Posts Tagged ‘network’

Talk Presents ENGAGE: NYC The Digital Storytelling Conference

Talk Presents ENGAGE: NYC The Digital Storytelling Conference

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March 22, 2017  |  Blog  |  No Comments

ENGAGE: The NYC Digital Storytelling Conference is set for April 19th, 2017.  Dana Settle, Wenda Harris Millard and Andrew Morse join NYC's agency, marketing and tech community to talk about digital storytelling.       This week we're excited to announce that Dana Settle, Co-Founder and Partner of Greycroft Partners will join the program along with Andrew Morse, Co-Founder of Great Big Story and Wenda Harris Millard, Vice Chairman of MediaLink.  Engage NYC is the first conference in NYC to explore the role and future of digital storytelling. The conference explores how advertisers, publishers and platforms leverage content as a tool to create unique engagement and build immersive experiences. Prior speakers

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HBO Built Fun, Intricate Escape Rooms at SXSW for Veep, Silicon Valley and Game of Thrones

March 14, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Veep, "Oval Office" If there's one thing HBO does well, it's creating an environment that's rich in detail on your television screen. At South by Southwest this year, the network is giving attendees a real treat--HBO: The Escape, an activation that turned the famous sets of Veep, Silicon Valley and Game of Thrones into intricate...

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ABC Won’t Rest Until Everyone Knows Scandal (and TGIT) Is Finally Back Tonight

January 26, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After an excruciating eight-month hiatus for ABC, the network tonight finally gets to welcome back its TGIT lineup of Shonda Rhimes-produced Thursday-night dramas: Grey's Anatomy, Scandal (which was delayed until midseason due to Kerry Washington's pregnancy) and How to Get Away With Murder. And ABC's marketing department is making sure its viewers, who abandoned the network on Thursdays at 9 p.m. during the fall, return. ABC's fall replacement for Scandal, freshman drama Notorious, flopped immediately, averaging just a 0.9 rating in the 18-49 demographic, which is less than half of the 2.1 that Scandal brought in last season. It also drained the network's usually robust Thursday-night ad revenue.

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Modelo’s Uplifting Homage to Rural Diversity Wins Adweek’s First Grand Arc Award

January 22, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Modelo's celebration of small-town diversity, created in partnership with CNN's branded content studio, Courageous, has taken home the top honor at Adweek's first Arc Awards. The brand and studio, along with video network Great Big Story, received the Grand Arc at the Saturday evening awards ceremony at the Silver Lake Lodge in Park City, Utah, and hosted by Comedic YouTube duo Tripp and Tyler . The Arc Awards were created to honor excellence in modern storytelling, recognizing work in a wide range of categories across fiction and nonfiction. You can find a full list of 2017 winners here. Called "Fighting for Better," the winning video series was created from a month's worth of footage shot in Garden City, Kansas, a town of 30,000 where more than a dozen languages are spoken. Shannon Pruitt, president of Dentsu Aegis Network's Storylab U.S.

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Will Millennials Care About The CW’s ‘Archie’ Spinoff?

January 18, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As they try to break through the Peak TV glut and grab viewers, broadcast networks have been relying heavily on new shows based on popular intellectual property (IP), like Lethal Weapon, MacGyver and the upcoming Training Day and Taken. But The CW's new drama Riverdale—based on the Archie Comics characters—offers the season's most intriguing test as to whether IP can truly help launch a show, even if its intended audience will likely have very little knowledge of the source material. Riverdale, which premieres Jan. 26, finds Archie, Betty, Veronica and Jughead entangled in racy storylines miles from the world of the squeaky-clean comics book, which launched in the '40s. The premiere episode alone features a murder, a hush-hush student/teacher affair and dark secrets galore. "It's an interesting conundrum: the IP builds awareness, but if you're then changing too much of the DNA, are you risking pushing the audience away?" said executive producer Greg Berlanti, who was intrigued by the opportunity to mine the originality of the characters, which had made the Archie comics so successful. "What was interesting to us was how much can we bring it into a new generation." While The CW's marketing campaigns for its other series based on comic books characters, including Berlanti's shows Arrow, The Flash and Supergirl, relied heavily on consumers' awareness of those characters, its Riverdale campaign doesn't reference Archie at all, aside from a few subtle Easter eggs. "We assumed that everyone we're reaching doesn't know who Archie is," said Rick Haskins, evp, marketing and digital programs. "Thank goodness we have the experience of [former CW hit] Gossip Girl; we know how to do these sexy, gossipy, pop-y things. That's really the playbook we're pulling from: more Gossip Girl than DC Comics." To that end, as he looked to reach women 18-34, Haskins created five major spots, all featuring popular music. The campaign includes buys on musical.ly (the popular music video social network for tweens and teens), and for the first time ever for a CW show, VOD, to target the millennial audience on their preferred viewing platforms. Despite the marketing campaign's millennial focus, The CW president Mark Pedowitz argued that the Archie brand does have some value to viewers. "The importance of the IP was it gives you a hook and something to tag it with; it started a dialogue that Archie was coming back," said Pedowitz, adding that The CW's audience isn't as young as one would guess: its linear median age is around 43 (though its digital median age is 20 years younger than that). He expects at least some old-school Archie fans will be intrigued enough to give Riverdale a try.

