Posts Tagged ‘netflix’

Netflix to Raise $400 Mil in Additional Debt to Fund Original Content, Euro Expansion

February 4, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Netflix formally announced it is seeking to offer $400 million aggregate principal amount of senior notes due 2024 to institutional investors, coin it expects to use for acquiring original content and expanding into Europe. The Internet streaming leader had disclosed plans to raise the additional debt when it reported fourth-quarter 2013 earnings last month. As... Read more

Read More

Super Bowl: Netflix Traffic Fell 20% in First Half, But Bounced Back to Normal Levels

February 3, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Sunday’s Super Bowl evidently pulled Netflix subscribers away from the streaming video service early in the game — but as the Seattle Seahawks padded their lead over the Denver Broncos, Netflix usage returned to regular levels, according to an analysis of Internet traffic patterns during the game. Netflix usage dropped as much a 20% during... Read more

Read More

TV Review: ‘House of Cards’ – Season Two

January 30, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

The first season of “House of Cards” achieved the dual feat of instantly emerging as a first-rate drama while simultaneously being seriously overrated – riding the “Netflix reinvents TV” angle and juicy inside-the-Beltway bits to front-page coverage. No fools they, season two generally proceeds with more of the same, exhibiting a show with abundant strengths... Read more

Read More

No Ads for New Nickelodeon Channel (Yet)

January 15, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

My Nickelodeon Jr. is set to launch on Verizon in the coming months—and presumably on other systems soon thereafter—but there's one thing you won't be seeing on the network at launch: advertisements. The network is a hybrid digital/linear offering that will sit next to toddler-focused Nick Jr. on the Verizon dial, but won't feature that net's sponsor support (Nick Jr. doesn't have interstitial ads, but it does run sponsored spots aimed at parents between shows). Programming will be Nick library content, at least initially. The new network will be programmable, along seven pre-made tracks with names like "super-sonic science" and "get creative," according to The Wall Street Journal , which broke the news this morning. Viacom tested the channel in France last year, where it said results were encouraging. Interestingly, within the WSJ article is one of the few times a Viacom exec has admitted that part of the precipitous viewer decline at Nick a few years ago (from which it has in large part recovered) may have been its own strategy of selling content to over-the-top distributors like Netflix. "You haven't seen that cannibalization effect" president and chief exec of Viacom International Bob Bakish told the Journal. And a Viacom source tells Adweek that Nick hasn't ruled out the possibility of ad support just yet. It's getting less difficult to monetize digital content with traditional ratings measurements—Nielsen's DPR ratings product, which tracks mobile and digital viewership and ad delivery, launches this year, and the blended CPM programmers have been pushing in lieu of a real ratings metric may finally get pushed aside by something a little less jury-rigged. For parents, the new network is certainly a boon: it's an easy way to control not just the kid-friendliness but the specific content types your kid has access to on television. It's an interesting shot across Netflix's bow at a time when the streaming VOD provider is looking more threatening to kids' networks—the company's animated feature film spinoff, Turbo: FAST, premiered just three weeks ago, and it's bought a slew of kid and tween programming in recent months.

Read More

4K Is Great for Everybody Except the TV Networks

January 7, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Most of it you'll just see in the video, but Michael Bay was not able to make it through the presentation he was supposed to be giving in Las Vegas at CES 2014 because of what appeared to be a problem with the text crawl behind the audience. "The type is all off. Sorry. I'll just wing this," he said, before a brief, valiant attempt to improv his way through the introduction of Samsung's giant 105-inch curved-screen TV. Then he gave up. Video below courtesy of the quick-fingered Joshua Topolsky at the Verge . Bay later apologized, saying he'd skipped a line. He's not an improv comedian, people! Samsung's new TV will probably be the best place to watch the new season of House of Cards, as Netflix said it will definitely be streaming it in the super-duper-hi-def 4K format that was the belle of last year's CES ball. The streaming service announced partnerships with Samsung, Sony, LG and others; Amazon also announced a partnership with Samsung that includes content producers

Read More

Netflix Boosts CEO Reed Hastings Pay Package 50% in 2014 to $6 Mil

December 31, 2013  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Happy new year, Reed Hastings: The Netflix co-founder and CEO’s compensation package will climb 50% in 2014 after the company’s stock soared to record levels over the past year. Hastings, 53, will receive $3 million annual salary and $3 million in yearly stock options, Netflix disclosed in an SEC filing late Monday. That’s up from... Read more

Read More

Rdio Killed the Vdio Star

December 27, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Not even a year old, and already Vdio is taking a dirt nap. Rdio said on Friday that it is scrapping the nascent video-streaming platform with which it had hoped to take on Netflix and Hulu. “Despite our efforts, we were not able to deliver the differentiated customer experience we had hoped for, and so Vdio is now closed,” the company said in a message to users of the service. Evidently, Rdio’s bottom line has taken precedence over its dreams of becoming a global entertainment streaming platform.

Read More

The 10 Most Epic TV Show Promos of 2013

December 20, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It was a mixed bag for TV generally in 2013, but not a bad year for TV promos—in fact, some of the most inventive ads on the dial (or the Web) were from folks promoting new or returning shows. For the most part, good marketers eschewed parades of "Our show is so great!" quotes, cliffhangery snippets of dialogue and trying to unironically mimic movie trailers—and just let a few powerful images, or sometimes a single powerful image, speak to the viewer. Sometimes it was a clever in-joke, sometimes a stylish montage, sometimes the sheer chutzpah of the idea. But we picked 10 of the promos that wowed us the most from a surprisingly large pool of good creative. From edgy cable fare like Archer to a broad network series like Community, there was plenty to love before the show even started. Tell us what you think (and what we missed) in the comments.

Read More

Netflix Doesn’t Have the Market Cornered on Binge TV: Zombies + Walter White Help AMC Win the Fall VOD War

December 20, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Everyone* gets the concept of binge-viewing. And most people now associate binge-viewing with Netflix, in part because Netflix wants us to associate binge-viewing with Netflix . But if you want to gorge on episode after episode of your favorite show, you don’t necessarily have to pony up for Netflix, or for an iTunes season pass: Lots of you can watch lots of your favorite shows on your pay-TV provider’s on-demand system, for free. And many of you do. Time spent watching video on demand is increasing , even as traditional TV-watching flattens out and/or declines. Newest data point: In September and October, AMC Networks generated more video-on-demand orders than any other network, according to pay-TV tracker Rentrak. Which makes sense, because in September, AMC wrapped up its final season of “Breaking Bad,” and in October, AMC kicked off a new season of “The Walking Dead.” The breakdown: AMC generated 15 million VOD orders in September — about five percent of all VOD orders that month — and 10 million in October. VOD critics/boosters, like Time Warner CEO Jeff Bewkes , argue that those numbers could be much bigger if pay-TV providers did a better job of promoting the stuff they have, and making their TV guides and interfaces less awful. And that’s very believable

Read More

Netflix Doesn’t Have the Market Cornered on Binge TV: Zombies + Walter White Help AMC Win the Fall VOD War

December 20, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Everyone* gets the concept of binge-viewing. And most people now associate binge-viewing with Netflix, in part because Netflix wants us to associate binge-viewing with Netflix . But if you want to gorge on episode after episode of your favorite show, you don’t necessarily have to pony up for Netflix, or for an iTunes season pass: Lots of you can watch lots of your favorite shows on your pay-TV provider’s on-demand system, for free. And many of you do. Time spent watching video on demand is increasing , even as traditional TV-watching flattens out and/or declines. Newest data point: In September and October, AMC Networks generated more video-on-demand orders than any other network, according to pay-TV tracker Rentrak.

Read More