Posts Tagged ‘network’

NBC Has Officially Sold All of Its $4.5 Million Super Bowl Spots

January 28, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It's official, and not a moment too soon: NBC has sold every single spot in the Super Bowl, although some pre-game spots are still up for grabs, according to Seth Winter, evp of ad sales for NBCUniversal's news and sports groups. The timing isn't typical, by the way—Fox sold out the game in December last year. But NBC was driving a hard bargain: The network asked for $4.5 million a pop this year, and it was also dealing with a marketplace where several key players, notably automakers , are simply sitting this one out. Rumor has it, too, that NBC asked for an additional investment from advertisers coming into the Super Bowl for the first time—a placement of additional millions with the company's large suite of cable networks. At any rate, the network is publicly very happy with the outcome. "We came through with flying colors," Winter said to reporters by conference call today, though he admitted that it "hadn't been the easiest exercise" in his career. And ultimately, the network is using some of the airtime to play up its own shows across that same portfolio, so there are multiple ways to win here. One of the promo spots in the Big Game is going to fashion-and-fame network E! for its new show The Royals.

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TV Review: TruTV’s ‘Breaking Greenville’

January 27, 2015  |  Variety  |  No Comments

As TruTV continues redefining its niche, “Breaking Greenville” seems to offer an example of the network’s direction, for good and (mostly) ill. Basically a reality sitcom – think “The Mary Tyler Moore Show’s” newsroom setting meets “Green Acres” – the show centers on dueling newscasts in the tiny TV market of Greenville, Miss. (No. 190... Read more

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Nascar Legends Richard Petty and Dale Earnhardt Loom Large in New Campaign

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Stock car legends Richard "The King" Petty and the late Dale "The Intimidator" Earnhardt won the most Nascar season titles with seven apiece—putting them in rarified air among the many drivers who have raced over the decades. Richard "The King" Petty provides voiceover in new spots. | Photo: Tom Pennington/Nascar via Getty Images Nascar and title sponsor Comcast will tap into their regal racing legacy to position the renamed Nascar Xfinity Series as the proving ground where future legends are born. Four out of five Nascar fans are also NFL fans. Comcast will use the spotlight around this weekend's Super Bowl XLIX to promote the kickoff of the 2015 Xfinity series Feb. 21 at Daytona International Speedway. Comcast and Nascar gave Adweek an exclusive look at the new campaign by Goodby, Silverstein & Partners, San Francisco. The new spot will break Jan. 30 during NBC Sports Network's coverage of Nascar Hall of Fame ceremonies, then re-air on NFL Network's Super Bowl Saturday Night and NBC's coverage of the NFL Honors show the night before the Big Game. Called "Out There," the first 30-second spot features a voiceover by the folksy Petty. The King notes there's some aggressive young Xfinity driver out there, right now, who could "intimidate The Intimidator."

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Adweek Debuts Redesign With Its First Super Bowl Issue Today

January 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As in football, sticking with a playbook in publishing for too long can have dire consequences. If your routes become obvious, or stale, your competition will either do an end run around you or simply tear your head off at the line of scrimmage. So with this, our Super Bowl Issue, Adweek introduces a cover-to-cover revamp. (Might as well launch a redesign during advertising's biggest week of the year, right?) A staff-wide effort led by the enterprise and energy of editor Lisa Granatstein and executive creative director Nick Mrozowski, what you see here is a culmination of a makeover that actually began in bits and pieces some six months ago. Here, you will find that the department formerly known as Front is, in a nod to our buying and selling friends in the video space, restyled as Upfront. Trending Topics is rechristened as Trending, while Voice, Data Points, Mover (formerly First Mover) and Facetime each gets a new look. The unifying mission of it all is to deliver the same great news analysis in a fresh, dynamic and informative package. We've also added two weekly departments

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FX Wants to be the ‘Best’ Channel on TV, Not the Highest-Rated One

January 21, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

FX is now the No. 4 cable network when it comes to 18- to 49-year-olds, up from sixth place a year ago. While many networks in its position would be gunning for the top spot, FX Networks CEO John Landgraf made an unusual proclamation at the Television Critics Association's winter press tour: He'd rather be the "best" channel on TV instead of the top-rated one. "Obviously we want as many people as possible to watch our shows, we want them to be as highly rated as possible, but there's quite a range [of ratings], and we can support that range," said Landgraf, referring to some of FX's critically acclaimed, but lower-rated, shows like Louie and The Americans. "We're not really a channel that's trying to be the highest-rated channel in television. We're trying as hard as we possibly can to be the best channel in television, whatever that means. If we weren't therefore supporting shows that would help us get there, just because [they weren't among the highest-rated], we'd be idiots." That said, Landgraf's patience does have its limits: The Bridge's declining Season 2 audience forced him to cancel the drama last fall, despite a creative resurgence. Landgraf noted that more than 1,700 original seasons of television aired in 2014, up from the 1,300-plus in 2013. Per FX's research department, 353 scripted original series aired last year on U.S. broadcast, basic and premium cable, and on over the top platforms like Netflix. The number of original scripted series on basic and pay cable in prime-time doubled in the past five years, from 91 to 180. "The amount of competition is just literally insane," Landgraf said. However, "the reality is there's a whole lot of shows on television that are probably relevant to almost no one." FX thinks it's solved the relevancy problem with shows that seem to be resonating. The network's research department compiled all 2014's Top 10 lists from TV critics, and found that FX lagged behind only HBO on the highest representation of shows by network (250 for HBO and 213 for FX, with AMC in third place with 74). At this point, Landgraf said, "the race for the best in TV is really only a competition between two channels: [HBO and FX.]" He also discussed FX's decision to experiment with shows that stray from typical episode and season lengths, explaining that while The Sopranos and other dramas changed the game, eventually their formats "started to feel like a box in some cases

