Posts Tagged ‘netflix’

Millennials Are Watching More TV on Hulu This Fall and Less When Shows First Air

November 20, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Millennials are still watching new episodes of television shows this fall—it's just taking them longer than ever to do so. Adults ages 18 to 34 are increasingly turning away from live TV to time-shift programming on platforms like Hulu, according to new insights from data technology and research firm Symphony Advanced Media (SymphonyAM). The study, which looked at fall season programming through Nov. 1, found that millennials are only watching live TV 30 percent of the time. They're also spending 30 percent of their time watching programs outside of Nielsen's live-plus-3 and live-plus-7 measurements, including OTT programming, VOD beyond three days after an episode's premiere and DVR more than seven days after a show airs.

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Ad of the Day: Netflix Shows You the Consequences of Being the Worst Kind of Rat

November 18, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

You've seen this kind of torture scene before. A man sits bound to a chair, preparing to feel unimaginable pain after crossing a line with his tough-guy boss. He seems to have leaked some sensitive information—or even informed on the guy. Whatever his particular transgressions, he's about to see what it's like to be shoved into a pit of rats while doused in honey. That's the setup of this new Netflix ad from TBWAChiatDay in Los Angeles. And it's one of those spots that's better to enjoy spoiler-free, before someone, like a dirty rat, tells you the ending.

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‘Canceled’ is a Dirty Word This Fall, but Buyers Aren’t Panicking

November 9, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Each year, a few familiar touchstones mark the passage of fall: trees shedding their leaves, the end of Daylight Saving Time and the ritual cancelation of broadcast's lowest-rated new shows. Yet for the first time in more than 15 years, the networks made it to November without pulling the plug on a single new series. Several freshman shows are rating a paltry 0.6 or 0.7 in adults 18-49, but instead of cancelling them as usual, networks are keeping them on the air and reducing their 13-episode orders. Fox trimmed Minority Report's count to 10, while ABC did the same with Blood and Oil. NBC cut Truth Be Told's order to 10 and took The Player down to 9.

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In the Age of Cord Cutting, Nielsen Plots Its Overhaul of TV’s Outdated Ad Metrics

October 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It's been nine years since networks and advertisers agreed on the eligibility criteria for C3 and C7 TV ratings, but given the seismic shifts in the industry since then, it feels more like 90 years. In 2006, iPhones, tablets, OTT and connected TV devices like Roku didn't even exist; networks had just begun to experiment with streaming full episodes online (Hulu and Netflix streaming were still a year away); DVRs resided in less than 10 percent of homes; and YouTube, not yet owned by Google, was in its infancy. But in our modern world of streaming, time shifting and cord cutting, "more and more, those ratings are not resembling what is actually going on in terms of consumer exposure to those assets," said Megan Clarken, evp, global watch product leadership for Nielsen. But not for long: Nielsen is trying to overhaul the industry's outdated ad metrics by next year's upfront. On Oct. 15, the company assembled 25 top execs—including network ad sales and buying chiefs—to start discussions about transitioning to a new set of criteria. Some attendees were surprised to learn that the current C3 and C7 definitions—which exclude any viewing where the ad load isn't identical to the linear telecast (i.e., almost any streaming), as well as all DVR and VOD viewing beyond the seventh day after it airs—are constrained not by Nielsen's technical capabilities, but by that 2006 industrywide agreement. "Nielsen can measure a lot more than they're given credit for, but the definition is what it is, so they're hamstrung by that, and we all have to go along with it," said David Campanelli, svp, director of national broadcast for Horizon Media. Nielsen's efforts were prompted by its upcoming total audience measurement tool, which the company shared exclusively with Adweek last week. Two years in development, total audience measurement offers what networks and buyers have spent years asking for: the ability to account for a program's consumption across all platforms (including linear, DVR, VOD, OTT, mobile, tablets, PCs, digital publishers like YouTube and connected devices like Roku and Xbox), while aligning the disparate metrics for linear and video content. Nielsen will begin sharing data with its clients in December and roll out the tool's full capabilities early next year. At last week's meeting, the company discussed "the next iteration of C3 and C7," said Clarken, as well as "a shift toward a complete change in the currency," a more complete overhaul of the current system, using Nielsen's total audience measurement. "It's important for us to understand how this thing is going to evolve over time, not just tomorrow but in future years," said Clarken. Among the challenges in changing metrics: While program and commercial ratings were essentially identical for linear TV, those numbers diverge in a linear world where because of ad targeting, audiences for the same show are receiving different ads. "The needs of the network to prove success of a show and the need of an advertiser to deliver impressions start to be two different things," said Campanelli. "C3, C7 and C30 is a horizontal view of things, and I think we need to start looking at things more vertically, and how many total impressions across different formats can ABC deliver my advertiser on Wednesday night, rather than in the Modern Family spot across 30 days." By mid-November, Nielsen will next bring together the researchers who routinely analyze the ratings data for the first meeting's attendees, before assembling both groups for a third meeting.

