Posts Tagged ‘netflix’

The X-Files Tackles Its Toughest Case Yet: Reviving TV Revivals

January 22, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Last fall, the broadcast networks bet that the best way to attract viewers was by programming reboots and revivals of popular series and movies. However, Limitless, Minority Report, The Muppets and Heroes Reborn had limited success at reigniting that spark with audiences. Limitless is a hit for CBS. But Fox's Minority Report and NBC's Heroes Reborn won't be returning for Season 2, and ABC is retooling The Muppets in an attempt to win back viewers who were driven away by its more adult tone. Last August, NBC scrapped its straight-to-series revival of '90s sitcom Coach after shooting just one episode. That's because some networks are bringing brands out of mothballs for all the wrong reasons. "I think reboots are a dangerous thing

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Discovery Will Try to Capitalize on People’s Sudden Obsession With ‘Making a Murderer’

January 7, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

As the country's enthusiasm for Netflix's Making a Murderer continues to grow, Investigation Discovery is jumping on the bandwagon, fast-tracking a special on Steven Avery, the man whose case is the focus of the riveting true-crime series. "As the country's most experienced true-crime network, we feel compelled to address what we believe are missing from the case as presented in Netflix's current documentary series, Making a Murderer," Henry Schlieff, group president for Investigation Discovery, American Heroes Channel and Destination America, said at the Television Critics Association's winter press tour. Investigation Discovery has partnered with Peacock Productions (a division of NBC News) to produce a special, Front Page: The Steven Avery Story, which started production this week and will air later in January. Hosted by Dateline NBC correspondent Keith Morrison, the program is "an attempt to provide critical, crucial evidence and testimonies that answer many of the questions surrounding Steven Avery," said Schlieff. Making a Murderer, which Netflix released Dec. 18, has left the country buzzing about Avery, who along with his nephew, was convicted of murdering photographer Teresa Halbach. Avery had previously served 18 years in prison for rape when he was released in 2003 after DNA evidence exonerated him. He was arrested and convicted of Halbach's murder two years later, after he had filed a civil suit over his false conviction. More than 360,000 people have signed online petitions calling for Avery's pardon as a result of Making a Murderer, which raises serious questions about the case against Avery. A year ago, Investigation Discovery quickly developed its own true-crime podcast to take advantage of the frenzy around the first season of Serial. But ID isn't the only Discovery network looking to get in on the true-crime craze sparked by Making a Murderer, Serial and HBO's The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst. On Tuesday, Discovery launched its first true-crime series, Killing Fields, which the network said is shot in "real time" as an investigation unfolds. Executive produced by Barry Levinson, the show follows a cold case from June 1997 in Iberville Parish, La., where a Louisiana State University graduate student, Eugenie Boisfontaine, disappeared. Her body was discovered two months later. Detective Rodie Sanchez, who was assigned to the case in 1997, has come out of retirement and reopened the case. In Killing Fields, he is paired with a younger detective, Aubrey St. Angelo, as they reinvestigate the murder.

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Netflix’s Content Chief Just Perfectly Summarized How the TV Industry’s Been Broken Since Birth

January 6, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Netflix execs had a lot to say at the streaming giant's CES keynote today, but amid all the flashy trailers and big global news, one compelling tidbit was largely overlooked. CEO Reed Hastings was clearly the star of the show, where he announced Netflix's sudden surge into more than 130 new countries today. But also on stage was chief content officer Ted Sarandos, who talked not only about Netflix's popular programming but also about the company's role as a consumer advocate of sorts. Here's how Sarandos beautifully summarized the profits-first, viewers-second mentality that has frequently driven decision making in Hollywood and across the entertainment and broadcast industries: "Over the last 70 years, consumers have been at the mercy of others when it comes to television. The shows and movies they want to watch are subject to business models that they do not understand and they do not care about. All they know is frustration

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Yahoo Shutters Screen, Scales Back Original Series

