Posts Tagged ‘network’

Fox Hopes Its Brooklyn Nine-Nine/New Girl Crossover Will Boost Slumping Tuesday Ratings

October 11, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

We've seen The CW and CBS superheroes band together to defeat a common foe—and boost ratings in the process. Now, Fox is hoping that a team-up of its own comedy stars can help turn around its season. Tonight, the network is airing a crossover event for its two Tuesday night comedies, Brooklyn Nine-Nine and New Girl. It begins during the Brooklyn Nine-Nine episode at 8 p.m., when New Girl's Jess (Zooey Deschanel) crosses paths with Nine-Nine detective Jake (Andy Samberg). The crossover continues during New Girl at 8:30, where the whole New Girl cast flies from Los Angeles to New York and stumbles upon several Nine-Nine characters.

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BBC America Teases 2 New Shows (and the Return of Doctor Who) at New York Comic-Con

October 7, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

What's one huge lesson Sarah Barnett, president of BBC America, has learned from events like Comic-Con? "Be superfans of your fans!" That's the approach BBC America brought to this year's New York Comic-Con, where it took over Madison Square Garden, with panels and mini-screeners for conventiongoers, as the first TV network to expand its presentation into that massive theater. Comic-Con, which also takes place in San Diego every year, is a place where fans come first. TV shows and networks combine with high-profile movies and comic books to create a whirlwind of fandom. "This is one of the most pop-culture literate groups of people," said Barnett. "They know their stuff. And there's an openness to good ideas and content

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Here Are the TV Shows and Networks People Watch Live Most and Least Often

October 7, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

While broadcast viewers are thought to represent a more traditional TV audience than those watching cable, a new report says they are actually less likely to watch programming live than their cable counterparts, especially if the network in question is The CW. That information comes from TiVo Research's Q2 State of TV report, which was released today. The quarterly report tracks time-shifting using TiVo's Media TRAnalytics data set, which anonymously aggregates set-top box data from more than 2.3 million households including TiVo owners and other cable providers. According to the study, while the vast majority of TV viewing continues to be live, broadcast network prime-time viewing is more likely to be time-shifted than cable programming. Twenty-six percent of broadcast prime-time programming was time-shifted during the second quarter (23 percent overall was watched in the C3 window, from the same day to three days later; the other 3 percent was time-shifted four to seven days). In total day viewing, 20 percent of broadcast programing was time-shifted. For cable prime-time viewing during the quarter, 88 percent was viewed live, with total day viewing even higher at 91 percent. The CW is the most time-shifted of the broadcast networks. Only 56 percent of its viewers watch live in prime time.

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Here’s How The CW Is Forging Its Own Digital Path, Without Hulu

October 3, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

This week, as The CW begins to debut its season premieres, viewers used to streaming those shows on Hulu will be in for a surprise. The network's five-year deal with the streaming service has lapsed, which means that for the first time, The CW's website and apps will have exclusive in-season streaming rights to its shows like Supergirl , which has migrated over from CBS, Jane the Virgin and The Flash . It's a brave new digital world for The CW, which created its CW Seed digital platform in 2013 in part so it would one day be prepared to go it alone without Hulu. Last week, the network rolled out its CW app on Roku, Apple TV, Xbox, Chromecast and Amazon Fire, and will be amping up marketing efforts to direct audiences to the new digital destinations. "When you know this is the only place you have to go, that makes a big difference, and it helps our business model," said network president Mark Pedowitz. While ABC, Fox and NBC, whose parent companies jointly own Hulu, were able to sell a big chunk of their ad inventory on the streaming service, The CW was not given the same access to Hulu ad revenue. (That did not change when Time Warner, which jointly owns The CW with CBS Corp., acquired a 10 percent stake in Hulu in August.) "We had none of it, and I'm sure a lot of advertisers went there to get our shows," said Rob Tuck, evp, national sales for The CW. "The advertisers had been looking for more from us because our inventory was somewhat constrained, and we now have been able to release it. We've got a lot more available to us, and clients definitely responded. Our digital growth this year was really significant." Sources close to Hulu counter that the company didn't want to pay more to renew its deal, and be required to take on the entire network's portfolio without in-season stacking rights to all episodes of a current season when only The Flash and Arrow were generating meaningful traffic on the site. In addition to being the only network to offer unauthenticated access via its apps ("our median age on digital is 23, and our viewer does not want to authenticate," explained Tuck), Pedowitz and Tuck have reduced The CW's digital ad load this season, from 12 minutes per hour, which mirrored the linear load, to seven-to-nine minutes per hour. "We're trying to figure out what is the right load so that viewers feel that they've had a great viewing experience," said Pedowitz. While The CW ended its partnership with one SVOD, it has enhanced its relationship with another. In July, the network signed a lucrative, multiyear deal with Netflix, giving that company exclusive streaming rights to full seasons of each CW series, beginning just eight days after its season finale. Under its previous CW deal, Netflix did not get streaming access until several months after a season had concluded

