Posts Tagged ‘networks’

Fox Won’t Even Burn Off Its Last Episodes of Us & Them

June 10, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

That's a wrap for Us & Them, a remake of popular British sitcom Gavin & Stacey. A Fox spokesperson confirmed that the show had been canceled for some time, though Vulture broke the news of its total absence from the airwaves earlier . (It was widely known that the show's already-skimpy 13-episode order was being downgraded to six.) The disclosure that the network won't even air the completed episodes of the show is suprising, given that the series previously had been slated to air this summer. In the wake of Fox chief Kevin Reilly's departure, there are plenty of questions about the slate that the executive had backed before leaving. Fox is writing upfront deals but ad buyers have described the process as more difficult than if Reilly was still in charge. Gavin & Stacey had managed to wrangle some good notices from critics for its likable leads—Jason Ritter and Alexis Bledel—and goofy supporting cast. So, in that context, the cancellation is surprising. But now there's a prefab comedy out there from Sony just waiting for somebody to pick it up. Hey, DCNF participants, remember how you were all talking about how you'd be investing a ton in premium content this year?

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Networks Pour Cash Into Summer Programming

June 3, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The broadcast season is over. Permanently. That’s not to say that a bunch of new series won’t be back in the fall, but you no longer have to watch reruns and reality shows during the summer—and you may not have to ever again. Ratings for postseason unscripted shows have been dismal in recent weeks, and major players from Fox to Syfy have been dumping cash into summertime viewing after witnessing the successes of series like CBS’ Under the Dome (returning for a second season June 30 at 10 p.m.). Of course, it’s not all going to be great, so we watched as many pilots as we could get our hands on, making our picks for original series into the summer (and beyond) across genres, networks and media platforms. Enjoy. Garfunkel & Oates

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Networks Are Writing Discounted C7 Deals, But Not Everyone’s Biting

June 2, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Even with Kevin Reilly out at the News Corp broadcaster and ratings declines from an aging American Idol, Fox has managed to score a serious deal: GroupM, arguably the biggest media agency network, is buying C7 guarantees. GroupM didn't respond immediately to requests for comment, but one of the networks is said to be dangling a 3 percent pricing discount in front of agencies that will agree to C7 guarantees. It hasn't even been that long since the networks started selling C3—the shift to C7 is something buyers have long resisted, given the length of time it takes to process the data and the need for immediate returns on ads such as movie trailers. With C7 guarantees, you may see that your ad was delivered, but if your ad was delivered on unskippable VOD on Tuesday and your movie opened on Friday, it's probably not a great feeling to shell out cash for that delivery. And GroupM does represent Paramount Pictures among many, many other big-name clients including Unilever and AT&T.

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Networks Will Write Discounted C7 Deals, but Not Everyone’s Biting

June 2, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Even with Kevin Reilly out at the News Corp broadcaster and ratings declines from an aging American Idol, Fox has managed to score a serious deal: GroupM, arguably the biggest media agency network, is buying C7 guarantees. GroupM didn't respond immediately to requests for comment, but one of the networks is said to be dangling a 3 percent pricing discount in front of agencies that will agree to C7 guarantees. It hasn't even been that long since the networks started selling C3—the shift to C7 is something buyers have long resisted, given the length of time it takes to process the data and the need for immediate returns on ads such as movie trailers. With C7 guarantees, you may see that your ad was delivered, but if your ad was delivered on unskippable VOD on Tuesday and your movie opened on Friday, it's probably not a great feeling to shell out cash for that delivery. And GroupM does represent Paramount Pictures among many other big-name clients including Unilever and AT&T. It's a gamble (and probably not a gamble the media agency is taking on all of its clients), but it's one head buyer Rino Scanzoni has said he's comfortable with as recently as three weeks ago. "It all comes down to economics," Scanzoni told the Wall Street Journal . "Clients are obviously getting that audience when people play back their programs post-three days; if they’re not fast-forwarding the commercials, that exposure exists. Ultimately I do see the business going onto a C7 metric because as we try to drive the business to a cross-platform metric, you probably need a longer time frame than the C3 window to optimize that. We will eventually be going there. It’s a matter of working out the economics initially to make the transition one that’s acceptable to both sides." So let the message go forth: The economics are acceptable at the moment

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Nobody Wants to Marry Harry

May 28, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It's not like you could have made a second season of gag reality show I Wanna Marry Harry, anyway, but Fox execs who might have been considering the option aren't going to get the chance with these ratings. The show dipped a painful 48 percent in its second frame (partly due to the loss of lead-in American Idol, which also isn't exactly setting the world on fire , and also probably because the show has been a hate magnet ) after a none-too-spectacular first outing last week. The show is about a guy who pretends to be Prince Harry in order to trick some not-terribly-bright girls into dating him.

