Posts Tagged ‘network’

ABC Family Upfront Is a Table Read and Screening of Pretty Little Liars

March 19, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

ABC Family isn't messing with success: this evening's upfront took place in the form of a table read (followed by a screening) of the season finale for Pretty Little Liars, one of the most popular shows on television in the teen/young adult demo (women 12-34). Rather than screen new material, the network is simply deepening its bench: no new series green lights were announced, but executives have commissioned three new pilots. The first and most interesting, Alice in Arabia, has caused controversy despite having only been in the news for a few hours. The drama follows a teenage American girl kidnapped by her extended Saudi Arabian family who "is held a virtual prisoner in her grandfather's royal compound." Written by a former U.S. Army cryptolinguist who supported NSA missions in the Middle East, the plot summary for the pilot generated controversy with a line about the protagonist trying to get home "while surviving life behind the veil." (Anti-Islamic sentiments frequently single out veils and head scarves.) So there were plenty of tweets like this online:

Read More

GSN Greenlights 4 New Series As Advertiser List Grows

March 18, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Game Show Network (GSN) is evidently crushing it with advertisers, so it has greenlit four new series for this year with the goal of further increasing female viewership. For instance, there's Idiot Test, a brainteaser game show revealed by the company today that's hosted by comedian Ben Gleib . It joins It Takes a Church, a matchmaking series the network dubbed the “anti-Bachelor," and a show called Skin Wars that's hosted by Rebecca Rominjn —a competition-style show that will pit 10 bodypainters against each other for a cash prize. And Mind of a Man recently debuted as a game show where female contestants probe the male psyche. John Zaccario, GSN's evp of sales, said that his company added roughly 70 advertisers in 2013 but didn't name brands.

Read More

Dish Hopper DVR Ads Tied to NCAA Tourney Won’t Mention Turner’s Live-Streaming Service

March 17, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Dish Network has hopped on the March Madness bandwagon with a new marketing campaign highlighting features of its Hopper digital video recorder to let subs watch the NCAA basketball tournament streaming over the Internet. The Dish TV ads, however, neglect to note that all 67 live games of the tourney already will be available to... Read more

Read More

Resurrection Returns Strong for ABC

March 17, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

ABC on Sunday night notched a significant victory in the prime-time ratings race, as the second installment of its new supernatural drama series, Resurrection , dominated the fiercely competitive 9 p.m. time slot. According to Nielsen fast national data, Resurrection scared up 10.8 million viewers and a 3.0 in the 18-49 demo, making it the night’s top-rated program. Resurrection retained 83 percent of its inaugural delivery (3.6), thereby putting a crimp in the time-slot premiere of NBC’s Believe . (When adjusted to reflect live-plus-same-day deliveries, the Resurrection premiere drew a 3.8 in the demo.) After premiering in the 10 p.m. window behind NBC’s The Voice, the J.J. Abrams thriller Believe fell sharply upon taking up residence in its official slot. Last night’s installment of Believe lost nearly half (48 percent) of its opening rating , averaging a 1.4 in the dollar demo.

Read More

Sam Champion Wants to Make The Weather Channel a One-Stop Shop for News

March 17, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Age Sam Champion Age 52 New gig Managing editor, anchor,The Weather Channel Old gig Weather anchor, Good Morning America You’ve said that your new morning show, AMHQ, will cover news, business, sports and other nonweather topics. Will that all be through the prism of weather? Weather affects every story—whether the event happened, whether people got there on time. If you’re talking about the president’s State of the Union address and he’s going to talk about climate change, how does that story “go through the prism of weather”? It’s a factual story. Weather is part of it.

Read More

Nickelodeon’s Jim Perry Is Courting More Adult Advertisers

March 14, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Nickelodeon revealed its slate to advertisers yesterday, and while it's all squeaky-clean kids' fare (well, relatively speaking: "As you can see from the reel, bathroom humor still works," observed Nickelodeon president Cyma Zarghami during the presentation), the network is seeking ad partners with a greater emphasis on categories you wouldn't necessarily associate with children. "Kindle is sponsoring the Kids' Choice Awards," said Jim Perry, head of sales for the Nickelodeon group (which includes Nick proper, Nick Jr. and Nick at Nite), "and we now have over 15 retailers on our air—everything from Target and old Navy to Stride Rite and the Burlington Coat Factory." Obviously, that's not because kids are stealing the car and driving to Target. For many years, the rule that advertisers direct their ads at parents and not children was regarded as pro forma by clients. But in recent years, heightening standards (and parental activism) around unhealthy foods, coupled with the decline of the traditional toy market, have meant that advertisers really do have to use Nick—which controls the vast majority of saleable GRPs in the kids' market—to talk to parents themselves. Perry is way ahead of them. "You can really build a great financial literacy campaign around saving and learning the value of a dollar whether or not you're showing a credit card ad," he said. Placements and integrations like Toyota's SpongeBob ... uh, mobile

