Posts Tagged ‘network’

All 5 Broadcast Network Presidents Share Their Fall TV Playbooks

September 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After a season where none of the five broadcast networks grew their 18-49 audience (and ABC, Fox and NBC lost viewers in that demo), they will try to reverse that trend in the 2016-17 season, which officially kicks off Sept. 19. Over the next six weeks, the nets will roll out 20 new shows, plus 61 returning series. Adweek sat down with each of the network chiefs to talk about their strategy for the new season. Adweek: What's your most improved time slot this fall? Glenn Geller, president, CBS Entertainment: We have a real opportunity this year to grow a number of time periods: Fridays at 8 [with MacGyver], Tuesdays at 9 and 10 [with Bull and the relocated NCIS: New Orleans] and Mondays at 8 [with Kevin Can Wait and Man With a Plan]. Robert Greenblatt, chairman, NBC Entertainment: Thursdays at 9. Thursday is a night that we're reconfiguring, and Chicago Med is a really strong show that I hope will bring an audience with it to that time period. It wasn't doing badly with [The] Blacklist, but with Blacklist at 10 and Chicago Med in front of it, that time period could be improved. Gary Newman, co-chairman and co-CEO, Fox Television Group: I would expect it to be Wednesdays at 8, with Lethal Weapon. Channing Dungey, president, ABC Entertainment: Wednesdays at 10, with Designated Survivor. Mark Pedowitz, president, The CW: Mondays at 8 [with Supergirl, which The CW picked up from CBS].

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ABC’s New President Is Making History, and She’s Focused on Making Waves This Fall

September 18, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The year 2016 has been a whirlwind for Channing Dungey, who was promoted to ABC Entertainment president in February, succeeding Paul Lee. Thrust into the job as pilot season was in full swing, Dungey responded by fielding a new lineup for the 2016-17 season that includes two of the most acclaimed new fall shows, Designated Survivor and Speechless, which she hopes will jolt ABC out of fourth place in the 18-49 demo. As she put the finishing touches on the new season, Dungey sat down with Adweek to talk about her first seven months on the job, making history as the first African-American woman to run a broadcast network, and what's next. Adweek: You started this job in the midst of pilot season, in February. Have you had a chance to take a breath yet? Channing Dungey: I feel like you have go through the whole cycle one time in a new role to really feel like you understand all of it. The television business has ebbs and flows, so I did get away for a week with my family and my parents and my sister, to have a little beach vacation. But for the most part, I've been really boots on the ground, wanting to take everything in as I go through this first cycle. What have these seven months on the job been like for you? They've been good. I have a fantastic team of people with whom I work. I'm very excited about that

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Mode Media Shuts Down, Leaving Freelancers Unpaid

September 16, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just two years ago, Mode Media founder and chief executive Samir Arora described his Silicon Valley startup (formerly known as Glam Media) as "a pioneer of native advertising and content marketing," and boasted that after just 10 years it had grown to become "the 7th largest U.S. media company, reaching 50 percent of the U.S. digital population." Thursday evening, The Wall Street Journal reported the lifestyle content company once valued at $1 billion had shut down operations—leaving a network of content creator "partners" owed tens of thousands of dollars. Crissy Page, an Ohio-based writer who served as a contributing editor for Mode Media's parenting vertical, Tend, says the company owes her $17,000. Page says the shutdown came without any warning. "Work was ongoing right up until the last moment. I was receiving feedback about content for clients as recently as two days ago, which tells me that the account managers had no idea that the doors would be closing." Calls to Mode late Thursday went unanswered. Page says she reached one company contact at home, who gave her little hope of ever being paid. "She told me that all employee email accounts were immediately cut off when they sent people home." The company has pulled some of its content off the web—along with access to financial documents that Mode Media's content partners used to track what they were owed. "Personally, I did not see this coming," said writer Jaleesa Howard.

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Why Don’t Movie Studios Produce Their Own Podcasts? Blame Paris Hilton (Maybe)

September 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When I saw Adweek was taking a look at how marketers and advertisers in various industries are using audio as part of the mix, I thought, "Great! There's plenty to talk about there when it comes to how movie studios do it." Yeah, not so much. Movie studios are great at two things when it comes to audio formats: 1) Getting their talent to appear on podcasts, which is really just an extension of getting them on terrestrial radio; and 2) Sponsoring podcasts, particularly to raise awareness of their new releases, specifically smaller movies or those with some level of prestige. In my research and experience, I could identify only two examples of originally produced, owned podcasts that were created to promote new theatrical releases. The first was back in 2005 which, if you'll remember, was the first time podcasts were considered the hot new media format. (Yes, millennials, podcasts were around before the first season of Serial. Let's move on.) It was, if you can believe it, produced to promote the remake of House of Wax starring Elisha Cuthbert, Chad Michael Murray and others, and was hosted—hang on here— by costar Paris Hilton. That's right. Jump in the Wayback Machine to a strange time when Paris Hilton was everywhere in the media. And someone paid her to "host" a podcast that was ostensibly about the movie but which, based on the few episodes I listened to, mentioned said movie only a couple of times.

