdays at 9 p.m. during the fall, return. ABC's fall replacement for Scandal, freshman drama Notorious, flopped immediately, averaging just a 0.9 rating in the 18-49 demographic, which is less than half of the 2.1 that Scandal brought in last season. It also drained the network's usually robust Thursday-night ad revenue.

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Without Game of Thrones, HBO Will Rely on The Young Pope and Murderous Moms

January 14, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Every spring since 2011, HBO has been able to rely on the new season of Game of Thrones and the audience surge that show provides. Last year, Season 6 helped the series become the network's most-watched series ever, with an average of 25 million viewers on all platforms. But the streak ends this spring, as the production rigors of Season 7 have required HBO to delay the show's return until summer. Instead, HBO is hoping to fill the dragon-sized gap in its spring schedule with programming from a slew of A-listers, including Reese Witherspoon, Robert De Niro, Jude Law and music industry icons Jimmy Iovine and Dr. Dre. Actors and producers from those shows met with reporters today at the Television Critics Association's winter press tour in Pasadena, Calif. Up first is the limited series The Young Pope, starring Law as the first American Pope—and yes, the youngest one—in history. The show, which premieres Jan. 15 is "more than a meme on Twitter," said HBO miniseries and Cinemax programming president Kary Antholis, referring to social media's recent obsession with the title. Law said that until he began doing press for The Young Pope a week ago, he was "completely unaware of what a meme was." Now that he has seen a sampling of the Young Pope memes, "I love them.

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Why CBS Is Airing Its First Saturday Drama Series in 13 Years

January 13, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For decades, Saturday was an essential component of each broadcast network's prime-time schedule, but in recent years the networks have thrown in the towel on the night, which has the week's lowest HUT (homes using television) levels. That includes CBS, which for years has programmed two hours of drama repeats—called Crimetime Saturday—and newsmagazine 48 Hours to fill the evening. But this winter, CBS is doing something it hasn't attempted in 13 years: airing an original drama, Ransom, on Saturdays. The series, about a crisis and hostage negotiator who tackles kidnappings and ransom cases, is a Canada-France co-production, from independent studio eOne, and cost CBS a fraction of what the network usually spends on its dramas. "We're always looking for opportunities to improve the numbers on the schedule," said CBS Entertainment president Glenn Geller. "Crimetime does just fine, but we had a unique opportunity with Ransom, because it was an international production, and we said, let's see what we can do on Saturday nights." Traditionally, "The night is the last priority for most networks as you're setting your schedule," said Kelly Kahl, senior evp of CBS Primetime. While CBS has used Saturdays to burn off remaining episodes of canceled shows like Made in Jersey and Three Rivers, the network hasn't scheduled dramas on Saturday since the 2003-04 season, when Hack (starring David Morse and Andre Braugher) and The District (with Craig T. Nelson) aired on the night. More recently, CBS tried airing a comedy on Saturday, programming the David Spade sitcom Rules of Engagement there in 2011. But the network abandoned the experiment after just a few weeks, shifting Rules to Thursday to replace the DOA sitcom How to Be a Gentleman (which was burned off on, yes, Saturdays). Because CBS audiences responded to freshman fall series Bull, Kevin Can Wait, Man With a Plan and The Great Indoors, "we're sitting pretty good the other nights of the week," said Kahl. "Every night of the week counts, and as you look at your weekly numbers, an hour on Saturday counts exactly the same as an hour on Monday. So we saw an opportunity there for us." CBS gave Ransom a Sunday launch on Jan. 1, where it drew 6.7 million viewers, and a 0.8 rating in the adults 18-49 demo. Last week, in its first regular airing on Saturday at 8 p.m

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The Trump Phenomenon Delivered Massive Ratings for Cable News Throughout

November 9, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Say what you want about the outcome, but the 2016 presidential election cycle was unlike any the news media has ever experienced. As you might expect, cable news reaped significant benefits from the volatility of the race in the form of huge ratings. Fox News beat CNN in total audience on election night 2016 during the full coverage block, from 7 p.m. to 3 a.m. Per Nielsen data, FNC delivered 12.2 million viewers compared to CNN's 11.2 million. Fox News' viewership climbed on an hourly basis through midnight, while both CNN and MSNBC peaked at around 10 p.m. The ratings trends seem make sense considering now President-elect Donald Trump gained momentum as the night went on, while Hillary Clinton steadily lost steam. Fox News also beat CNN in the all-important 2-3 a.m. time period, when the race was called. CNN did make some ratings history in prime time, as 13.3 million total viewers tuned into the network's Election Night in America coverage

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The Trump Phenomenon Delivered Massive Ratings for Cable News Throughout

November 9, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Say what you want about the outcome, but the 2016 presidential election cycle was unlike any the news media has ever experienced. As you might expect, cable news reaped significant benefits from the volatility of the race in the form of huge ratings. Fox News beat CNN in total audience on election night 2016 during the full coverage block, from 7 p.m. to 3 a.m. Per Nielsen data, FNC delivered 12.2 million viewers compared to CNN's 11.2 million. Fox News' viewership climbed on an hourly basis through midnight, while both CNN and MSNBC peaked at around 10 p.m. The ratings trends seem make sense considering now President-elect Donald Trump gained momentum as the night went on, while Hillary Clinton steadily lost steam. Fox News also beat CNN in the all-important 2-3 a.m. time period, when the race was called.

