Posts Tagged ‘networks’

Why Advertisers Are So Eager for This Year’s Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade

November 25, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As broadcast TV ratings continue to plummet this fall, advertisers have fewer and fewer reliable options outside of sports when it comes to making ad buys for the holiday season. But tomorrow, they get a Thanksgiving treat: the robust audience tuning in for NBC's broadcast of the 89th annual Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. The telecast, which NBC will air live from 9 a.m. to noon (and repeat at 2 p.m., after the National Dog Show), has become one of the year's best bets for advertisers, especially given that Thanksgiving night/Black Friday sales begin just hours later. Last year's parade averaged 22.6 million viewers, and its 6.2 rating among adults ages 18 to 49 topped every other nonsports prime-time telecast on the broadcast networks last fall.

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Presidential Hopefuls Ask for Equal Airtime After Donald Trump’s SNL Gig

November 16, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

This was inevitable. Following Donald Trump's hosting stint on the Nov. 7 episode of Saturday Night Live, three Republican presidential hopefuls have requested equal time on NBC stations. According to the FCC's "equal time" rule, broadcast and radio stations are required to offer an equivalent opportunity for candidates to appear on non-news programs. NBC tallied up Trump's airtime at 12 minutes and five seconds. Opposing candidates then had seven days following Trump's SNL episode to request that amount of time on NBC stations. And three of them have: former New York Gov

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‘Canceled’ is a Dirty Word This Fall, but Buyers Aren’t Panicking

November 9, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Each year, a few familiar touchstones mark the passage of fall: trees shedding their leaves, the end of Daylight Saving Time and the ritual cancelation of broadcast's lowest-rated new shows. Yet for the first time in more than 15 years, the networks made it to November without pulling the plug on a single new series. Several freshman shows are rating a paltry 0.6 or 0.7 in adults 18-49, but instead of cancelling them as usual, networks are keeping them on the air and reducing their 13-episode orders. Fox trimmed Minority Report's count to 10, while ABC did the same with Blood and Oil. NBC cut Truth Be Told's order to 10 and took The Player down to 9.

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3 Things to Know about Donald Trump’s SNL Hosting Gig

November 6, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Donald Trump will host Saturday Night Live this weekend for the second time, but this will be very different than his 2004 appearance, when he was a part of the NBC family as host of The Apprentice. NBC dumped Trump in June, but the GOP presidential candidate is back at 30 Rock and will take the stage live from New York on Saturday night. And not everyone's happy about it. While Trump is by far the most significant candidate to host the sketch comedy show in the midst of an active campaign, he isn't the first. Steve Forbes hosted while he was running for the Republican nomination in 1996, and Al Sharpton took his turn in 2003 while running as a Democrat. Here are some 3 things to look out for on Saturday night: 1) An FCC Rule Could Mean Headaches for NBC Affiliates A candidate cameo on SNL is par for the course, but usually it's no more than a skit, or a Weekend Update appearance, such as Hillary Clinton's turn as "Val the Bartender" on this season's premiere. But as host, Trump will be front and center throughout, and it could trigger an FCC rule regarding the amount of airtime candidates are allowed on non-news programs. The FCC's equal time rule states that broadcast and radio stations must provide an equivalent opportunity to any opposing political candidates who request it. NBC stations could be forced to fork over a significant chunk of airtime as a result. Don't be surprised to see other campaigns adding up Trump's airtime and asking for an equal amount. When Sharpton hosted during the 2004 campaign, several NBC affiliates refused to carry the episode for that reason. 2) It's Live, and Someone Might Want to Make a Statement Trump's hosting gig has angered many people, particularly some in the Hispanic community, in the wake of his degrading comments about illegal immigrants. On Thursday, a coalition of Latino advocacy groups staged a protest outside NBC's headquarters. Protester sign at small rally for #SNLDumpTrump — Tanzina Vega (@tanzinavega) November 4, 2015 The Hispanic Federation, the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA) and the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) are planning to march from Trump Tower to 30 Rock ahead of the broadcast. A Latino Rights PAC called Deport Racism is offering a $5,000 "bounty" for any audience member who disrupts the episode by yelling out "Deport racism!" or "Trump is a racist!" SNL is no stranger to controversy, and airing the show without the safety net of editing—it is live, after all—only further leads to the possibility that something unexpected might happen. It might not top Sinead O'Connor ripping up a picture of the Pope, but Trump is a combustible figure and there could be those who see an opportunity to make a statement. 3) NBC Will Do "Yuuuge" Ratings Trump has already boasted that his hosting stint will result in massive ratings for NBC, and he's probably right. As the three Republican primary debates have proved, Trump brings in viewers whether they like him or not.

