Posts Tagged ‘netflix’

How Millennials Consume TV Depends on Which Stage of Life They’re In

March 24, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

There's a reason that millennials are so hard for advertisers to pin down: Their media consumption is in constant flux, given that adults in that 18-34 demo are in "rapid transition." That's according to Nielsen's Q4 2015 Total Audience Report, released this morning, which delved into the media consumption habits of advertising's most elusive, and often mystifying, demographic. The report found millennials who have started a family spend significantly more time watching TV—an average of an hour per day more than those who don't have children or still live with their parents. "It's not about age, it's about life stage," wrote Glenn Enoch, evp, audience insights for Nielsen, in the report. "18-34 year olds are not a monolithic group with a common set of technologies or behaviors. Their lives are in rapid transition as they join the workforce, move into their own homes and start families." The Total Audience Report, which is not to be confused with the Total Audience Measurement ratings that Nielsen is rolling, broke millennials into three separate life stage groups: Dependent Adults (those who are living in someone else's home, usually a parent or parents), On Their Own (those who are living in their own home, with no children) and Starting a Family (those living in their own home, with children). For example, 97 percent of 18-year-olds live in someone's else home, usually a parent or parents. But 90 percent of 34-year-olds live in their own home, while 60 percent of those have children. In the middle of the demo, roughly one-third of 26- and 27-year-olds falls into each of the three life stages. Those three groups had very different media preferences during Q4 2015: Nielsen The On Their Own group is more likely than any other millennial group to have a multimedia device, high-speed internet and laptops, as well as access to an SVOD service like Netflix, Hulu or Amazon. Seventy-eight percent of On Their Own Millennials have subscription video on demand (SVOD) services like Netflix and Hulu, compared to 64 percent of Dependent Adults and 58 percent of Staring a Family. On Their Owns spent more than 94 hours using PCs, tablets and smartphones in November 2015, which was around 10 more hours than all 18-34 adults that month and 18 more hours than Dependent Adults. Starting a Family millennials are more likely to own DVRs (47 percent), DVD players (69 percent) and tablets (65 percent). That group also spends the most time at home of the three groups, and not surprisingly, it watches the most live TV (3:16 per day, in hours: minutes) and also has the most total TV screen use (4:40). The average 18-34 person spent 2:45 watching live TV each day in Q4 2015, and another 1:23 using TV-connected devices, for a total of 4:08 of TV time each day. The Starting a Family group spent 3:16 a day watching live TV, an hour more than On Their Owns (2:06), while Dependent Adults watch less live TV (2:32) and spend less time with TV overall (3:44). On Their Owns have the lowest ownership of traditional sources of video and spend the most time outside the home.

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With Its Total Audience Measurement Delayed, Nielsen Will Share More Connected TV Data

March 23, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Networks will have to wait a few months longer for full access to Nielsen's new Total Audience Measurement data, but in the interim, the company is preparing to share more information about usage of connected TV devices like Roku and Apple TV. Nielsen announced today that beginning April 25, it will make brand-level data available from connected TV devices, including streaming video devices and game consoles—Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, Google Chromecast, Xbox, Sony PlayStation and Nintendo Wii—as well as enabled smart TVs. This will allow clients to track how many homes across the country own TV connected devices and which brands, and how those numbers grow over time. Clients will be able to determine how much time people spend with devices overall and link program viewing to those specific devices. The company is also creating a new metric called Total Use of Television (TUT), which adds connected TV usage to linear usage for what Nielsen calls "a complete view" of TV usage. "Our device breakout data will report how much viewing to a particular network, program, episode or telecast came from a particular device type or device brand for measured content," said Sara Erichson, evp, client solutions and audience insights.

