Posts Tagged ‘netflix’

The Guild’s Felicia Day Wrote Herself the Role of a Lifetime

June 22, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Felicia Day’s dearly departed Web series The Guild started before anybody was really talking about the medium—it was a year before the world knew that lonelygirl15 was a work of fiction. But Day, the series’ sole writer for all six of its seasons, says the show was a vital outlet for her at a time when her career as an actress wasn’t offering much fulfillment. “There was never a role that I felt really represented me,” she says. “I used to get shunted to the sidelines as the third best friend or the secretary. I have an unusual background and interests that don’t really align with mainstream entertainment, so I wrote myself a central role.” That role, of a lonely gamer girl who goes by the handle Codex, became both a rallying cry for girls who, like Day, felt underrepresented in mainstream entertainment and ostracized by gamer culture (which, though it contains plenty of women and girls, tends to be dominated by men who aren’t very friendly to them). The show migrated to Xbox after a first season funded by fans donating through PayPal (Kickstarter hadn’t yet been launched). The episode recognized here, “End Game,” brought the show to its conclusion. “It was very emotional, I have to say,” recalls Day. “I’m the only writer, and I got to the point where I said, ‘What’s the cliffhanger for this series?’ and I just didn’t have one.” Day has shifted her focus to Geek & Sundry, part of a YouTube 100-channel initiative launched in 2012, where her duties are more concentrated on production and development. The Guild now lives on Netflix and elsewhere. For Day, the Web series remains a high watermark. “We filled rooms at Comic-Con that TV shows usually fill,” she says. “That will always be a huge accomplishment. Talent - Gold The Guild: End Game: Felicia Day Company: Geek & Sundry

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How Chelsea Handler Changes Our Understanding of Netflix

June 21, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Netflix’s hiring of Chelsea Handler marks the most audacious move the TV industry has seen since “House of Cards” set the benchmark for audacity last year by becoming the first viable premium original series delivered on the Internet. Just in case anyone misinterprets signing Handler as anything less than eye-popping, Netflix made sure to underline... Read more

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Netflix Will Stop Telling Customers Verizon Is Making Their Movies Load Slower

June 9, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Netflix said Monday it would comply with Verizon's cease-and-desist letter, sent to both the general public and Netflix general counsel David Hyman from Verizon general counsel Randal S. Milch. The letter's complaints against Netflix were that the streaming service was misrepresenting the "many different factors that affect traffic on the Internet," including the controversy over whether or not Verizon is obliged to provide free access to its network based on user preference. In response, Netflix said that as part of a "transparency campaign" to tell users when the network they were using was choking Netflix content, "we started a small scale test in early May that lets consumers know, while they’re watching Netflix, that their experience is degraded due to a lack of capacity into their broadband provider’s network. "We are testing this across the U.S. wherever there is significant and persistent network congestion," the company said in a blog post bylined to communications vp Joris Evers. "This test is scheduled to end on June 16. We will evaluate rolling it out more broadly." While this is sort of a non-denial-denial—we don't admit that what we're doing is wrong but coincidentally, we're going to stop doing it—on the heels of the Verizon C&D letter, it comes with yet another dig at Verizon: a post from the company's ISP speed ranker, a fascinating tool you can check out yourself here . With the new site, which appears to dynamically measure average bandwidth—that's actual bandwidth, not advertised bandwidth—you can see that Netflix's data streams a lot slower from Verizon's DSL service (which is definitely incredibly slow), but you can also see, among other things, that the U.S. has some of the slowest streaming speeds in the developed world, below every European country except Ireland and lagging behind much poorer countries elsewhere in the Americas like Mexico and Brazil.