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Why CBS Is Airing Its First Saturday Drama Series in 13 Years

January 13, 2017  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For decades, Saturday was an essential component of each broadcast network's prime-time schedule, but in recent years the networks have thrown in the towel on the night, which has the week's lowest HUT (homes using television) levels. That includes CBS, which for years has programmed two hours of drama repeats—called Crimetime Saturday—and newsmagazine 48 Hours to fill the evening. But this winter, CBS is doing something it hasn't attempted in 13 years: airing an original drama, Ransom, on Saturdays. The series, about a crisis and hostage negotiator who tackles kidnappings and ransom cases, is a Canada-France co-production, from independent studio eOne, and cost CBS a fraction of what the network usually spends on its dramas. "We're always looking for opportunities to improve the numbers on the schedule," said CBS Entertainment president Glenn Geller. "Crimetime does just fine, but we had a unique opportunity with Ransom, because it was an international production, and we said, let's see what we can do on Saturday nights." Traditionally, "The night is the last priority for most networks as you're setting your schedule," said Kelly Kahl, senior evp of CBS Primetime. While CBS has used Saturdays to burn off remaining episodes of canceled shows like Made in Jersey and Three Rivers, the network hasn't scheduled dramas on Saturday since the 2003-04 season, when Hack (starring David Morse and Andre Braugher) and The District (with Craig T. Nelson) aired on the night. More recently, CBS tried airing a comedy on Saturday, programming the David Spade sitcom Rules of Engagement there in 2011. But the network abandoned the experiment after just a few weeks, shifting Rules to Thursday to replace the DOA sitcom How to Be a Gentleman (which was burned off on, yes, Saturdays). Because CBS audiences responded to freshman fall series Bull, Kevin Can Wait, Man With a Plan and The Great Indoors, "we're sitting pretty good the other nights of the week," said Kahl. "Every night of the week counts, and as you look at your weekly numbers, an hour on Saturday counts exactly the same as an hour on Monday. So we saw an opportunity there for us." CBS gave Ransom a Sunday launch on Jan. 1, where it drew 6.7 million viewers, and a 0.8 rating in the adults 18-49 demo. Last week, in its first regular airing on Saturday at 8 p.m

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Unruly’s 2017 Predictions on Changing Media Consumption Behaviors

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January 9, 2017  |  Blog  |  No Comments

Here’s what you need know. In 2017, media consumption behaviors will only continue to change as emerging technology continues to evolve - staying on the cutting edge of these consumer behaviors is a big task! Unruly, a digital video distribution agency with a focus on emotional intelligence, has released their social and digital consumption predictions for 2017. Unruly’s managing director Oliver Smith will will be a featured speaker at our upcoming Engage: LA conference. The  report covers the following: Augmented reality has the scale but VR will have deeper impact. Vertical creatives will be the rule rather than the exception in 2017. Audio will have

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How to Revitalize Beloved Pop Culture Brands Like Star Trek, Hannibal and American Gods