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How the Unlikely Alliance of Ovation’s ‘Versailles’ and Fiat Benefits Both Brands

September 26, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

There's a sexy, lavish new series coming to cable TV, set in the 17th century, that brings a distinctly modern style to the story of King Louis XIV and his royal court outside Paris. But as contemporary as Versailles may be, don't expect the Sun King to hop behind the wheel of a Fiat , though the brand is the exclusive auto partner for the 10-episode show airing on the Ovation network . The partnership between period piece and marketer is playing out in branded content and behind-the-scenes vignettes that weave together the attributes of both, with nary an in-show product placement. It's part of a trend on television where fantasy, sci-fi, period, animation and unscripted series are increasingly creating what might on the surface seem to be unlikely pairings with brands. For Versailles, which centers on the 28-year-old French ruler and his impossibly beautiful courtiers, there's a focus on design, art and fashion, along with the obligatory palace intrigue, backstabbing and bed-hopping. (Think The Tudors with less gore.) "Even though it's a period piece, there's nothing stodgy about it," said Liz Janneman, Ovation's evp, network strategy. "It's a fashion-forward modern classic with a twist for a cultured audience." As it happens, Fiat sees itself the same way, with the partners collaborating on nearly 100 pieces of content that promote both the show and the carmaker's new 500X crossover sports utility vehicle. Those will include exclusive set visits, deep dives with show creators and historical perspectives, but no Fiats ferrying corseted characters. The alliance with Fiat, which is also sponsoring the limited-commercial, two-hour premiere on Oct. 1, isn't about "the literal connection" but the thematic one, Janneman said. Putting two such bedfellows together is "more challenging, but the result is more interesting," she said. Versailles is one of many such examples where marketers might have thought there was no room for them but found instead, via some creative thinking, that even surreal-world shows can include brands. These are what Kevin McAuliffe, branded content veteran who now heads Francis Productions, calls "contextual opportunities" that match a TV property and a brand with "similar belief systems." He said, "It's been an evolution, but brands are less about integration now and more about connecting with a message. You're driving value instead of just being exposed." Geico has used costume-clad marauding men to intentionally comic effect for its recent ties to History's action drama, Vikings, and Fitbit chose an appropriately creepy zombie theme for its link with AMC's massive hit, The Walking Dead. Ford sidled up to The CW's time-traveling superhero show, DC's Legends of Tomorrow, and Fox's comic-based Gotham with commercials and digital shorts featuring the series' actors. The marriage doesn't even have to be within the same species or galaxy, said Marc DeBevoise, CBS Interactive president and COO, who noted that he's considering contemporary brands as partners for the upcoming Star Trek: Discovery. Or it could be closer to home.

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FX Will Show America’s Uncomfortable Truths in Its People v. O.J. Followup About Hurricane Katrina

September 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story has been more successful than even FX could have imagined. The miniseries won nine Emmys in all Sunday night, including outstanding limited series, and was watched by an average of 12.6 million people across all platforms. Now FX is shifting its focus to the second season of American Crime Story, which will focus on Hurricane Katrina and its aftermath. The decision raised eyebrows when it was first revealed in January, given that the topic would seem to be less palatable to audiences than People v. O.J. was. Yet the network has never wavered in its Katrina plans, says FX Networks CEO John Landgraf, who noted that a 10-episode miniseries focusing on the Simpson trial was met with just as much initial skepticism as Katrina was. Katrina "was our only choice from the very beginning," said Landgraf. "If we're all honest—and I'll be honest on my behalf—when we heard they're going to make something based on The People v. O.J. Simpson, it was like, 'Really? Do we really need that?' Because essentially on its face, what we had is cheesy, self-serving, profit-seeking, poor narrative built around that story. The reason we wanted to do it was that we could see from Jeff Toobin's book and from [Scott] Alexander and [Larry] Karaszewski's scripts and through our producers, that actually it was something much richer and more humane and deeper." Then, after People v.