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Sesame Street Fans No Longer Need HBO to Watch Elmo and Cookie Monster on TV

August 25, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For the past year, the only way to get to Sesame Street—and watch new episodes featuring Elmo, Big Bird, Cookie Monster and the rest of the gang—was by subscribing to HBO, which has exclusive rights to the show through 2020. But starting in September, Sprout is offering fans a new way to see two of those characters without subscribing to the premium cable network. Elmo and Cookie Monster will appear in The Furchester Hotel, a new series on Sprout from Sesame Workshop and the BBC's preschool children's channel, CBeebies. The show takes place at a hotel operated by a family of monsters, including Funella Furchester, husband Furgus Fuzz and daughter Phoebe Furchester-Fuzz. Elmo, who is Phoebe's cousin, is on "an extended visit," according to a release, while Cookie Monster works at the hotel as a room-service and dining-room waiter. Both Elmo and Cookie Monster will be regular characters on the show. Beginning Sept. 26, 11-minute episodes of The Furchester Hotel will air weekdays at 9 a.m. and weekends at 11 a.m. (the weekend time slot will shift to 7 a.m.

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Viceland Suffers From Low Ratings Despite Its Young Audience

August 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When Viceland launched in February, the network struck an agreement with Nielsen to keep its ratings private for six months. Shortly before that window is set to lapse, the first look at those Nielsen ratings are out, revealing that while the audience is a lot younger than that of the channel it replaced, H2, it's also a lot smaller. Viceland's average 18-49 prime-time audience in July was just 45,000, less than half of the 92,000 that H2 averaged in the demo last July, according to Nielsen ratings obtained by The Wall Street Journal . The deal that Viceland, a partnership between Vice and A+E Networks, struck with Nielsen is a common arrangement for many new networks as they try to get their bearings in the first months after launching. Nielsen will still not be publicly releasing Viceland's ratings for at least another week as part of that deal. While Viceland's audience is much smaller than H2's, it's also younger. The median viewer age dropped 17 years between July 2015 and July 2016, from 57 to 40. And Nielsen data found that the average 18-49 prime-time audience for the network's July premieres was up significantly, from 59,000 for H2 to 102,000 for Viceland. Depsite the premiere spin, those 18-49 ratings seem disappointing, especially given the buzz around Viceland. However, A+E Networks president and CEO Nancy Dubuc said she is taking a long-term view. "You have to look at what is the promise of H2 10 years from now, versus what is the promise of Viceland 10 years from now," Dubuc told the Journal. Viceland looked to shake up TV advertising by running more native ads that look like editorial and reducing ad load. The network's programming has just eight minutes of national ad time per hour and two minutes of local time. Shortly after the network launched, execs were already trying to downplay linear ratings expectations. Guy Slattery, general manager for Viceland, told Adweek in March that Viceland content is available on the website, app and VOD in addition to the linear networks, but Nielsen's numbers only reflect its linear ratings. "It's an important metric, but it only captures one piece of the multiplatform approach that we have," Slattery said. "So we didn't want to make it all about that. The headlines tend to go to Nielsen ratings, and we don't feel they're going to capture the viewing of this network, particularly among the demo that we're going after

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NBC Gets Its Lowest Olympics Ratings Since Saturday, but Men’s Basketball Boosts NBCSN

August 11, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Wednesday night's Rio Olympics action featured a victory for U.S. beach volleyball stars Kerri Walsh Jennings and April Ross, another gold medal for legendary Japanese gymnast Kohei Uchimura, and a gold in the 200-meter freestyle relay for Katie Ledecky and the U.S. women. But the action Wednesday couldn't match Tuesday night's heroics, and early Nielsen ratings reflect that. The network delivered a 17.4 overnight rating (down 21 percent from the previous night) and an 8.9 prime-time rating in the 18-49 demo, which was down 11 percent from Tuesday night. They were the lowest figures since NBC Olympics' Saturday evening coverage. (Average total viewer figures will be released later this afternoon.) It was a positive evening for NBCSN, however. The U.S. men's basketball win over Australia and Brazil's defeat of Denmark in men's soccer gave the network a an Olympics-best 1.41 overnight rating. Salt Lake City (24.4) was once again the top local market for NBC Olympics evening coverage, followed by Denver (22.3), Indianapolis (20.0), St. Louis (19.4) and Columbus (19.2).

