Posts Tagged ‘netflix’

Canada Getting New Video Streaming Service

August 26, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Two of Canada’s largest cable television companies are putting their differences aside and joining forces to launch a new video streaming service as the industry responds in kind to competition from online players such as Netflix. The new service, called shomi (pronounced: show me), will debut in November at a suggested retail price of $8.99 (Canadian) a month. It will be available on tablet, mobile, online, Xbox 360 and set top boxes, to Rogers and Shaw Internet and television customers. Shomi will feature prior seasons of popular television shows, as well as iconic series from the past, cult classics and fan favorite films, the two companies said in a statement. At launch, the shomi catalog will contain 11,000 hours of television shows and 1,200 movies; 30 percent of the content will be Canadian. Shomi has exclusive past-season streaming rights to a number of popular titles, including Modern Family, Sons of Anarchy, Sleepy Hollow, Vikings, New Girl, 24: Live Another Day, Chicago Fire, The Strain and American Horror Story. "We've taken the time to talk with Canadians to find out what they want and to create an unbelievable user experience," said Rogers Media president Keith Pelley. "They told us loud and clear—they want all the past seasons of the most popular, current TV shows and they want it to be easy. Shomi takes the guesswork out of finding what to watch, acting like a new-age video clerk serving up all the best content based on individual viewing habits." Netflix in particular will prove to be a formidable competitor. Although the company does not disclose how many Canadian customers it has, estimates range as high as 5.8 million. However, there’s one point in shomi’s favor: Netflix Canada’s content is considered inferior to the content available in the United States, a weakness the programmers at shomi could exploit.

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The Emmys Are Basically Fantasy Football for Network Executives

August 26, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

The Emmy Awards are a game. That doesn't mean they're worthless, or meaningless, or cynical; it just means that there is high-level strategy around who gets what award and why, beyond simply who turned in the best performance. And this year in particular, we were able to see that game being played a lot more baldly than it has been in years past. So let's take a look at said strategy, shall we? One of the reasons cable TV shows split "final" seasons into two parts is so that they'll cross years and potentially end up sweeping more than one awards season. Breaking Bad did this perfectly last night—it's difficult to argue that they didn't deserve it. Bryan Cranston, Aaron Paul, Anna Gunn, Vince Gilligan and the rest of the honorees worked on a show that is already being talked about in the same breath as The Wire and Homicide. How It's Done HBO pioneered more than daring cable content. It originated the nomination-gaming strategy, raising eyebrows and earning the consternation of broadcasters when they pulled off an unprecedented 16 nominations in 1999, including several for their brand new series, The Sopranos. It was the first time the cable world had ever landed even a single Emmy nod. This year, they got the most nominations of any network (as they have in an unbroken streak

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Hulu’s Jenny Wall Is a Pioneer of the Web Series Form

August 24, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Who Jenny Wall New gig Svp, head of marketing at Hulu Old gig Vp, marketing at Netflix Age 44 Photo: Karl J Kaul/Wonderful Machine So how did you find Hulu? I think I found Hulu in the sense that I’d been an avid Hulu user on my own—they called me in respect to some recommendations from the field. The opportunity came to me and I jumped on it immediately, and I’ve been very impressed with Mike [ Hopkins, Hulu’s new CEO ]. You’ve worked at some great places that have huge presences digitally, like HBO and Netflix. How have you seen the market change? I think the biggest thing I’ve seen is that it’s not considered “Internet TV” anymore. It’s really just entertainment you consume in a particular manner. Internet television is what we called it two years ago—everybody expected things to be Internet quality, but I had the opportunity to work on House of Cards and it was similar to what happened with HBO. And things snowballed. It took an example to show the public that something delivered through the Internet could be of high quality. It was amazing to be at HBO in those days, too, when the Sopranos and Sex and the City began. I’ve been lucky to land at two great places and now a third. How do you get the kind of reach on digital that TV enjoys? We have incredible content now that we maybe haven’t talked about as loudly as we should. Looking back at House of Cards, it was an incredibly well-produced show, it was a serialized drama, it was unlike short-form Web content.

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Netflix Hacks Up 3D Virtual-Reality Demo Using Oculus Rift (VIDEO)

August 21, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Someday, you might be able to sit down to watch Netflix’s “House of Cards” with a virtual-reality helmet strapped to your head, to see around corners and experience the political machinations in a 3D environment. Or maybe not. Whether VR is the future of entertainment — or just a passing fad — Netflix is among... Read more

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Spanish-Language Telenovela ‘Camelia la Texana’ to Premiere on Netflix

August 16, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

The hit Spanish-language telenovela “Camelia la Texana” will premiere exclusively on Netflix. Based on Los Tigres del Norte’s song “Contrabando y Traición,” the 70s-set drama follows a young, scorned woman from San Antonio (played by Mexican actress Sara Maldonado) who becomes the first queen of the drug cartels. The show was developed by Campanario Entertainment... Read more

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See How Slow Your Internet Connection Is by State

August 5, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Alas, Alaska. Also Arkansas. It's a terrible time to be living in the deep South or outside the Lower 48 if you're a web developer. At least that's what Tom Heppard over at BroadView Networks is demonstrating with this handy map. With this picture (click to see a bigger version), you can see exactly what's going on in your state. You can also take a look at a text ranking, best to worst, here .

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Dendy and Nine Raise The Stakes in Australia’s Online Video Sector

July 28, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Leaders and latecomers jostle for position ahead of Netflix's expected arrival 'Down Under'

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Do You Have to Go Overseas or Buy a Competitor to Get New Video Subscribers?

July 23, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Netflix executives practically had party hats on during their earnings call on Monday. The reason? The company topped 50 million subscribers for the first time. Comcast, meanwhile, was similarly pleased to report that it had expanded, but not by convincing new subscribers to sign on—by moving forward with its deal to acquire Time Warner Cable. Domestically, consolidation is the name of the game for traditional TV subscription services. But while techies are quick to pit hated cable companies against beloved digital video pioneers, Netflix's sub gains

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Emmy Nominations Yield Celebration — And Second-Guessing (Analysis)

July 10, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

The abundance of quality programming and expanding number of options has created a logjam for the nighttime Emmy Awards, where the celebration over which shows earned nomination will inevitably give way to plenty of second-guessing about those that were overlooked. Despite the onslaught of competition from sources such as Netflix, HBO – with its multifaceted... Read more

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Nielsen Exec: Don’t Expect to Be Impressed by Impact of Mobile TV Ratings

July 9, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Nielsen Media Research has declared itself "open for business" in terms of tracking TV viewing on smartphones, tablets and other electronic gadgets. But don’t expect those numbers, which will be available for the first time with the new fall broadcast season, to be impressive, statistically speaking. "It will start small and build gradually," Cheryl Idell, Nielsen’s evp of U.S. media, said at the semi-annual Television Critics Association conference kickoff in Beverly Hills. “We won’t see dramatic changes in ratings with this data added in.” That may not be the big splash the advertising community has been hoping for. Claire Browne, vp, director of media research at ad agency RPA in Los Angeles, described Nielsen as "behind the curve" and "playing catch-up" on measuring mobile viewing, a project that’s been in the works for years. "They have to do this to remain relevant," she said. "Consumer behavior is running so far ahead of the research." Nielsen first announced the long-gestating service last fall, promising TV networks a better cross-platform gauge of total viewers so they can set their ad rates accordingly. Advertisers are also clamoring for the data so they can strike the best media buying deals and keep up with the on-the-go consumer who’s increasingly turning to mobile devices for entertainment.

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