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All 5 Broadcast Network Presidents Share Their Fall TV Playbooks

September 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After a season where none of the five broadcast networks grew their 18-49 audience (and ABC, Fox and NBC lost viewers in that demo), they will try to reverse that trend in the 2016-17 season, which officially kicks off Sept. 19. Over the next six weeks, the nets will roll out 20 new shows, plus 61 returning series. Adweek sat down with each of the network chiefs to talk about their strategy for the new season. Adweek: What's your most improved time slot this fall? Glenn Geller, president, CBS Entertainment: We have a real opportunity this year to grow a number of time periods: Fridays at 8 [with MacGyver], Tuesdays at 9 and 10 [with Bull and the relocated NCIS: New Orleans] and Mondays at 8 [with Kevin Can Wait and Man With a Plan]. Robert Greenblatt, chairman, NBC Entertainment: Thursdays at 9. Thursday is a night that we're reconfiguring, and Chicago Med is a really strong show that I hope will bring an audience with it to that time period. It wasn't doing badly with [The] Blacklist, but with Blacklist at 10 and Chicago Med in front of it, that time period could be improved. Gary Newman, co-chairman and co-CEO, Fox Television Group: I would expect it to be Wednesdays at 8, with Lethal Weapon. Channing Dungey, president, ABC Entertainment: Wednesdays at 10, with Designated Survivor. Mark Pedowitz, president, The CW: Mondays at 8 [with Supergirl, which The CW picked up from CBS].

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ABC’s New President Is Making History, and She’s Focused on Making Waves This Fall

September 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The year 2016 has been a whirlwind for Channing Dungey, who was promoted to ABC Entertainment president in February, succeeding Paul Lee. Thrust into the job as pilot season was in full swing, Dungey responded by fielding a new lineup for the 2016-17 season that includes two of the most acclaimed new fall shows, Designated Survivor and Speechless, which she hopes will jolt ABC out of fourth place in the 18-49 demo. As she put the finishing touches on the new season, Dungey sat down with Adweek to talk about her first seven months on the job, making history as the first African-American woman to run a broadcast network, and what's next. Adweek: You started this job in the midst of pilot season, in February. Have you had a chance to take a breath yet? Channing Dungey: I feel like you have go through the whole cycle one time in a new role to really feel like you understand all of it. The television business has ebbs and flows, so I did get away for a week with my family and my parents and my sister, to have a little beach vacation. But for the most part, I've been really boots on the ground, wanting to take everything in as I go through this first cycle. What have these seven months on the job been like for you? They've been good. I have a fantastic team of people with whom I work. I'm very excited about that

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Mode Media Shuts Down, Leaving Freelancers Unpaid

September 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just two years ago, Mode Media founder and chief executive Samir Arora described his Silicon Valley startup (formerly known as Glam Media) as "a pioneer of native advertising and content marketing," and boasted that after just 10 years it had grown to become "the 7th largest U.S. media company, reaching 50 percent of the U.S. digital population." Thursday evening, The Wall Street Journal reported the lifestyle content company once valued at $1 billion had shut down operations—leaving a network of content creator "partners" owed tens of thousands of dollars. Crissy Page, an Ohio-based writer who served as a contributing editor for Mode Media's parenting vertical, Tend, says the company owes her $17,000. Page says the shutdown came without any warning. "Work was ongoing right up until the last moment. I was receiving feedback about content for clients as recently as two days ago, which tells me that the account managers had no idea that the doors would be closing." Calls to Mode late Thursday went unanswered. Page says she reached one company contact at home, who gave her little hope of ever being paid. "She told me that all employee email accounts were immediately cut off when they sent people home." The company has pulled some of its content off the web—along with access to financial documents that Mode Media's content partners used to track what they were owed. "Personally, I did not see this coming," said writer Jaleesa Howard.

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Why Don’t Movie Studios Produce Their Own Podcasts? Blame Paris Hilton (Maybe)

September 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When I saw Adweek was taking a look at how marketers and advertisers in various industries are using audio as part of the mix, I thought, "Great! There's plenty to talk about there when it comes to how movie studios do it." Yeah, not so much. Movie studios are great at two things when it comes to audio formats: 1) Getting their talent to appear on podcasts, which is really just an extension of getting them on terrestrial radio; and 2) Sponsoring podcasts, particularly to raise awareness of their new releases, specifically smaller movies or those with some level of prestige. In my research and experience, I could identify only two examples of originally produced, owned podcasts that were created to promote new theatrical releases. The first was back in 2005 which, if you'll remember, was the first time podcasts were considered the hot new media format. (Yes, millennials, podcasts were around before the first season of Serial. Let's move on.) It was, if you can believe it, produced to promote the remake of House of Wax starring Elisha Cuthbert, Chad Michael Murray and others, and was hosted—hang on here— by costar Paris Hilton. That's right. Jump in the Wayback Machine to a strange time when Paris Hilton was everywhere in the media. And someone paid her to "host" a podcast that was ostensibly about the movie but which, based on the few episodes I listened to, mentioned said movie only a couple of times.

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