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‘Orange is the New Black’ Season 2: Cast Talks Prison Preconceptions, Breaking Lesbian Stereotypes

June 6, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Mere hours after Netflix premiered season two of “Orange is the New Black” in its entirety online, three of the show’s stars took the stage at the Austin Television Festival to discuss the streaming service’s critically acclaimed drama. Uzo Aduba (Suzanne “Crazy Eyes” Warren), Danielle Brooks (Tasha “Taystee” Jefferson) and Lea DeLaria (Carrie “Big Boo”... Read more

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Jodie Foster, ‘Orange Is the New Black’ Stars Talk Binge-Viewing, Working with Femmes

June 6, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

“We want it when we want it” — that’s how “House of Cards” co-star Robin Wright described the audience’s response to Netflix’s innovation in the way it launches series programming. Wright, Jodie Foster and “Orange is the New Black” thesps Taylor Schilling and Kate Mulgrew talked about changing viewer habits and the impact on their... Read more

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Digital Home Entertainment to Exceed Physical by 2016, Study Finds

June 4, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Box office and digital revenue will climb steadily over the next five years, but rentals and sales of DVDs and other discs will fall sharply, according to a report released Wednesday by PwC. In a sign that the future will be streamed and downloaded, the study projects that electronic home video revenue will exceed that... Read more

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Who Might Replace Fox Chairman Kevin Reilly? Probably Not John Landgraf

May 29, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Fox's chairman Kevin Reilly has stepped down after much upfront-season speculation about how much longer the exec's tenure would last. In his absence he leaves... no one, yet. Reilly's direct reports are all due to have their hotel expenses approved by network group chairman Peter Rice for the moment. It's hard to know who will end up with such a high profile (and, frankly, thankless job), but several people have already suggested FX president John Landgraf, given the success of that network's original programming. Of course, since Fox owns both properties, it might want to keep Landgraf where's he's successful—and anyway, he's insisted he's not interested.

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Nobody Wants to Marry Harry

May 28, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It's not like you could have made a second season of gag reality show I Wanna Marry Harry, anyway, but Fox execs who might have been considering the option aren't going to get the chance with these ratings. The show dipped a painful 48 percent in its second frame (partly due to the loss of lead-in American Idol, which also isn't exactly setting the world on fire , and also probably because the show has been a hate magnet ) after a none-too-spectacular first outing last week. The show is about a guy who pretends to be Prince Harry in order to trick some not-terribly-bright girls into dating him.

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We Play Matchmaker for Merger Candidates AMC, Scripps and IPG

May 27, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Who's next? The recent spree of mergers and acquisitions doesn't appear to be at an end, at least not to the market-watchers at Barron's, who listed Mad Men and Walking Dead network group AMC as a ripe target for investors looking to get into the television game, along with Scripps Networks Interactive, the conglomerate behind the Food Network, HGTV and the Cooking channel. Also a potential bargain: Interpublic Group (IPG). One of the reasons each of these companies looks like a strong candidate for acquisition is its ratio of enterprise value—the amount of capital it would take to purchase the company—to earnings. Buy low, sell high. So who might be interested in each of these organizations? AMC : The network group has gone from strength to strength over the last few years with hits like Mad Men, The Walking Dead and Breaking Bad bringing in revenue not merely from subscribers and advertisers, but from third-party streaming service Netflix, which pays for season-old content of the flagship network's signature serialized dramas. That, in turn, drives live viewership. Morgan Stanley has been cautious about the company, emphasizing the inherent risk in buying a bunch of new shows (which Netflix has indeed done), but its long-term prospects, Morgan Stanley says, are good. Our pick for a nice boyfriend : Netflix, definitely. With a staggering market cap , It's a company with plenty of capital looking for a more stable revenue stream as competition heats up around its core businesses. It's not actually that much bigger than Netflix in revenue terms ($4.37 billion last year vs. $1.59 billion), but its main concern at the moment is off-the-books commitments that could be mitigated by the acquisition of a high-profile content company.

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‘Good Wife,’ ‘Breaking Bad,’ ‘Game of Thrones’ Among Top TCA Award Nominees

May 27, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

“The Good Wife,” “Breaking Bad” and “Game of Thrones” are among the series landing multiple nominations in this year’s Television Critics Assn. Awards derby. HBO’s “True Detective” and Netflix’s “Orange is the New Black” join that trio in the org’s program of the year category, which didn’t leave room for any half-hour comedies. CBS’ “Good... Read more

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