Posts Tagged ‘networks’

NBC Celebrates NYC and Its Own Past in First Ads for Jimmy Fallon’s Tonight Show

January 7, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The Tonight Show is moving from one smug cultural petri dish to another, thanks to Jimmy Fallon, who will be taking the show back to NYC when he replaces Jay Leno next month. To commemorate this historic shift into reverse gear, NBC has released a print ad of a snappily dressed Fallon walking the edge of a high-rise building in Manhattan. I have to say, it's weird to see Fallon looking directly into a camera without corpsing like an amateur. It's a pretty standard ad for this sort of thing, but it gets the point across and the skyline is cool, which is all they need to prompt New Yorkers to pat themselves on the back about yet another thing. Below is the first TV promo, which features all the past hosts of the show—even, for literally half a second, Conan O'Brien.

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Wild Card Weekend Puts Up Huge Ratings

January 6, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In a season of white-knuckle finishes, the NFL’s Wild Card Weekend did not disappoint, as three of the four playoff games came down to the wire. And as the nail-biting moments piled up, the ratings soared. According to Nielsen, NBC’s Saturday doubleheader averaged a record 30.8 million viewers and a 17.6 household rating, marking the highest deliveries since the NFL expanded the playoff field back in 1990. The early game established the tone for the entire weekend. Spearheaded by a frenzied Andrew Luck, who threw four touchdown passes and scooped up a fumble for a ground score , the Colts’ improbable 28-point comeback over the Chiefs was the second largest in league history. With an average delivery of 27.6 million viewers (up 17 percent from last year’s Houston-Cincinnati broadcast), the Colts-Chiefs battle now stands as the second most-watched early Saturday Wild Card game ever

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Adweek.com’s Top 10 Television Stories of 2013

January 3, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Here are the 10 most-read TV stories published on Adweek.com in 2013: 10. A la Carte Is the Worst Idea Anyone Has Ever Had By Sam Thielman During earnings calls among the major networks last week, there was a consistent refrain: a la carte may be in the news, but it's not on the horizon. Most CEOs simply took questions about a la carte the same way they take all dumb questions: as invitations to discuss their networks' innate superiority to the competition. Read the full story. 9. Orange Is the New Black Star Taylor Schilling Talks About Her Favorite Scene By Lisa Granatstein "My favorite part about Piper is the variety of things I've been able to do with her

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‘Duck Dynasty’: A&E Ends Phil Robertson Suspension; Aims to Turn Controversy into Teachable Moment

December 27, 2013  |  Variety  |  No Comments

A+E Networks has maneuvered its way out of the “Duck Dynasty” controversy surrounding its top-rated show by consulting with the key advocacy groups in a position to raise the loudest ruckus over its response to the inflammatory remarks made by Phil Robertson about homosexuals and African-Americans, among other topics. A&E said Friday it would lift the suspension... Read more

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Lawmakers Use Impending Blackout of Miami-Buffalo Game to Push Blackout Law

December 20, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Latching onto the impending TV blackout of the Bills-Dolphins game in Buffalo on Sunday, Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) and Rep. Brian Higgins (D-NY) took the opportunity to push for legislation to stop sports blackouts for good. Even though Sunday’s game would be only the second blackout of the 2013 NFL season—the first was the Week 13 Bengals-Chargers game in San Diego—past years have seen more than a dozen blackouts. That said, the issue tends to disproportionately impact fans in the two aforementioned markets. Going back to the final month of the 2012 NFL campaign, Buffalo and San Diego have accounted for five of the the league’s eight blacked-out telecasts. An estimated 15,000 seats at Buffalo’s Ralph Wilson Stadium remain unsold. “This blackout is exhibit A for why we need to abolish the antitrust exemptions for teams that black out games,”

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Netflix Doesn’t Have the Market Cornered on Binge TV: Zombies + Walter White Help AMC Win the Fall VOD War

December 20, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Everyone* gets the concept of binge-viewing. And most people now associate binge-viewing with Netflix, in part because Netflix wants us to associate binge-viewing with Netflix . But if you want to gorge on episode after episode of your favorite show, you don’t necessarily have to pony up for Netflix, or for an iTunes season pass: Lots of you can watch lots of your favorite shows on your pay-TV provider’s on-demand system, for free. And many of you do. Time spent watching video on demand is increasing , even as traditional TV-watching flattens out and/or declines. Newest data point: In September and October, AMC Networks generated more video-on-demand orders than any other network, according to pay-TV tracker Rentrak. Which makes sense, because in September, AMC wrapped up its final season of “Breaking Bad,” and in October, AMC kicked off a new season of “The Walking Dead.” The breakdown: AMC generated 15 million VOD orders in September — about five percent of all VOD orders that month — and 10 million in October. VOD critics/boosters, like Time Warner CEO Jeff Bewkes , argue that those numbers could be much bigger if pay-TV providers did a better job of promoting the stuff they have, and making their TV guides and interfaces less awful. And that’s very believable