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CBS Is Bringing Back Star Trek, But It Won’t Air on TV

November 2, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

CBS is bringing back Star Trek, but the new series will boldly go where no previous iteration of the show has gone before: on a digital platform. In a first for CBS, the network announced this morning that a new Star Trek series will premiere in 2017 on the broadcast network before moving exclusively to subscription-on-demand service, CBS All Access. This will be the first series that CBS is producing solely for its digital platform, which launched in 2014. CBS All Access, which runs $5.99 per month, currently includes the entire library of every Star Trek television series. CBS Studios International will distribute the series to other TV networks and digital platforms around the world. Though CBS owns the show, and original creator Gene Roddenberry had initially developed it for CBS, it aired on NBC for three years from 1966-1969. The short-lived series spawned a massive pop culture franchise, which has included 12 feature films—with a 13th, Star Trek Beyond, due next year—and multiple spin-off shows. The new series will be developed by executive producer Alex Kurtzman, who co-wrote and produced the rebooted film franchise, beginning with 2009's Star Trek and continuing with 2013's, Star Trek Into Darkness. CBS said the new show is not related to the upcoming Star Trek Beyond film and will feature new characters and settings. "We've experienced terrific growth for CBS All Access, expanding the service across affiliates and devices in a very short time," said Marc DeBevoise, evp and general manager, CBS Digital Media. "We now have an incredible opportunity to accelerate this growth with the iconic Star Trek, and its devoted and passionate fan base, as our first original series." The move to put the new Star Trek exclusively on a digital platform comes as the broadcast industry is looking for ways to bring in elusive millennial viewers who often eschew traditional television. CBS successfully launched Supergirl last week with an eye toward younger viewers. But overnight Nielsen ratings—especially among the adults 18 to 49 demographic that advertisers covet—have been down so far this season. Nielsen will begin to roll out its new Total Audience Measurement tool to count viewers across multiple platforms next month. Star Trek continues the trend of cable and broadcast networks banking on reboots or remakes of known properties that come with built-in fan bases. This season alone has seen TV versions of the films Minority Report and Limitless, as well as a revival of another decades-old TV show: The Muppets.

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New Data Shows Just How Much Advertisers Are Paying for Commercials in Late Night

October 19, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Networks and advertisers typically spend every fall focused on the new prime-time lineups. Not this year. All eyes are on late night, and with good reason. "Outside of sports, it's the strongest area of television from an ad-supported perspective," said Chris Geraci, president of national broadcast at OMD. When Jimmy Fallon took over from Jay Leno as host of NBC's Tonight Show in February 2014, his immediate success at 11:30 p.m. "rejuvenated the daypart," said Geraci. This fall, late night has been revitalized yet again, with the arrival last month of The Late Show with Stephen Colbert on CBS and The Daily Show with Trevor Noah on Comedy Central. Those two launches capped a turbulent 19-month period in which every nightly talker with the exception of ABC's Jimmy Kimmel Live welcomed a new host. As the dust settles on the latest late-night moves, advertisers find themselves with a more enticing (and younger-skewing) audience than they've had in years, and they're paying to reach them. According to SQAD NetCosts, which tracked quarterly 30-second ad prices in the adult 18-49 demo, CBS has doubled the rates The Late Show got as David Letterman was winding down his reign.