January 4, 2016  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just four days into 2016, Yahoo is making good on a plans announced at the end of 2015. The struggling tech giant has shut down Yahoo Screen, a 5-year-old digital video platform that housed its original series, its first livestream of an NFL game, and old episodes of Saturday Night Live. The remaining video properties on Yahoo Screen will be moved to the company's digital magazines, so like-minded content will exist side by side. "At Yahoo, we're constantly reviewing and iterating on our products as we strive to create the best user experience," said a Yahoo rep. "With that in mind, video content from Yahoo as well as our partners has been transitioned from Yahoo Screen to our Digital Magazine properties so users can discover complementary content in one place." The shutdown of Yahoo Screen, first reported by Variety, comes after a year in which the tech giant attempted to break into original content with the revival of NBC sitcom Community, the NBA-themed series Sin City Saints, and sci-fi comedy Other Space (from Ghostbusters director Paul Feig). It's a blow to the tumultuous tenure of CEO Marissa Mayer, for whom original video had been a priority. Despite the three original series, as well as a licensing deal with Viacom for Comedy Central shows and the entire catalogue of Saturday Night Live, Yahoo simply couldn't compete with streaming giants Netflix, Amazon Prime and even Hulu. Yahoo's originals contributed to a $42 million write down for the company last year. CFO Ken Goldman admitted at the time he "couldn't see a way to make money over time" on pricey original series

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The Today Show’s Willie Geist Shares His Not-So-Guilty Viewing Pleasures

December 15, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Specs Age 40 Claim to fame Co-host of the third hour of NBC's Today and co-host of MSNBC's Morning Joe Base New York Twitter @WillieGeist Adweek: What's the first information you consume in the morning? Willie Geist: The first information when I wake up at 4 a.m. is an email from our producers that summarizes the things that happened overnight and things we should look for this morning. But then I go right to Twitter. I follow so many people and news organizations from left, right, middle. I treat Twitter like a news ticker, basically. Then I click on my newspaper apps, go through The Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, New York Times, then I'll get a little deeper into it with Politico or Bloomberg Politics. What other social media platforms do you use? I use Instagram a good bit, but I use it less as a news source than just for posting and looking at images. Who do you follow? Mindy Kaling is always fun. I admire people like her who are so committed to Instagram that they'll be in a moment and still take a picture and get it up online. It's not purely promotional; you're actually following her life.

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Streaming Services, and Mr. Robot, Elbow Broadcasters Out of Golden Globes Nominations

December 10, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If last year's Golden Globe Awards heralded the streaming services' arrival as major television players, this year's list of nominees shows streaming networks have suddenly become the dominant forces. Netflix led all TV networks with 8 nominations , while Amazon had 5 and Hulu landed its first nomination. Those picks came at the expense of the broadcast networks, which managed just 11 nominations in all—4 for ABC, 4 for Fox, 2 for The CW and 1 for CBS—while NBC, which will broadcast the Golden Globes on Sunday, Jan. 10, was shut out completely. (NBC's cable sibling, USA, landed three nominations for Mr. Robot.) The streaming services accounted for four of the six shows nominated for best TV series, musical or comedy: Casual (Hulu), Mozart in the Jungle (Amazon), Orange is the New Black (Netflix) and last year's winner, Transparent (Amazon). The other two nominees were for HBO shows Silicon Valley and Veep. No broadcast TV series made the list. On the best drama side, a single broadcast show—Fox's Empire—made the cut. It will compete with three cable shows (HBO's Game of Thrones, USA's Mr. Robot and Starz's Outlander) and one Netflix series (Narcos)

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Millennials Are Watching More TV on Hulu This Fall and Less When Shows First Air

November 20, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Millennials are still watching new episodes of television shows this fall—it's just taking them longer than ever to do so. Adults ages 18 to 34 are increasingly turning away from live TV to time-shift programming on platforms like Hulu, according to new insights from data technology and research firm Symphony Advanced Media (SymphonyAM). The study, which looked at fall season programming through Nov. 1, found that millennials are only watching live TV 30 percent of the time. They're also spending 30 percent of their time watching programs outside of Nielsen's live-plus-3 and live-plus-7 measurements, including OTT programming, VOD beyond three days after an episode's premiere and DVR more than seven days after a show airs.

