Posts Tagged ‘networks’

Aereo vs. Broadcast TV: The Case That Could Change Everything

April 21, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On April 22, attorneys for Aereo and the broadcast TV networks will face off before the Supreme Court in American Broadcasting Companies Inc. v. Aereo . The closely watched case could change the course of broadcast television and determine the future of the emerging over-the-top video marketplace. With so much on the line, Aereo—fighting to stay in business—and the broadcasters that want to shut it down have enlisted the services of a couple of big-name Washington attorneys with deep ties to the high court. The Supreme Court decision , which could come in late summer, will end two years of legal battles that began just prior to Aereo’s launch in New York. What Aereo calls a technology that gets it around the copyright law to deliver over-the-air TV stations on the Internet broadcasters call a legal gimmick and a clear violation of copyright. As Aereo rolled out in other cities, broadcasters sued. Aereo won in New York and Boston but lost in Utah. When broadcasters petioned the Supreme Court last October to hear the case, the response of Aereo, knowing it faced an endless series of expensive lawsuits, was: Bring it on. The question before the court Whether a company “publicly performs a copyrighted television program when it retransmits a broadcast of that program to thousands of paid subscribers over the Internet.” What’s at stake for Aereo? If it loses, Barry Diller, Aereo’s financial backer, has said the startup is toast

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Aereo vs. Broadcast TV: The Case That Could Change Everything

April 21, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On April 22, attorneys for Aereo and the broadcast TV networks will face off before the Supreme Court in American Broadcasting Companies Inc. v. Aereo . The closely watched case could change the course of broadcast television and determine the future of the emerging over-the-top video marketplace. With so much on the line, Aereo—fighting to stay in business—and the broadcasters that want to shut it down have enlisted the services of a couple of big-name Washington attorneys with deep ties to the high court. The Supreme Court decision , which could come in late summer, will end two years of legal battles that began just prior to Aereo’s launch in New York. What Aereo calls a technology that gets it around the copyright law to deliver over-the-air TV stations on the Internet broadcasters call a legal gimmick and a clear violation of copyright. As Aereo rolled out in other cities, broadcasters sued. Aereo won in New York and Boston but lost in Utah. When broadcasters petioned the Supreme Court last October to hear the case, the response of Aereo, knowing it faced an endless series of expensive lawsuits, was: Bring it on. The question before the court Whether a company “publicly performs a copyrighted television program when it retransmits a broadcast of that program to thousands of paid subscribers over the Internet.” What’s at stake for Aereo? If it loses, Barry Diller, Aereo’s financial backer, has said the startup is toast

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Meet Watch Awards Production Judge Fred Seibert

April 18, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

What’s the key to having a viral hit? Make sure that it’s funny, topical, sexy—and a little off-kilter, media mogul Fred Seibert explains. "I think that weird mostly works because it is novel," Seibert said. "It is a new twist on every day life that through contrast draws attention to itself." The founder and executive producer of independent animation studio Frederator Studios has worn many hats in the entertainment industry. Before his current job, he was the first creative director for MTV . He

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Mad Men Star Vincent Kartheiser Stays Away From Social Media

April 18, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who Vincent Kartheiser Age 34 Accomplishments Stars as Pete Campbell on AMC’s Mad Men (Season 7 airs Sundays at 10/9c); voices Marsh Merriweather on the Fox animated series High School USA! Base Los Angeles What’s the first information you consume in the morning? Email. My computer is usually close at hand. If I’m going to work, the first media I probably consume is music in my car. How do you listen to music? I do Spotify. Every once in a while I’ll do satellite radio comedy channels, too. There’s a bunch of them—Comedy Central, Raw Dog, and Jamie Foxx has one. How do you get your news?

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Fargo Earns Solid Sampling in Debut

April 16, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The series premiere of FX’s adaptation of Fargo drew some decent sampling Tuesday night, scaring up 2.65 million viewers and a 0.8 in the 18-49 demo. While the 10 p.m. deliveries weren’t exactly world-beaters—recent dramas The Americans drew 3.22 million viewers and a 1.2 in the dollar demo in its January 2013 premiere, while The Bridge last July bowed to 3.04 million viewers and a 0.9 rating—the network guarantees against multiplay deliveries. As such, the more germane number is the cume: 4.15 million viewers and a 1.4 in the demo. Time-shifted viewing will only serve to boost Fargo’s premiere deliveries. Naturally, the relevant data will align with the C3 currency , which blends average commercial minutes in each live telecast with three days of playback. Because FX has been adept at encouraging viewers to catch up via on-demand platforms in which the trick functionality has been disabled (in other words, there’s no way to zap through the commercials), its conversion from live-plus-three-day data to C3 is particularly favorable. In other words, not only are people watching the content, but they’re being exposed to the paid marketing messages that keep TV afloat. “We are incredibly proud of the towering creative achievement by [writer/producer] Noah Hawley and everyone involved with Fargo,” said John Landgraf, CEO of FX Networks and FX Productions, by way of announcing the premiere deliveries. (A tip of the hat to Landgraf for not trying to cram a stray “oh, geez!” or “you betcha!” into the canned quote.) Landgraf went on to extol the talents of the cast, which features Billy Bob Thornton as a whimsical sociopath, Martin Freeman as a henpecked insurance salesman, and newcomer Allison Tolman as a folksy, but dedicated, young police officer. “This is truly one of the best shows we’ve ever had on the network,” Landgraf said. “We’re thrilled with the initial viewership last night and really excited for audiences to see the rest of the miniseries.” The ratings rolled in shortly after FX officially announced the renewal of The Americans for a third season