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What You Need to Know About YouTube’s Subscription Service, YouTube Red

October 21, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

YouTube unveiled its long-awaited subscription service today at an event at its YouTube Space in Los Angeles. Dubbed YouTube Red, the advertising-free option will go live one week from today, Oct. 28, across mobile phones, tablets, desktops and connected TVs. Here's what you need to know about the new service: YouTube Red won't affect the free, ad-supported version YouTube Red is meant to be additive. Users can sign up to be Red members with their existing accounts. Think of it as a pay wall, another way for YouTube to add to Google's bottom line. YouTube's ad business is still strong: The number of advertisers has grown 40 percent over the past year, with the top 100 advertisers increasing their average spend by 60 percent year over year. This puts YouTube in competition with SVOD players YouTube is banking on obsessive users to plop down $9.99 a month ($12.99 if you're an Apple user) to be liberated from ads. Here's how that price compares to other subscription streaming players: Netflix: $8.99 Hulu: $7.99, or $11.99 for the ad-free option Amazon Prime: $99 per year (about $8.25 per month) HBO Now: $14.99 Showtime: $10.99 YouTube Red will give scripted shows to its unscripted stars When YouTube hired Suzanne Daniels from MTV to head up its original programming efforts, it signaled it was serious about upgrading from its millions of hours of user-generated videos. YouTube is rolling out a slate of original content that will be exclusive only to YouTube Red subscribers. Some of the platform's biggest creators, including PewDiePie, Lilly Singh, The Fine Bros. and Toby Turner, are among the YouTube stars producing scripted series for Red. The shows will begin to roll out early next year. YouTube will pay out the majority of the revenue it gets from its subscriptions to its partners. Roughly 98 percent of its creators have signed on for Red. Subscribers also have the option of saving videos and watch them offline. YouTube Red subscribers get access to a new version of YouTube music YouTube Red evolved from Music Key , a YouTube subscription service that launched in beta in November 2014.

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7 Shocking Character Deaths on Walking Dead, and Where the Actors Went Next

October 9, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As fans of AMC's The Walking Dead know, the popular series has chewed its way through a rotating cast of characters who get killed off each season (this is a zombie apocalypse, after all). As the ratings behemoth gets set to return for its sixth season on Sunday, here are some of the most notable actors whose characters did not survive. It probably goes without saying, but there are big spoilers ahead for anyone who isn't caught up: Shane Walsh Played by: Jon Bernthal Who he was : The best friend and right-hand man of Rick Grimes (Andrew Lincoln), until the two clashed over how to lead the group of survivors. (There was also that whole issue of Walsh having an affair with Grimes' wife, Lori). How he died : As Walsh became more of a psychopath, his former best friend fatally stabbed him. The Season 2 stunner also led to one of the biggest reveals of the entire series: You don't have to be bitten by a zombie to turn into one after you die. Before appearing on The Walking Dead : Primarily a stage actor, he landed a starring role on the one-season sitcom The Class, created by Friends co-creator David Crane. Since leaving The Walking Dead : He's appeared in Hollywood hits The Wolf of Wall Street and Fury, and starred in TNT's short-lived Mob City. Next year, Bernthal will return to the comic book world when he portrays The Punisher on the second season of Netflix's Daredevil. Lori Grimes Played by: Sarah Wayne Callies Who she was : A survivor of the outbreak, Lori was the wife of Rick Grimes and mother of Carl and Judith. How she died : She died after giving birth. In a cruel twist of fate, her son Carl had to shoot her in the head to prevent her from returning as a zombie. Before appearing on The Walking Dead : She landed her first television role in 2003 as Kate O'Malley in the short-lived CBS show Queens Supreme. She also played Detective Jane Porter on The WB's Tarzan

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As Live TV Viewing Declines, How Can Networks Fully Monetize Their Viewers?