December 28, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

These days, one of the safest bets for attracting TV or movie audiences is to rely on existing brand or franchise and try to revitalize it. When it's successful—like the recent Star Wars films or Fox's X-Files revival—it brings in both diehard fans and a fresh audience. Two of the best writers involved in resuscitating beloved pop culture properties are Bryan Fuller (who breathed new life into the stale Hannibal Lecter franchise by turning Thomas Harris' novel Red Dragon into an audacious NBC series) and Michael Green (who worked on Smallville, putting a new spin on the Superman story). Now those two are teaming up for a new, high-profile adaptation, turning Neil Gaiman's acclaimed novel American Gods into a series for Starz, debuting this spring. But American Gods is just one of several major brand refreshes that Fuller or Green are overseeing in 2017. Fuller also co-created the first Star Trek series in 12 years, Star Trek: Discovery, for CBS All Access (though he has since departed the show) and is developing an updated version of the '80s anthology series Amazing Stories for NBC. Meanwhile, Green co-wrote three major franchise films: Logan (a darker, grittier spin on the Wolverine franchise), Alien: Covenant (the follow-up to Prometheus, which more directly ties into Alien) and Blade Runner 2049, which brings back Harrison Ford and whose first trailer generated enthusiastic buzz last week: As they prepare to launch American Gods in the spring, Fuller and Green sat down with Adweek to talk about their approach to breathing new life in beloved pop culture brands, and what they've learned about trying to make fans happy—or not: Adweek: What has to stand out for you when you're looking at an existing brand or a franchise, and trying to make it your own? Bryan Fuller: It has to be about something more than just its own plot, to start with. And you have to be able to isolate your own memory of what it is you loved about it. Because if you take something as broad as a superhero character, everyone came at it at a different time and a different incarnation and a different run of a different artist, and so there are different aspects of the character that are in the soul of it for you. That's the core of adaptation, is you have to be able to dive into those things and celebrate that particular aspect of it. It's about taking those core values of what the piece is and making sure that you can now re-present those things to other people, and hopefully they'll appreciate it in the same way that you did

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AT&T Unveils Pricing and Channel Lineups for Its DirectTV Now Streaming Bundle

November 29, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Starting Wednesday, cord-nevers, cord shavers and cord cutters will have a relatively inexpensive, easy new option to access live TV. AT&T finally unveiled pricing, channel lineups and more details about DirecTV Now, its over-the-top, streaming bundle service, which launches on Wednesday. The service, which doesn't require a set-top box, satellite dish, annual contract or credit checks, will debut with an introductory price of just $35 per month for more than 100 channels. "This is the foundation of how we're going to do things in the future," John Stankey, CEO of AT&T Entertainment Group, told reporters who gathered at New York's Venue 57 for the product launch. He added, "For the first time in our history, we have control of the full stack," explaining that it will use data insights from subscribers to create more targeted advertising capabilities for brands, which will keep its pricing low. With the launch, AT&T is targeting the 20 million-plus U.S. households that don't have cable or satellite service. "We get to address a new audience," said Stankey. "This opens up a whole new segment of the market." (Brad Bentley, evp and CMO at AT&T Entertainment Group, noted that market includes the "5-6 million people" who attempted to sign up for DirecTV but were unable to pass a credit check.) And, the company hopes, it persuades even more subscribers to its "mobile-first" product to switch over to its wireless service. AT&T wireless subscribers will be able to use DirecTV Now without the streaming counting against their data plan. While the service contains almost all of the country's biggest networks, there are a few major omissions. "The only thing missing is CBS and Showtime, which we are working on, actively," said Bentley. (The CW, which is also part of CBS Corp, is also MIA.) While "we're hopeful and optimistic" that AT&T and CBS will come to terms, Stankey noted, "the demographic may be a fit" for a CBS-less lineup—i.e., millennials don't watch CBS. However, they do watch The CW, which isn't available either. And while subscribers in "owned and operated" markets like New York, Los Angeles and Philadelphia will be able to stream broadcast content live on NBC, ABC and Fox, those in smaller, affiliate markets will have to wait until the next day, when they can access network prime-time programming on demand. (The company said it is working with affiliates and hopes to expand its live offerings in the future.) The service also doesn't include DirecTV's prized NFL Sunday Ticket package—Stankey said the company is in talks with the NFL—DVR capabilities (those are coming next year) or the ability to pause live TV. (However, many channels have "72 hour lookback" capabilities.) While Stankey said that subscribers in owned and operated markets will be able to watch NFL games live on Fox and NBC, the feed will not be available to mobile subscribers in those markets, as Verizon retains exclusive NFL mobile streaming rights.

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The Trump Phenomenon Delivered Massive Ratings for Cable News Throughout

November 9, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Say what you want about the outcome, but the 2016 presidential election cycle was unlike any the news media has ever experienced. As you might expect, cable news reaped significant benefits from the volatility of the race in the form of huge ratings. Fox News beat CNN in total audience on election night 2016 during the full coverage block, from 7 p.m. to 3 a.m. Per Nielsen data, FNC delivered 12.2 million viewers compared to CNN's 11.2 million. Fox News' viewership climbed on an hourly basis through midnight, while both CNN and MSNBC peaked at around 10 p.m. The ratings trends seem make sense considering now President-elect Donald Trump gained momentum as the night went on, while Hillary Clinton steadily lost steam. Fox News also beat CNN in the all-important 2-3 a.m. time period, when the race was called.

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