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Why AMC Wants You to Watch the Whole First Episode of Halt & Catch Fire Early on Tumblr

May 20, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If AMC's corporate strategy has embraced a single ethos over the last few years, it's that more people watching is better, period. So it's probably not a surprise that the network elected to release the premiere episode of its new drama Halt & Catch Fire, a period show about the competitive 1980's personal computing scene, on Tumblr

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5 Time Slot Brawls to Watch This Fall

May 19, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With radically altered prime-time lineups at ABC and Fox, football on Thursday at CBS, and an NBC slate without its Thursday comedy block, the season is shaping up to be anything but the same old story. The only network that didn’t really change much was The CW, which is sticking with its costumes-and-cheekbones formula. Here are our matchups to keep an eye on:

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Turner Upfront Slate Tries for Younger Viewers, Even Male/Female Split

May 14, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Without Steve Koonin at the helm for the first time in years, Turner is giving the floor to head of programming Michael Wright this morning. The networks are shifting focus, representatives for the network group said in prepared statements, in pursuit of younger audiences and a more balanced male-female demo skew. (At the moment Turner's flagship networks, TNT and TBS, skew female). Also front and center during the presentation now that former ad sales chief David Levy runs the whole shooting match: Donna Speciale, president of Turner Broadcasting ad sales. "The integration of television, online and mobile content is accelerating, and with that, we are all moving quickly to evolve our advertising strategies," Speciale said in the release. It's an acknowledgement that many in the cable world are making, while broadcast tends to push back ("Programmatic buying is the gluten of advertising," Jimmy Kimmel told the ABC upfront audience. "Everyone is talking about it but nobody knows what it is.") Wright has been at the company more than a dozen years, but it's only now that he's getting to make his mark. It's an interesting one, too: remember TNT's Frank Darabont-helmed Mob City last year? The noir theme seems to be one that Wright and company like, because right at the top of the docket is Public Morals, a new scripted series set in the 1960s from writer, director, producer and star Ed Burns. If that's the network's offering for men, Proof seems to be its offering for women: Jennifer Beals, Matthew Modine and Joe Morton (late of well-liked Syfy dramedy Eureka) star in a show about a surgeon (Beals) and a terminally ill billionaire (Modine) who team up to figure out if there's an afterlife. In development, the network has projects from Vince Vaughn, Donnie Wahlberg—who seems to be everywhere these days—and The Blacklist's Joe Carnahan, among others. On TBS, the new offerings that are pretty clearly male/female include Angie Tribeca, from Parks and Rec/The Office star and writer Rashida Jones, an Airplane!-esque spoof of the police procedurals that still dominate much of basic cable. For the ladies, there's Buzzy's, an ensemble workplace comedy about a barbershop, produced by Will & Grace creators David Kohan and Max Mutchnick, which will star Ashley Tisdale. The other Turner news this week has to do with dynamic advertising: the cable group has struck a deal with Comcast for complete current and previous seasons of long-running shows on the networks—"stacking rights," as players in that market have been calling it

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Upfront Uproar: NBC Guts Thursday Night Comedies, Shifts The Backlist

May 11, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

On the verge of winning its first seasonal ratings crown in a decade, NBC still has a lot of work to do if it’s going to repeat its title run in 2014-15. To that end, the Peacock has made sweeping changes in its prime time lineup, most notably on Thursday nights. Once the strongest block on the tube, NBC’s Must-See TV roster has been anything but since ER flatlined back in 2009. For years, the network’s signature brand of brainy, uproarious comedies (Parks and Recreation, 30 Rock, Community, et al) failed to draw a crowd, and last season’s bid to go broad with family-oriented sitcoms (The Michael J. Fox Show, Sean Saves the World ) belly flopped as well. Rather than adhere to its longstanding two-hour comedy block, NBC is getting more focused.

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Jamie Horowitz Jumps From ESPN to NBC’s Today Show

May 7, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The worst-kept secret in morning news officially was let out of the bag today, as NBC confirmed that veteran ESPN producer Jamie Horowitz will take the helm at the Today show. Horowitz on Dec. 1 will assume the role of svp and general manager of Today, where he’ll oversee all four hours of the weekday program and the 30 Rock concert series. He will also be

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