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How FX Bids for New Series Without the Big Budget of Netflix

March 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As streaming services like Netflix, Amazon and Hulu snap up original series away from linear networks, as well as lure creators with big paydays and promises of creative autonomy, their competitors have had to alter their approaches to bidding for new projects. One of those is FX, which lost out on the bidding for Aziz Ansari's comedy Master of None and the upcoming drama The Crown. Both of those shows went to Netflix after the streaming service "overwhelmed us with shock and awe levels of money and commitment," FX CEO John Landgraf told reporters in January . He also used a "Moneyball" analogy when comparing FX to Netflix, explaining, "Basically, we're competing against payrolls, if you will, a la the Oakland A's and New York Yankees, that are three or four times ours." Because he can't match Netflix dollar for dollar, Landgraf has shifted the focus of his pitches, highlighting other attributes of the network when bidding for shows. Landgraf highlights his marketing team, which has been named PromaxBDA's In-House Marketing Team of the Year for five consecutive years. "I think the talent appreciates that," he told Adweek. Landgraf also emphasizes the personal touch and attention he can give FX's shows versus Netflix, which now has 100 series in the pipeline—55 for adults, 45 for children. "Our network is more of a bespoke organization than a factory. We're at about 18 shows, and that's the most that I can personally pay attention to," said Landgraf. While he could maybe do as many as 20, "I'm at the max in terms of being able to read scripts, watch rough cuts, have a thoughtful input and dialogue." And that's important, even when the network doesn't have much creative feedback in terms of notes for producers. Landgraf said that his deal with Louis CK for Louie specified that the network wasn't able to give him notes.

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Taiwan’s Catchplay Launches Asian Movie Streaming Service

March 22, 2016  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Taiwan-based film distributor and producer, Catchplay is launching a video-streaming service that it hopes will take on Netflix in Asia.

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ABC and Warner Bros.’ New Deal Will Make Binge Watching Easier

March 17, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Networks and studios have been battling for years over stacking rights—the ability to offer in-season episodes via on demand or network streaming—but a new agreement from ABC and Warner Bros. Television Group signals those conflicts could be coming to an end. ABC Entertainment and Warner Bros. Television Group struck a stacking rights deal covering any series produce by Warner Bros. that debuts on ABC in the 2016-17 and 2017-18 seasons. The agreement enables ABC to offer all episodes of its Warner Bros. series launched during the next two seasons on its VOD platforms like ABC.com and Hulu, as well as VOD on MVPD partners like cable and satellite. In doing so, viewers will be able to to binge the entire current season of the show, instead of being restricted to only the last five episodes, as is currently the case for most series. Warner Bros. will retain end-of-season SVOD rights, early syndication rights, early DVD rights and day-after electronic sell-through rights to companies like iTunes. "This is a real win for network television viewers," said Jana Winograde, evp of business operations for ABC Entertainment, in a statement

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How Commercial-Free Series Premieres Are Paying Off for Cable Networks

March 8, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

This winter, something big has been missing from the new series premieres on TBS, Syfy and WGN America: advertisements. Syfy aired a commercial-free sneak peek of The Magicians in December, while TBS rolled out the entire first season of comedy Angie Tribeca during a 25-hour "binge-a-thon" in January, with no ads during the episodes (local ads played between episodes, along with content sponsored by Dunkin' Donuts and Intuit's TurboTax). And WGN America opted to forego ads for the series premieres of its two winter dramas: Outsiders in January and Underground on March 9. With 412 scripted series and around 750 unscripted series flooding networks and streaming services last year, networks need to pull out all the stops to break through the clutter and entice audiences to take a chance on their new programming. "We're obviously an ad-supported network and our advertising partners are really important to us, but for me, nothing is more important than the shows launching successfully," said Matt Cherniss, president and gm, WGN America and Tribune Studios, who weighed "the short-term experience of how much money you might generate off one episode of television versus the long-term of keeping an audience involved and getting them hooked on a show to the extent that they're going to come back for weeks two, three, four and beyond." This approach, the network hopes, will avoid the audience inertia that doomed Manhattan , its critically acclaimed, yet recently canceled, drama. It's not just new series that are foregoing advertising. On Feb. 29, National Geographic Channel premiered He Named Me Malala, the 2015 documentary about Pakistani teen activist Malala Yousafzai, without ads (it was sponsored by Geico, which aired a spot before the film). Courteney Monroe, CEO, National Geographic Global Networks, said she'll continue that going forward. "If a project merits treating it differently or finding some alternative business model, we'll do that," she said. Before The Magicians, the last time an ad-free episode aired in prime time on any broadcast or basic cable was 2012 when NBC previewed its comedies Go On and Animal Practice during Summer Olympics coverage. But with audiences increasingly accustomed to watching content without ad interruptions on HBO, Netflix and Amazon, networks are trying to replicate that experience to attract viewers. Buyers, too, see the value in sacrificing short-term exposure for long-term gains. "We're willing to sacrifice whatever benefit we're going to get out of that one episode if we can get the next Walking Dead," said David Campanelli, svp, director of national broadcast for Horizon Media