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7 Stats That Spell Trouble for TV and Online Video Ads

April 14, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Nothing beats video advertising for engaging consumers, forging emotional connections and building brand awareness. Unfortunately, the two major delivery vehicles for video ads face enormous, intractable problems due to attrition, cultural changes and flat-out fraud. Any advertiser that sinks significant money into TV and online video ads faces an uncomfortable truth: That a significant and growing percentage of dollars spent in those mediums is wasted. “ The New Reality of Digital Video Advertising ,”

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BuzzFeed Inks TV Tune-In Pacts with Bravo, IFC

April 10, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

List-driven social news site BuzzFeed announced deals with NBCUniversal’s Bravo and AMC Networks’ IFC, under which the cablers are promoting BuzzFeed content on-air and online (and vice versa). The networks are the first two partners for BuzzFeed’s Social Tune In Program, which will let advertisers “leverage their content on BuzzFeed on their own platforms,” according to New... Read more

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How Do You Find the Right Scream for an Angry Goat in Your Ad?

April 8, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Getting the right scream for an angry goat in a Doritos crowdsourced Super Bowl spot was just part of the job for the musicians at Tunewelders, a 5-year-old music production company in Atlanta. The shop specializes in customized music and sounds for brands and programming, ranging from goofy to solemn, such as a patriotic melody underlining NFL players reading the Declaration of Independence—another promo Tunewelders did for this year’s Super Bowl audience. Guitarist Ben Holst is co-founder, producer and creative director of Tunewelders. He and co-founder Jeremy Gilbertson work with Jason Shannon and Vic Stafford to tap into what he calls the backlash against “overcomputed, overprocessed” music and the movement toward “organic and authentic” sounds coming from real instruments. What makes your music studio different from the legion of others out there? We do emotional Americana using instruments like acoustic guitars and Hammond organs. We play and record real instruments, and we do music by hand. How is the role of music and sound changing in ads and branded content? Music has traditionally been treated as an afterthought in making an ad.

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NBCU’s Steve Burke Declares Victory

April 7, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

“We don’t want you to think that we were trying to hide or conceal anything but we didn’t want to talk about what we were doing. [We wanted] instead [to] talk about what we had done,” said NBCUniversal CEO Steve Burke in his introductory remarks to press this afternoon at a lunch at 30 Rock. The executive touted the company’s performance in recent months, saying that, for the first time in 10 years, NBC was going to be on the top of the broadcast heap at the end of the season. Burke allowed that the Olympics had helped boost performance, but noted that “even four years ago in Vancouver, we weren’t at the levels we are now.” Per Nielsen live-plus-same-day data, NBC's coverage of the 2014 Sochi Winter Games averaged

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Dead Air: Zombies or No Zombies, Sunday Broadcast Ratings Continue to Slump

April 7, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Now that The Walking Dead has staggered off for its customary six-month between-seasons break, broadcasters last night may have hoped to regain some of their lost potency in the Sunday 9 p.m. time slot. Didn’t happen. According to Nielsen fast national data, the three regularly-scheduled broadcast series that had previously gone head-to-head with AMC’s zombie apocaypse drama were either down or flat versus last week. On ABC, the supernatural drama Resurrection averaged 7.54 million viewers and a series-low 2.1 in the dollar demo, down 13 percent from a week ago. Fox’s Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey was flat with a 1.5 rating, while NBC’s midseason drama Believe continued to drop, notching a series-low 1.0 in the demo. (Since bowing to a torrid 3.8 rating on March 9, Resurrection has lost 45 percent of its target demo.) Instead of a new episode of The Good Wife , CBS at 9 p.m. aired the second hour of the 49th Academy of Country Music Awards. The middle third of the broadcast delivered 14.7 million viewers and a 3.6 rating, doubling the 1.8 rating served up by last week’s installment of The Good Wife.

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