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Here’s Why NBC Believes Viewers Are So Frustrated With Olympics Ads

August 6, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

While 28 percent fewer people tuned into NBC's Rio Olympics opening ceremony than London's Summer Games four years ago, some of those who did watch Friday night weren't happy with what they considered a series of commercials occasionally interrupted by an opening ceremony. Viewers took to social media to complain about NBC's heavy ad load during the ceremony, especially early on, and the network's decision to air and stream the ceremony on a one-hour delay. NBC Sports, however, told Adweek that the ad load was "very similar" to that for the London opening ceremony, but because viewing habits have changed so much in the past four years, the commercial breaks are now more noticeable to audiences. They sure were. Many viewers took to Reddit and social media (some using the hashtag #nbcfail) to complain about NBC's presentation of the opening ceremony: In effort to realize record profits from Rio 2016, NBC to become first network to air more than 60 minutes of commercials in a single hour. — Norman Chad (@NormanChad) August 6, 2016 Conversation in NBC conference room. "If we tape delay one hour we can add a full hour of commercials." "Brilliant." #OpeningCeremony — Bob Kevoian (@bobkevoian) August 6, 2016 nbc olympics coverage: where there are commercials about commercials — Sam Stryker (@sbstryker) August 6, 2016 That response could be alarming news for NBC Sports, which has already sold $1.2 billion in national Olympics ads, 75 percent of which accounted for advertising in NBC's prime-time coverage. "As we did for London, we inserted a few more commercials earlier in the show so that we can afford time later in the show to present as much of the ceremony as we can, including every single country in the Parade of Nations," said an NBC Sports spokesperson. "Given that the commercial load was very similar to London, we believe that consumption habits, such as binge-watching and 'marathoning,' have changed perceptions among the viewing audience regarding commercials." Once the ceremony got under way, NBC did space out the ad breaks closer to 15 minutes, which was less frequent that the usual seven-minute average between ad breaks. As for the decision to broadcast and stream the opening ceremony on a one-hour delay, NBC Sports Group chairman Mark Lazarus said last month that while Rio would be the most "live" Olympics yet because it's only an hour ahead of the East Coast, the network was delaying the opening ceremony "to give context to the show. This opening ceremony will be a celebration of Brazilian culture, of the pageantry, of the excitement, of the flare that this beautiful nation has. And we think it's important that we're able to be that in context for the viewer so it's not just a flash of color." After Friday night's social media outrage, an NBC Sports spokesperson offered a further explanation for the opening ceremony delay: "It's not a sports competition. It's a cultural ceremony that requires deep levels of understanding, with numerous camera angles and our commentary laid over it

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The Return of ‘Stephen Colbert’ and Jon Stewart Gives Late Show a Ratings Boost

July 19, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

CBS had hoped that its decision to broadcast The Late Show with Stephen Colbert live during both political convention weeks would give the show the boost in ratings and buzz that it's been seeking for months. Last night, the return of two longtime Comedy Central pals—his Colbert Report alter ego and Jon Stewart—helped the program do just that. Monday night's Late Show live broadcast beat its competitors in the 56 overnight metered markets with a 2.1 rating, its best overnight household rating since May 10. That put it ahead of The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon (2.0) and Jimmy Kimmel Live (1.5). Late Show, which is broadcasting live during both political conventions, averaged a 0.5 rating in the 18-49 demo in the 25 local people meter markets. It was the show's best rating since Feb. 15, but still wasn't enough to overtake The Tonight Show, which had a 0.7. These ratings will be updated later today when national ratings are available. Season to date, Late Show is averaging a 0.62 in 18-49, with 2.8 million viewers overall, which is well behind The Tonight Show (a 1.01 rating and 3.7 million total viewers). Kimmel is in third place with a 0.56 demo rating and 2.4 million total viewers

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NBC Sets Fall Premiere Dates and Will Use ‘The Voice’ to Launch Its 3 New Series

June 15, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Because NBC's No. 1 series, Sunday Night Football, stretches well past 11 p.m., the network can't use it to help any of its new shows this fall. Instead, the network is making the most of its No. 2 show, The Voice, which it will deploy to launch all three of its new fall series, NBC announced today. The Voice, with new coaches Alicia Keys and Miley Cyrus, kicks off Season 11 on Monday, Sept. 19. Then NBC will air two episodes of its new Kristen Bell-Ted Danson comedy, The Good Place, which moves to its regular 8:30 p.m. Thursday spot on Sept. 22. (Trailers and descriptions of NBC's three new shows can be found here.) New drama This Is Us will debut Tuesday, Sept. 20, after The Voice's Tuesday airing and will remain at 10 p.m. for three weeks until moving to its regular 9 p.m. slot on Oct. 11

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