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A Humbled Fox Seeks to Change Its Fortunes

January 18, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The last time Fox was at the Television Critics Association's winter press tour, then-chief Kevin Reilly declared that pilot season was dead (which topped my list of the most ridiculous statements network presidents said last year). Well, Reilly stepped down last May, pilot season is alive and well, and a

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Resurgent NBC Sets Sights on Two Remaining Weak Spots: Thursdays and Comedies

January 18, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When NBC entertainment chairman Robert Greenblatt started at the network in 2011, things looked bleak. NBC has now clawed its way back to first place in the 18-49 demographic, thanks to Sunday Night Football, The Voice and hits like The Blacklist. But the entertainment chairman knows his network still has two big problems to fix if it wants to remain on top: addressing the network's comedy woes and restoring luster to Thursday night, which has gone from Must-See TV to Barely Seen TV. "I think we're moving along nicely, but it's far from a done deal. We're in much better shape than we were two years ago, but we still have a lot of row to hoe," Greenblatt said at the Television Critics Association's winter press tour this week. At the top of his list: shoring up his comedy development. "We are really challenged by the comedy brand that we're trying to build on this network," said Greenblatt, who is going away from single-camera sitcoms (he already gave the network's single-cam Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt to Netflix, to the delight of creator Tina Fey ) and back to multi-cam shows, including One Big Happy, debuting March 17. "Some of the best shows on NBC in its history were multi-cams." While the refocus on comedy will take months or years to bear fruit, NBC is taking more immediate steps to save Thursdays, which "used to be the big night of television for NBC," Greenblatt said. "It's an important night for a lot of reasons, not the least of which is it is a great, desirable night for advertising." But the network has languished on the night with low-rated, quickly canceled comedies like The Michael J. Fox Show and this season's Bad Judge and A to Z . "Putting comedies we love there and having them fail started to feel like the definition of insanity," said entertainment president Jennifer Salke. Instead, Greenblatt is making a bold but perilous gamble, moving his biggest scripted series, The Blacklist, to Thursdays at 9 p.m., where it will face-off against Scandal on ABC beginning Feb. 5. "It's a risky but necessary move for us to make," said Greeblatt, who pointed to other big Thursday-night shifts that seemed potentially disastrous at the time but paid off, including Fox's The Simpsons, CBS' CSI and most recently Grey's Anatomy, which laid the groundwork for ABC's TGIT. "The only way to really reinvigorate that night is to jumpstart it with something like The Blacklist," Greenblatt said. "If you don't start that move at some point, you'll never get there." Looking beyond those two giant holes, Greenblatt announced several projects with big-name stars. He has given a 13-episode series order to Telenovela, a Soapdish -like comedy about a diva star (played by Eva Longoria, who will also produce) that is set behind the scenes of a telenovela production. And Jennifer Lopez will star in a new drama, Shades of Blue, about a single mom and detective who is recruited to work undercover for FBI's anti-corruption task force.

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From USA to Bravo, NBCUniversal’s Cable Channels are in Transition

January 18, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As NBC proper continues to build momentum—attracting more viewers ages 18 to 49 than any other broadcast network—many of parent

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NBC Says It Will be a ‘Huge Disappointment’ if Super Bowl Doesn’t Break Ratings Records

January 16, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

What is NBC shooting for when it comes to this year's big game? Oh, just 115 million people. It's expected that each Super Bowl

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Nickelodeon Says It’s Growing Audience by Adding Sports to the Mix

January 14, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It's been four months since kid-focused cable network Nickelodeon took the leap of dedicating a 2-hour prime-time block to sports programming. So how is it working out? Pretty well, say the numbers. Since its September debut, NickSports has grown the Wednesday block by 15 percent with boys ages 6 to 11 and 19 percent with kids (girls and boys combined) in the same age group. "We are hitting all the touch points everyone wants to be involved in," says Keith Dawkins, svp and general manager for Nicktoons, TeenNick and NickJr. Michael Strahan hosted 2014's Kids' Choice Sports Awards, drawing 2.7 million viewers. The idea for the programming block, airing from 9 to 11 p.m. ET,

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