Read More

A Look at What the Broadcast TV Networks Have in Store for 2014-15

March 10, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

“Time is a flat circle. Everything we’ve ever done or will do, we’re gonna do over and over and over again.” —Rustin Cohle While his musings have more to do with Nietzsche than Nielsen, True Detective’s nihilist ex-cop just as easily could have been inveighing against the infernal hamster wheel that is broadcast TV’s development process. Two-thirds of the way through another unremarkable season, the pilots designed to replace the failures of 2013-14 are a familiar stew of cop shows, bland comedies and spinoffs. And yet, hope springs eternal … Poised to win its first seasonal ratings crown in 10 years, NBC is still struggling with its Thursday night comedy lineup. All three newcomers have been shuttered, but with 19 sitcom pilots in the hopper, the Peacock has plenty of options. The twin comedy suns that light NBC’s corner of the universe are represented in Tina Fey’s Tooken and Amy Poehler’s Old Soul ; along with a Craig Robinson vehicle and Rob Lowe’s turn as a tennis hustler. These are the only projects that deviate from the cookie-cutter relationship comedy template. On the drama front, the resurrected CBS pilot Babylon Fields could bring NBC’s Wednesday 8 p.m. slot back from the dead. Speaking of CBS , the Eye Network once again has few weak spots to shore up, as it is expected to renew the vast majority of its lineup. (As CBS Corp. CEO Les Moonves said last week, “The problem with our new development is, where do you put it all?”) Having secured the rights to the new Thursday Night Football package , CBS has a powerful new vehicle with which to promote its ailing Monday 10 p.m. slot. Look for Vince Gilligan’s Battle Creek and an untitled Wall Street drama from Taylor Elmore (Justified) and John Cusack to help level the playing field. Fox entertainment chairman Kevin Reilly has made good on his promise to scrap the insanely inefficient custom that is pilot season, jumping straight into seven series orders. Among these are the Batman prequel Gotham, which could make for a nice fit on Monday nights with the returning Sleepy Hollow , and the Rainn Wilson detective strip, Backstrom. Seth MacFarlane, John Mulaney and Fey have comedies in the works for next season when Fox will have as many as six-and-a-half hours to fill each week.

Read More

Meet 12 of the Biggest Young Stars on YouTube

March 10, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

In a way, it all started with Fred Figglehorn, a chipmunk-voiced, fictional 6-year-old with a dysfunctional family, manic energy and anger issues who proved to be catnip to young viewers on YouTube.

Read More

FX Is the Edgiest and Most Prolific Drama Producer on Ad-Supported TV

March 3, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Not so long ago, the prospect of an established actor accepting a role on a television series was as remote as the moons of Saturn. Backsliding from film to the boob tube was a tacit admission of defeat, one that could only lead to the purgatory that was a seat inside a garishly lit 6-foot-square window, flanked by your newfound friends and peers Dixie Carter and ALF. Billy Bob Thornton remembers it well. “When I was coming up, we all did television initially, and that was OK,” he says, speaking from the Calgary set of Fargo , an adaptation of Joel and Ethan Coen’s 1996 theatrical . “I’d get a bit part on Hunter or Matlock or Evening Shade, but if you were already established and you did TV, it meant the next stop was Hollywood Squares.” While certainly in no danger of fading into the long twilight of syndicated game-show obscurity, Thornton says the changing face of the independent film marketplace has made it increasingly difficult to tell the stories he’d like to pursue as a writer and an actor. “The $20-30 million adult drama, the medium-budget independent film, is a vanishing breed,” Thornton says. “Especially an adult drama with humor, which is my wheelhouse. Television has taken the place of those films. And there’s nothing wrong with that.”

Read More

You Won’t Believe How Big TV Still Is

March 3, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As the upfronts approach and the NewFronts try again to imitate them, expect to hear a lot about the twilight of traditional television with the rise of digital video. But don’t believe it. A new study from Nielsen reveals the depth and breadth of both universes, and comparative viewership numbers aren’t even close. The study, conducted with ad targeting firm Simulmedia , contains plenty of insights, but among the most striking is the size of either industry. Nielsen rarely pulls back the veil on exactly how big the TV and video worlds are (they do mint the currency in the former, after all), but here it is in black and white: There are 283 million television viewers monthly (the population of the United States is 313 million), each watching an average of 146 hours of TV. Compare that with 155 million online video viewers averaging just shy of six hours monthly on mobile and almost six and a half hours over the Web. So while TV’s audience is still almost twice that of digital video, the amount of money in digital isn’t even 5 percent of the mammoth $74 billion chunk of change in television. What’s going to bring about growth in the former, said Amit Seth, Nielsen’s evp, global media products, is equivalency. ABC already offers digital options for audience deficiency units (ADUs, or makegoods), and Fox said last year it would provide Hulu inventory for the same purpose (neither network was able to provide comment by press time), but Seth said he foresees greater porousness between digital video and TV. The company isn’t just hoping for that—Nielsen’s oft-delayed DPR product, which measures non-mobile streaming video, is set to finally launch in the spring. Nielsen also will be continuing to refine a tool that other third-party data miners are already selling: purchaser data that gives a measurable ROI to advertisers. “We have access to 90-plus percent of credit card transactions, anonymized through a third-party data provider,” said Seth. “Do you shop home improvement? If so, do you shop at Home Depot or at Lowe’s?” Nielsen now knows. Content producers like NBCUniversal have pioneered similar initiatives, but it’s impossible to overstate the importance of third-party measurement as the analytics world gets more complicated. Lest this sound like too much progress too quickly, Dave Morgan, founder and CEO of Simulmedia, says not to worry. Business as usual will probably continue apace for a while. “The silos aren’t coming down anytime soon,” said Morgan

Read More