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YouTube Star PewDiePie Can Now Win a Primetime TV Emmy

March 2, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

PewDiePie already boasts the largest following on YouTube, and now the popular creator could add another accomplishment to his list: an Emmy award. Today the Television Academy announced it has expanded and redefined many short-form categories for this year's Primetime Emmys. The Academy added three awards: Outstanding Short Form Series, Variety; Outstanding Individual Actor in a Short Form Series; and Outstanding Individual Actress in a Short Form Series. The Academy also renamed the Short Format Live Entertainment category as Outstanding Short Form Series, Comedy or Drama; and Short Format Nonfiction is now Outstanding Short Form Series, Reality/Nonfiction. The Academy defines a short-form series as having a minimum of six episodes that average 15 minutes or less. "Our industry is aggressively, quickly and creatively evolving the various ways episodic stories are told," said TV Academy chairman and CEO Bruce Rosenblum. "These category changes reflect the broader opportunities that emerging networks and distribution platforms, such as Maker Studios, Fullscreen, Crackle, AwesomenessTV, YouTube Red, Adult Swim and others, are seizing in choosing innovative formats that enable our television community to share stories in novel and entertaining ways." While the big streaming players like Netflix, Amazon and Hulu have qualified for TV Emmy nominations—and have won many—other digital players that don't have the budget for 30- or 60-minute episodes have largely been ignored. Until now, if a digital short longed for a prize, it would have to vie for a Webby or Streamy, which are based on fan votes.

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To Thrive in the Era of Peak TV, HBO Is Turning Subscribers Into ‘Addicts’

February 11, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Are you hooked on HBO? The network sure hopes so. As the premium service competes with an ever-growing number of broadcast, cable and digital competitors, including streaming services like Netflix, the network has developed an interesting approach to keeping subscribers coming back for more each month: turning them into "addicts," according to HBO CEO Richard Plepler. HBO has 32.3 million U.S. subscribers as of the third quarter of 2015, according to SNL Kagan. Time Warner doesn't release HBO-specific figures but said Wednesday that HBO and Cinemax added 2.7 million subscribers in 2015

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YouTube Debuts First Original Content but Won’t Say How Many Subscribed to Service

February 10, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

YouTube Red launched last October , but the paid version of the popular video platform is getting its close-up today, debuting its first four original shows. As with any new subscription service in its early days, YouTube would not share specifics on subscriber numbers. Though, one of its most influential creators, Hank Green, ran an informal Twitter poll Monday to gauge how many people were actually paying $10 a month for ad-free content and YouTube's music service—and the numbers weren't promising. Are you a paying YouTube Red user? — Hank Green (@hankgreen) February 8, 2016 Green followed up that tweet with one today showing how Red is affecting the bottom line of existing channels: If you would like to check to see how YouTube Red is affecting your channel earnings, I have created a spreadsheet: https://t.co/eUuUUxQ4OZ — Hank Green (@hankgreen) February 10, 2016 Unlike bigger subscription services like Netflix, Hulu and Amazon, YouTube isn't banking on how many subscribers it can sign up.

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The X-Files Tackles Its Toughest Case Yet: Reviving TV Revivals

January 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Last fall, the broadcast networks bet that the best way to attract viewers was by programming reboots and revivals of popular series and movies. However, Limitless, Minority Report, The Muppets and Heroes Reborn had limited success at reigniting that spark with audiences. Limitless is a hit for CBS. But Fox's Minority Report and NBC's Heroes Reborn won't be returning for Season 2, and ABC is retooling The Muppets in an attempt to win back viewers who were driven away by its more adult tone. Last August, NBC scrapped its straight-to-series revival of '90s sitcom Coach after shooting just one episode. That's because some networks are bringing brands out of mothballs for all the wrong reasons. "I think reboots are a dangerous thing

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