Posts Tagged ‘network’

We Play Matchmaker for Merger Candidates AMC, Scripps and IPG

May 27, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Who's next? The recent spree of mergers and acquisitions doesn't appear to be at an end, at least not to the market-watchers at Barron's, who listed Mad Men and Walking Dead network group AMC as a ripe target for investors looking to get into the television game, along with Scripps Networks Interactive, the conglomerate behind the Food Network, HGTV and the Cooking channel. Also a potential bargain: Interpublic Group (IPG). One of the reasons each of these companies looks like a strong candidate for acquisition is its ratio of enterprise value—the amount of capital it would take to purchase the company—to earnings. Buy low, sell high. So who might be interested in each of these organizations? AMC : The network group has gone from strength to strength over the last few years with hits like Mad Men, The Walking Dead and Breaking Bad bringing in revenue not merely from subscribers and advertisers, but from third-party streaming service Netflix, which pays for season-old content of the flagship network's signature serialized dramas. That, in turn, drives live viewership. Morgan Stanley has been cautious about the company, emphasizing the inherent risk in buying a bunch of new shows (which Netflix has indeed done), but its long-term prospects, Morgan Stanley says, are good. Our pick for a nice boyfriend : Netflix, definitely. With a staggering market cap , It's a company with plenty of capital looking for a more stable revenue stream as competition heats up around its core businesses. It's not actually that much bigger than Netflix in revenue terms ($4.37 billion last year vs. $1.59 billion), but its main concern at the moment is off-the-books commitments that could be mitigated by the acquisition of a high-profile content company.

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Watch: Seth Rogen and Snoop Dogg Recap ‘Game of Thrones’

May 26, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Seth Rogen and Snoop Dogg have at least two interests in common: the blunt they shared in their recent video and “Game of Thrones.” “Neighbors” star Rogen stopped by Snoop Dogg’s GGN Network (a.k.a Double G News Network) to recap the HBO fantasy drama with Snoop’s YouTube persona, Nemo Hoes. Warning: the recap, featured above,... Read more

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Here Is Your First Look at the New Disney Channel Logo

May 22, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The Disney Channel isn't exactly rebranding, but it is changing its logo and its network IDs to reflect a new, less boxy look that is going live on most of its networks tomorrow. The original logo started life as a temporary fix when widescreen television sets became the norm, and managed to stick for years, Ron Pomerantz, vp of marketing and creative at the Disney Channel, told Adweek. Now that the network is changing its look, Pomerantz and the rest of the marketing group are trying to make sure it's both consistent and sensible. "We took the 'wand ID'"—Disney Channel's iconic station-identification spot, which you can watch below—"which is so important to our network, and made sure it could still work," said Pomerantz. The task was complicated by the wide reach of the Disney brand. "Take Good Luck Charlie, for example," Pomerantz said of a show that's not currently airing in the U.S. anymore. "A lot of countries are still airing it new. Could we take the green-screen of a star like Bridgit Menler and make a wand ID using the new logo?" With some careful tweaking, they could make old footage work with new branding. "A lot of our interstitials that are more evergreen, we have to switch the packaging over to the new packaging. You don't want inconsistency in your brand no matter what your brand is." Richard Loomis, svp and CMO of Disney Channels Worldwide called the development of the product "a global process." "Our team here in Burbank worked with an agency in Burbank, and our team in Germany, and our European regional teams, and there was a team out of a creative agency in Germany," he said. Those agencies, by the way, are Royale (in Los Angeles) and BDA (in Germany), and kudos to them, too.

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This Real-Time Game from Adventure Time’s Creator Is the Best Thing on Twitter in Years

May 21, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just as the doubters were writing Twitter's obituary , animator and Adventure Time creator Pendleton Ward had to go and show that the network can still have a few fun surprises after all. On Tuesday, Ward tweeted a rough sketch of a prison cell, with this comment: "You wake up in a dungeon cell. What do you do." Fans who played along were rewarded with fun and laughably literal results to their suggested actions, such as "talk to the guard" or "kiss rat." Ward found time to keep the game going today, changing the name on his account to Quest Attack. For children of the '80s, it's a fun flashback to early adventure games like Zork and its graphical successors like King's Quest, all of which required you to carefully type out each command. Check out the first two days of Quest Attack below, then be sure to follow Ward on Twitter to stay up to date.