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This New Measurement Tool Shows Millennials Are Watching as Much TV as Anyone

September 22, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As the new TV season kicks off with 22 new shows debuting over the next month, networks and advertisers will begin to make sense of which series are clicking with viewers and which ones will get axed. But in the current TV marketplace of fragmented viewership, networks have been complaining that Nielsen no longer provides an adequate measurement of who's really watching their shows. "We're not getting measured accurately and were losing a lot of people," said Alan Wurtzel, NBCUniversal's president of research and media development, during an industry meeting this morning. Wurtzel estimated that 15 percent to 35 percent of viewers who watch on other platforms are not getting counted. "And it's only growing," he added. VideoPulse, which was unveiled this morning, is a new TV multiplatform measurement tool from Symphony Advanced Media looking to finally crack that code. It's a cloud-based service that captures live media usage by individuals across OTT, VOD, Web, mobile, gaming devices, DVR and linear TV. Data comes from the 15,000 users who have already signed up to be tracked; Symphony hopes to have 50,000 within the next year. The data VideoPulse has already gathered goes against the idea that millennials aren't watching TV—they just aren't watching the way previous generations did. According to traditional TV measurement from Nielsen, millennial viewing has dropped 30 percent over the past five years. But VideoPulse found that 25 percent of viewing among millennials is on DVRs and over-the-top services and happens outside the Live+7 window, not measured by Nielsen. "There has been a significant void in understanding how consumers are using nontraditional media platforms, but innovation has finally arrived in the media-measurement space," said Charles Buchwalter, president and CEO of Symphony Advanced Media. Buchwalter says the product will "track the cross-media, cross-platform behavior of consumers in the fastest growing mode of TV and video viewing, allowing the market to extend beyond the current industry-accepted norm of Live viewing plus seven days ratings." The product—which is available immediately for advertisers, agencies and media companies—is already undergoing beta testing by NBC, Viacom, Warner Bros. Media Research and A+E Networks. "Our industry has been disadvantaged by legacy-measurement approaches that have failed to evolve with consumers' increasing use of media platforms," said Liz Huszarik, evp, Warner Bros. Media Research & Insights. "We are hopeful that by working with Symphony Advanced Media's VideoPulse that we can capture an accurate picture of consumers' total TV/video usage across platforms and devices with a transparency that's been missing from other vendors." VideoPulse also includes data from streaming services—most notably Netflix—which so far hasn't been divulged

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A+E Networks Shake-up Leads to a New History Chief

September 18, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Dirk Hoogstra is history at History. The evp and gm of History and H2, who has been overseeing the networks since June 2013, is out, effective immediately. His replacement is FYI and LMN president Jana Bennett, who has been named president and gm of History, A+E Networks announced today. Bennett, who joined the company in 2013, will now oversee all strategic planning, programming and marketing for History and H2. "Jana has one of the strongest track records building and shaping global brands—first at the BBC and now here at A+E Networks," said Nancy Dubuc, president and CEO, A+E Networks, in a statement. "She joined our company with the mandate to take our networks into new and exciting places and what she's done with FYI in such a short amount of time is remarkable. History and H2 will greatly benefit from her creative prowess and steady stewardship." "I have a passion for History—where we've come from and where we are headed," said Bennett in a statement. As head of FYI—a July 2014 rebranding of what was Bio—Bennett drove the network to double-digit ratings growth

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With Just One New Fall Series, The CW Takes the Biggest Risk of Any Network

September 18, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The CW concludes Adweek’s week-long fall TV preview today not with a bang, but with a whimper. While the other four broadcasters are rolling out at least five new series apiece over the next two months, The CW has only one freshman show on its schedule. That’s what happens when you only program 10 hours a week and renew your entire lineup from the previous fall , as the network did earlier this year. While the network still isn’t a factor in the broadcast battle for adults ages 18-49, it picked up significant momentum last year with The Flash, its most-watched series ever in the 18-49 demo, and Jane the Virgin, the first CW show to win a Peabody and Golden Globe. That sets a pretty high bar for Crazy Ex-Girlfriend.

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These New and Returning Fall TV Shows Are Getting the Most Buzz on Twitter

September 17, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

A new TV season kicks off next week with 22 different shows set to debut on the broadcast networks. But it's a cable show that's generating the most buzz on Twitter. Among new series that will debut this fall, Twitter notes that FX's next iteration of its hugely popular American Horror Story franchise, Hotel, is generating the most chatter—no doubt buoyed by the addition of Lady Gaga to this year's ensemble. Also on the list is a show that has already premiered, The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. A trio of broadcast newcomers rounded out the top five: Fox's Scream Queens, NBC's Heroes Reborn and CBS' Supergirl.

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