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Netflix Doesn’t Have the Market Cornered on Binge TV: Zombies + Walter White Help AMC Win the Fall VOD War

December 20, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Everyone* gets the concept of binge-viewing. And most people now associate binge-viewing with Netflix, in part because Netflix wants us to associate binge-viewing with Netflix . But if you want to gorge on episode after episode of your favorite show, you don’t necessarily have to pony up for Netflix, or for an iTunes season pass: Lots of you can watch lots of your favorite shows on your pay-TV provider’s on-demand system, for free. And many of you do. Time spent watching video on demand is increasing , even as traditional TV-watching flattens out and/or declines. Newest data point: In September and October, AMC Networks generated more video-on-demand orders than any other network, according to pay-TV tracker Rentrak.

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NBC Leads C3 Ratings Race as Networks Bed Down for Winter Break

December 19, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With a third of the 2013-14 TV season on the books and the networks having settled down for a long winter’s nap, NBC retains a comfortable lead over the rest of the broadcast pack. According to Nielsen C3 ratings for the period spanning Sept. 23-Dec. 1 (the most up-to-date figures available, given the three weeks required to process the data), NBC is averaging a 3.0 in the adults 18-49 demo, putting it a few lengths ahead of Fox (2.2), CBS (2.1) and ABC (2.0). The currency against which nearly all ratings guarantees are made, C3 is a blend of average live commercial ratings and three days of time-shifted deliveries. Boosted by Sunday Night Football, The Voice and its new hit drama series The Blacklist, NBC thus far has enjoyed remarkable consistency in a season otherwise marked by ratings eccentricities. Compared to the first 10 weeks of the 2012-13 campaign, when NBC carved out a similarly large lead over its rivals, the Peacock is flat in C3. The network is also getting the most mileage out of the metric, improving three-tenths of a ratings point from an average 2.7 live-plus-same-day delivery. Runner-up Fox is also the season’s most improved network, growing 10 percent in the demo from its year-ago 2.0 C3 average. Upon conversion to the currency, Fox also tacked two-tenths of a ratings point onto its 10-week L+SD average. Both CBS and ABC slipped one-tenth of a point from their respective year-ago averages. On a percentile basis, the CW laid claim to the biggest increase to date, improving 17 percent to a 0.7 rating. While veteran series are doing much of the heavy lifting, each broadcast net can lay claim to at least one new hit. Chief among these is The Blacklist, which through its first nine episodes is averaging a 3.5 in the dollar demo—a jump of four-tenths of a point versus its L+SD average

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Duck Dynasty Will Most Likely Continue—but What a Mess for A&E [Updated]

December 19, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The rule of thumb goes something like this: When a TV network executive says something stupid, bigoted or controversial, viewers will occasionally consider boycotting the channel. But when a star says something stupid, bigoted or controversial

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Broadcast Spend Drops 18 Percent to $4.18 Billion in Q3

December 16, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The sugar rush of last year’s Summer Olympics and political spend has given way to the inevitable crash, as third-quarter advertising expenditures were down significantly from Q3 2012. According to a new report from Kantar Media, overall Q3 TV spend dipped 6 percent to $17.2 billion on unfavorable comparisons to the year-ago July-September period. Broadcast TV took the biggest hit, dropping 18 percent to $4.18 billion. Predictably, spot TV also took its lumps, falling 15 percent to $3.8 billion. “Comparisons against Q3 of 2012 are skewed by last year’s record-breaking Summer Olympics and political campaign ad spending, which artificially boosted the market,” said Jon Swallen, chief research officer at Kantar Media North America. Swallen added that the London Games and the presidential and local elections injected “more than $1 billion in incremental money into the TV marketplace.” Of course, the broadcast marketplace as a whole did not directly benefit from the huge cash infusion provided by the Olympics. NBC booked north of $1 billion in ad sales for the 2012 London Summer Games, a haul it sweetened with another $300 million in affiliate and digital revenue. (While the Winter Olympics don’t have quite the impact of the Summer Games, NBC expects to make a profit on Sochi, for which it paid a $775 million rights fee. Earlier this fall, NBC Sports evp of sales and marketing Seth Winter said NBC already secured a record $800 million in Sochi sales.) As Swallen notes, advertising driven by the Olympics, other sports programming and elections accounts for a steadily increasing share of TV sales . Whereas these categories accounted for $12.8 billion, or 19 percent, of the estimated $68.4 billion in overall TV sales in 2008, last year’s incremental spend accounted for 22 percent of the total TV take—a hearty $16.8 billion wedge of the $75.2 billion pie. National cable networks aren’t nearly as in thrall to the Olympics and political eddies. Per Kantar, cable was up 5 percent to $6.24 billion. Pricing increases and an ongoing inflation of hourly ad time contributed to this increase.

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