October 6, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

For years, NBCUniversal's ratings guru Alan Wurtzel has been criticizing the deficiencies of Nielsen's current ratings system—he says as much as 35 percent of NBC's audience for an average episode isn't measured by Nielsen's C3 and C7 metrics, which don't include most streaming activity, particularly on mobile and tablets—and he's tired of it. "The time for just whining about this is over," said Wurtzel, NBCUniversal's president of research and media development. "We really need to get proactive." As live TV viewing continues to decline—in the first week of the new TV season, three broadcast networks suffered double-digit drops in adults 18-49 versus a year ago: Fox (20 percent), ABC (19 percent) and NBC (10 percent)—networks and buyers have intensified their pleas for a new metric to accurately measure viewing across all platforms, and their cries are finally being heard. "One of the key elements of any ability to monetize is you need measurement," said Charles Buchwalter, president and CEO of Symphony Advanced Media. "If you can't measure it, you can't sell it." Symphony is one of several companies diving into the ratings fray this fall, unveiling new multiplatform tools that they hope will allow them to edge out Nielsen as the new industry standard. Symphony's VideoPulse, a cloud-based service that captures live media usage by individuals across several platforms (including VOD, OTT, Web, mobile, gaming devices, DVR and linear TV), is currently being beta tested by major media companies like NBCUniversal and Viacom. "This market has been moving very quickly over a short period, and being able to use older methodologies to capture this new behavior is very difficult," said Buchwalter. "It very well could be that you just need new approaches to capture this." Wurtzel likes what he sees so far from VideoPulse: "It's very early days there, but it looks to me like this is the first viable alternative I've seen to measure cross-platform." But Symphony isn't the only company looking to become the next Nielsen. ComScore recently introduced Xmedia, which combines TV and digital audience metrics, and mounted an even more aggressive challenge last week by announcing plans to acquire rival Rentrak. In the deal, which is expected to close early next year, the companies will join forces and take on Nielsen for ratings measurement supremacy. However, Nielsen isn't going down without a fight in the struggle for multiplatform metrics. The company is preparing to unveil its total audience measurement, which Nielsen says will introduce "like-for-like" metrics for digital and video—including SVOD providers like Netflix, which have refused to share any ratings metrics for years—by year's end.

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This New Measurement Tool Shows Millennials Are Watching as Much TV as Anyone

September 22, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As the new TV season kicks off with 22 new shows debuting over the next month, networks and advertisers will begin to make sense of which series are clicking with viewers and which ones will get axed. But in the current TV marketplace of fragmented viewership, networks have been complaining that Nielsen no longer provides an adequate measurement of who's really watching their shows. "We're not getting measured accurately and were losing a lot of people," said Alan Wurtzel, NBCUniversal's president of research and media development, during an industry meeting this morning. Wurtzel estimated that 15 percent to 35 percent of viewers who watch on other platforms are not getting counted. "And it's only growing," he added. VideoPulse, which was unveiled this morning, is a new TV multiplatform measurement tool from Symphony Advanced Media looking to finally crack that code. It's a cloud-based service that captures live media usage by individuals across OTT, VOD, Web, mobile, gaming devices, DVR and linear TV. Data comes from the 15,000 users who have already signed up to be tracked; Symphony hopes to have 50,000 within the next year. The data VideoPulse has already gathered goes against the idea that millennials aren't watching TV—they just aren't watching the way previous generations did. According to traditional TV measurement from Nielsen, millennial viewing has dropped 30 percent over the past five years. But VideoPulse found that 25 percent of viewing among millennials is on DVRs and over-the-top services and happens outside the Live+7 window, not measured by Nielsen. "There has been a significant void in understanding how consumers are using nontraditional media platforms, but innovation has finally arrived in the media-measurement space," said Charles Buchwalter, president and CEO of Symphony Advanced Media. Buchwalter says the product will "track the cross-media, cross-platform behavior of consumers in the fastest growing mode of TV and video viewing, allowing the market to extend beyond the current industry-accepted norm of Live viewing plus seven days ratings." The product—which is available immediately for advertisers, agencies and media companies—is already undergoing beta testing by NBC, Viacom, Warner Bros. Media Research and A+E Networks. "Our industry has been disadvantaged by legacy-measurement approaches that have failed to evolve with consumers' increasing use of media platforms," said Liz Huszarik, evp, Warner Bros. Media Research & Insights. "We are hopeful that by working with Symphony Advanced Media's VideoPulse that we can capture an accurate picture of consumers' total TV/video usage across platforms and devices with a transparency that's been missing from other vendors." VideoPulse also includes data from streaming services—most notably Netflix—which so far hasn't been divulged