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Ad of the Day: Netflix Shows You the Consequences of Being the Worst Kind of Rat

November 18, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

You've seen this kind of torture scene before. A man sits bound to a chair, preparing to feel unimaginable pain after crossing a line with his tough-guy boss. He seems to have leaked some sensitive information—or even informed on the guy. Whatever his particular transgressions, he's about to see what it's like to be shoved into a pit of rats while doused in honey. That's the setup of this new Netflix ad from TBWAChiatDay in Los Angeles. And it's one of those spots that's better to enjoy spoiler-free, before someone, like a dirty rat, tells you the ending.

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‘Canceled’ is a Dirty Word This Fall, but Buyers Aren’t Panicking

November 9, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Each year, a few familiar touchstones mark the passage of fall: trees shedding their leaves, the end of Daylight Saving Time and the ritual cancelation of broadcast's lowest-rated new shows. Yet for the first time in more than 15 years, the networks made it to November without pulling the plug on a single new series. Several freshman shows are rating a paltry 0.6 or 0.7 in adults 18-49, but instead of cancelling them as usual, networks are keeping them on the air and reducing their 13-episode orders. Fox trimmed Minority Report's count to 10, while ABC did the same with Blood and Oil. NBC cut Truth Be Told's order to 10 and took The Player down to 9.

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In the Age of Cord Cutting, Nielsen Plots Its Overhaul of TV’s Outdated Ad Metrics

October 26, 2015  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

It's been nine years since networks and advertisers agreed on the eligibility criteria for C3 and C7 TV ratings, but given the seismic shifts in the industry since then, it feels more like 90 years. In 2006, iPhones, tablets, OTT and connected TV devices like Roku didn't even exist; networks had just begun to experiment with streaming full episodes online (Hulu and Netflix streaming were still a year away); DVRs resided in less than 10 percent of homes; and YouTube, not yet owned by Google, was in its infancy. But in our modern world of streaming, time shifting and cord cutting, "more and more, those ratings are not resembling what is actually going on in terms of consumer exposure to those assets," said Megan Clarken, evp, global watch product leadership for Nielsen. But not for long: Nielsen is trying to overhaul the industry's outdated ad metrics by next year's upfront. On Oct. 15, the company assembled 25 top execs—including network ad sales and buying chiefs—to start discussions about transitioning to a new set of criteria. Some attendees were surprised to learn that the current C3 and C7 definitions—which exclude any viewing where the ad load isn't identical to the linear telecast (i.e., almost any streaming), as well as all DVR and VOD viewing beyond the seventh day after it airs—are constrained not by Nielsen's technical capabilities, but by that 2006 industrywide agreement. "Nielsen can measure a lot more than they're given credit for, but the definition is what it is, so they're hamstrung by that, and we all have to go along with it," said David Campanelli, svp, director of national broadcast for Horizon Media. Nielsen's efforts were prompted by its upcoming total audience measurement tool, which the company shared exclusively with Adweek last week. Two years in development, total audience measurement offers what networks and buyers have spent years asking for: the ability to account for a program's consumption across all platforms (including linear, DVR, VOD, OTT, mobile, tablets, PCs, digital publishers like YouTube and connected devices like Roku and Xbox), while aligning the disparate metrics for linear and video content. Nielsen will begin sharing data with its clients in December and roll out the tool's full capabilities early next year. At last week's meeting, the company discussed "the next iteration of C3 and C7," said Clarken, as well as "a shift toward a complete change in the currency," a more complete overhaul of the current system, using Nielsen's total audience measurement. "It's important for us to understand how this thing is going to evolve over time, not just tomorrow but in future years," said Clarken. Among the challenges in changing metrics: While program and commercial ratings were essentially identical for linear TV, those numbers diverge in a linear world where because of ad targeting, audiences for the same show are receiving different ads. "The needs of the network to prove success of a show and the need of an advertiser to deliver impressions start to be two different things," said Campanelli. "C3, C7 and C30 is a horizontal view of things, and I think we need to start looking at things more vertically, and how many total impressions across different formats can ABC deliver my advertiser on Wednesday night, rather than in the Modern Family spot across 30 days." By mid-November, Nielsen will next bring together the researchers who routinely analyze the ratings data for the first meeting's attendees, before assembling both groups for a third meeting.

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