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Donald Trump Turned Stephen Colbert’s Showtime Election Comedy Special Into a Wake

November 9, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In August, when Showtime Networks CEO and president David Nevins made the "half announcement" that Stephen Colbert would host a live, comedy special for Showtime on election night, the exec told reporters, "that sounds fun, right?" It did, but what transpired during Tuesday night's Showtime special—prophetically titled, Stephen Colbert's Live Election Night Democracy's Series Finale: Who's Going To Clean Up This Sh*t?—was anything but fun, as news came rolling in throughout the program of Donald Trump's surprising voting surge. The crowd for Monday night's live Late Show with Stephen Colbert had been treated to an energetic, hilarious live Election Eve show, with a surprise appearance from Jon Stewart . But just 24 hours later, the energy in the Ed Sullivan Theater for the Showtime special (Colbert jumped to CBS' sister network for the night as election coverage had preempted the Late Show) couldn't have been more different. Forced to turn off their cell phones more for than 30 minutes before the show began, the audience had no idea of what election news had transpired, and loudly gasped as Colbert shared the latest results on-air. "Right now the election is too close to call and too terrifying to contemplate," Colbert said. "This one is a nail-biter, and a passport-grabber." And while he opened up with a humorous animated package (below) about how President Obama had driven Trump to run for president, it quickly became clear that Colbert's Showtime special wasn't a comedy show, but a wake. Each new revelation that Trump had taken battleground states like Florida, Ohio and North Carolina sucked the energy out of the pro-Hillary Clinton audience. "I'm not sure if it's a comedy show at this point

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Agency London in New York Literally Set Up a Work Space Inside the Metropolitan Opera House

September 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Many ad agency executives' jobs take them to unique locations. But very few have had the opportunity to work in an environment quite like this one. London in New York, a new shop founded by partners and co-creative directors Carolyn London and Michael Vadino, launched this month. And unlike every other agency in New York, its principals recently worked from inside the Metropolitan Opera House at Lincoln Center. During the time London spent working alongside the Met's in-house marketing team, a rack of elaborate costumes sat down the hall from their work space and a morning trip to the basement cafeteria for a cup of coffee might have involved sharing a table with members of the Bolshoi ballet, costumed soldiers, child opera singers or the star of La Boheme. This relationship was a first for the 133-year-old Met, which recently launched a campaign to promote a new season that opens on Sept. 26.

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The People v. O.J. Simpson, Game of Thrones Dominate 2016 Emmys

September 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On the night before the 2016-17 TV season began, the television industry honored its very best shows and actors at the 68th Emmy Awards—and the broadcast networks once again found themselves dominated by cable and streaming networks. For three hours on ABC, a series of broadcast stars strode onstage at the Microsoft Theater, and more often than not, presented Emmys to HBO's Game of Thrones, FX's The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story, and Amazon's Transparent. Of 27 Emmy awards, just four went to broadcast outlets: Kate McKinnon won for supporting actress in a comedy (NBC's Saturday Night Live), NBC's The Voice was named best reality competition program, Regina King won for supporting actress in a limited series (ABC's American Crime) and Fox's Grease: Live was honored for directing in a variety special. HBO and FX dominated the evening, with 6 Emmys apiece, led by Game of Thrones and The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story. Netflix and Amazon were also well represented (with 3 and 2 awards, respectively), and even BBC America snuck in, as Orphan Black's Tatiana Maslany, who read her acceptance speech via smartphone, was a surprise pick for best actress in a drama series

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The Return of ‘Stephen Colbert’ and Jon Stewart Gives Late Show a Ratings Boost

July 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

CBS had hoped that its decision to broadcast The Late Show with Stephen Colbert live during both political convention weeks would give the show the boost in ratings and buzz that it's been seeking for months. Last night, the return of two longtime Comedy Central pals—his Colbert Report alter ego and Jon Stewart—helped the program do just that. Monday night's Late Show live broadcast beat its competitors in the 56 overnight metered markets with a 2.1 rating, its best overnight household rating since May 10. That put it ahead of The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon (2.0) and Jimmy Kimmel Live (1.5). Late Show, which is broadcasting live during both political conventions, averaged a 0.5 rating in the 18-49 demo in the 25 local people meter markets. It was the show's best rating since Feb. 15, but still wasn't enough to overtake The Tonight Show, which had a 0.7. These ratings will be updated later today when national ratings are available. Season to date, Late Show is averaging a 0.62 in 18-49, with 2.8 million viewers overall, which is well behind The Tonight Show (a 1.01 rating and 3.7 million total viewers). Kimmel is in third place with a 0.56 demo rating and 2.4 million total viewers

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