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A French Company Is About to Become America’s 4th Largest Cable Provider

September 17, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

After 42 years, the Dolan family will no longer control Cablevision. The New York-based cable operator announced this morning it has agreed to sell to Altice Group, a European telecom company controlled by French cable entrepreneur Patrick Drahi. Altice will pay $34.90 a share, making the deal worth $17.7 billion including debt. The acquisition also includes Newsday Media Group, publisher of Newsday and amNewYork, but does not include the Madison Square Garden Company, which owns the namesake arena and the New York Knicks and New York Rangers. It's the second U.S. deal for Altice this year. The company announced plans to acquire Suddenlink Communications, which operates in 17 midwestern and southern states, in May. Cablevision, which predominately serves the New York metro area and Long Island, has about 3.1 million subscribers. Altice says that with Suddenlink and Cablevision combined, it will be the fourth largest U.S. cable provider, behind Comcast, Charter and Time Warner Cable (the latter two of which are attempting to merge). "The deal underscores the increasingly global nature of premium video content and distribution, a trend that is also illustrated by the international growth path that Netflix is on," said Eric Schmitt, evp of TV and media at cross-channel marketing firm Allant. This morning's deal caps a frenzied two years of cable consolidation as subscribers continue to drop cable in favor of going over the top—Cablevision lost 16,000 cable homes in the second quarter while adding 14,000 Internet-only customers. And that's not going to make customers who are increasingly dissatisfied with their cable service any happier, notes Stephen Beck, founder and managing partner of management consultancy cg42. "Cablevision was not as bad from a brand vulnerability perspective as a Comcast or Time Warner, but they had substantial frustrations that customers were experiencing," said Beck, who has found 33 percent of cable customers are not happy with their service. "The frustration rates are higher than any category that we've studied," he said. "Will nontraditional players and OTT providers continue to benefit from the soup of misery that the cable companies seem to want to create for their customers?" Altice has invested heavily in broadband and Internet services for its other global operations. With Cablevision and Suddenlink, it hopes to have the heft to keep what it pays for programming in check. Schmitt said the heat is already high on networks, and this deal could bring it closer to a boiling point; Suddenlink dropped Viacom's channels earlier this year when the two couldn't come to carriage terms.

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Fullscreen Finally Admits It’s Launching a Subscription Service

September 16, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Following months of rumors, Fullscreen has let the cat of the bag—it's launching its own subscription service. Though Fullscreen had been working on the service, simply called Fullscreen, for months, this is the first time the multichannel network has publicly talked about it. In a blog post announcing the service, CEO George Strompolos said the goal was to "bridge the gap between social media and television for youth audiences." Fullscreen did not provide much detail about the upcoming service and made no mention of price or a potential launch date—though it likely won't happen until next year. The company did not say if the paid service will include ads, but it is expected that branded content will be a part of the platform. (The company recently acquired McBeard , a social media content studio that supports major brands across platforms.) Fullscreen did say the subscription product would feature series exclusive to the platform—including Grace Helbig and Hannah Hart's upcoming reboot of Sid and Marty Krofft's Electra Woman and Dyna Girl—and would also look to develop other formats like podcasts and editorial content. Fullscreen will also house documentaries The Outfield and #O2LForever and the upcoming Paul Scheer-Jonathan Stern teen parody series. The announcement comes at a time when content creators, especially multichannel networks, are looking for greater ownership and control of their content

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