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Why AMC Wants You to Watch the Whole First Episode of Halt & Catch Fire Early on Tumblr

May 20, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If AMC's corporate strategy has embraced a single ethos over the last few years, it's that more people watching is better, period. So it's probably not a surprise that the network elected to release the premiere episode of its new drama Halt & Catch Fire, a period show about the competitive 1980's personal computing scene, on Tumblr

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Billboard Music Awards Stomps Good Wife, Amazing Race Finales

May 20, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The week got off to a good start for ABC: the network's Sunday broadcast of the Billboard Music Awards won out handily over season finales of The Good Wife and The Amazing Race on CBS, both of which were flat in 18-49. The Billboard show hit a 13-year audience high—a rarity in an age of increased fragmentation. Billboard, like Adweek, is owned by affiliates of Guggenheim Partners.

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5 Time Slot Brawls to Watch This Fall

May 19, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With radically altered prime-time lineups at ABC and Fox, football on Thursday at CBS, and an NBC slate without its Thursday comedy block, the season is shaping up to be anything but the same old story. The only network that didn’t really change much was The CW, which is sticking with its costumes-and-cheekbones formula. Here are our matchups to keep an eye on:

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Jackie de Crinis Returns From Paradise to Take On USA’s Wider Development Mission

May 19, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

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The More Things Change: What’s Old Is New Again at the CW

May 15, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

There are few surprises on the CW's upfront schedule, besides virgins. It's a good time for the network's comic-book-heavy prime-time lineup: Arrow will be joined by spinoff The Flash in the fall; and the 100, Hart of Dixie and Beauty and the Beast will all be back, though Beauty doesn't get a slot until midseason. And of course, Jane the Virgin, which the network announced for Monday nights at 9, putting it opposite sitcoms on both CBS and NBC and Dancing With the Stars on ABC. Offbeat help-me-I'm-undead show iZombie (based, like Flash and Arrow, on the DC Comics property, though iZombie hails from DC's "grown-up" line, Vertigo) will also premiere during the second half of the season. THE CW’s 2014-2015 PRIMETIME SCHEDULE MONDAY 8-9 p.m.

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Turner Upfront Slate Tries for Younger Viewers, Even Male/Female Split

May 14, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Without Steve Koonin at the helm for the first time in years, Turner is giving the floor to head of programming Michael Wright this morning. The networks are shifting focus, representatives for the network group said in prepared statements, in pursuit of younger audiences and a more balanced male-female demo skew. (At the moment Turner's flagship networks, TNT and TBS, skew female). Also front and center during the presentation now that former ad sales chief David Levy runs the whole shooting match: Donna Speciale, president of Turner Broadcasting ad sales. "The integration of television, online and mobile content is accelerating, and with that, we are all moving quickly to evolve our advertising strategies," Speciale said in the release. It's an acknowledgement that many in the cable world are making, while broadcast tends to push back ("Programmatic buying is the gluten of advertising," Jimmy Kimmel told the ABC upfront audience. "Everyone is talking about it but nobody knows what it is.") Wright has been at the company more than a dozen years, but it's only now that he's getting to make his mark. It's an interesting one, too: remember TNT's Frank Darabont-helmed Mob City last year? The noir theme seems to be one that Wright and company like, because right at the top of the docket is Public Morals, a new scripted series set in the 1960s from writer, director, producer and star Ed Burns. If that's the network's offering for men, Proof seems to be its offering for women: Jennifer Beals, Matthew Modine and Joe Morton (late of well-liked Syfy dramedy Eureka) star in a show about a surgeon (Beals) and a terminally ill billionaire (Modine) who team up to figure out if there's an afterlife. In development, the network has projects from Vince Vaughn, Donnie Wahlberg—who seems to be everywhere these days—and The Blacklist's Joe Carnahan, among others. On TBS, the new offerings that are pretty clearly male/female include Angie Tribeca, from Parks and Rec/The Office star and writer Rashida Jones, an Airplane!-esque spoof of the police procedurals that still dominate much of basic cable. For the ladies, there's Buzzy's, an ensemble workplace comedy about a barbershop, produced by Will & Grace creators David Kohan and Max Mutchnick, which will star Ashley Tisdale. The other Turner news this week has to do with dynamic advertising: the cable group has struck a deal with Comcast for complete current and previous seasons of long-running shows on the networks—"stacking rights," as players in that market have been calling it

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