Posts Tagged ‘netflix’

Do You Have to Go Overseas or Buy a Competitor to Get New Video Subscribers?

July 23, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Netflix executives practically had party hats on during their earnings call on Monday. The reason? The company topped 50 million subscribers for the first time. Comcast, meanwhile, was similarly pleased to report that it had expanded, but not by convincing new subscribers to sign on—by moving forward with its deal to acquire Time Warner Cable. Domestically, consolidation is the name of the game for traditional TV subscription services. But while techies are quick to pit hated cable companies against beloved digital video pioneers, Netflix's sub gains

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Emmy Nominations Yield Celebration — And Second-Guessing (Analysis)

July 10, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

The abundance of quality programming and expanding number of options has created a logjam for the nighttime Emmy Awards, where the celebration over which shows earned nomination will inevitably give way to plenty of second-guessing about those that were overlooked. Despite the onslaught of competition from sources such as Netflix, HBO – with its multifaceted... Read more

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Nielsen Exec: Don’t Expect to Be Impressed by Impact of Mobile TV Ratings

July 9, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Nielsen Media Research has declared itself "open for business" in terms of tracking TV viewing on smartphones, tablets and other electronic gadgets. But don’t expect those numbers, which will be available for the first time with the new fall broadcast season, to be impressive, statistically speaking. "It will start small and build gradually," Cheryl Idell, Nielsen’s evp of U.S. media, said at the semi-annual Television Critics Association conference kickoff in Beverly Hills. “We won’t see dramatic changes in ratings with this data added in.” That may not be the big splash the advertising community has been hoping for. Claire Browne, vp, director of media research at ad agency RPA in Los Angeles, described Nielsen as "behind the curve" and "playing catch-up" on measuring mobile viewing, a project that’s been in the works for years. "They have to do this to remain relevant," she said. "Consumer behavior is running so far ahead of the research." Nielsen first announced the long-gestating service last fall, promising TV networks a better cross-platform gauge of total viewers so they can set their ad rates accordingly. Advertisers are also clamoring for the data so they can strike the best media buying deals and keep up with the on-the-go consumer who’s increasingly turning to mobile devices for entertainment.

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Sun Valley: Cable Consolidation, Murdoch and Digital Disruption Among Big Themes

July 7, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Media and technology moguls are jetting to Sun Valley, Idaho this week for mountainside pressing of the flesh and potentially some deal-making. The exclusive confab, sponsored by investment bank Allen & Co., gets started Tuesday behind closed doors, allowing the captains of industry to trade in their power suits for casual wear and engage in... Read more

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You Could Get Paid to Watch Netflix

July 7, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If you live in the U.K. or Ireland, you could get paid to watch Netflix for a living. The streaming service put up a job listing seeking a qualified candidate to help out with its recommendations system by watching movies and television shows, The Huffington Post reports . According to Netflix's offical job listing for a tagger, "applicants will be responsible for watching and analyzing films and TV programmes that will be streaming on Netflix in the future. The tagger will deconstruct the films and programmes and describe them using objective tags." The listing goes on to specify that the role will offer flexible hours and would be ideal for those with a background in film or film history, or those with filmmaking experience. Taggers are also among the first to see Netflix original series, such as House of Cards and Orange is the New Black . While there are currently around 40 Taggers worldwide, this is the first time Netflix is recruiting for the position in the U.K. and Ireland, reports The Independent . According to that publication, current taggers include "a mum who speaks fluent Hindi and has worked on several procedural crime shows, a French native and former keyboard player in Stereolab now living in New York who tags French-language content and a film director working on his third feature starring Tim Roth who lives in Mexico City and tags Spanish-language content." "We see ourselves as a match making service, which means that we get to know our members and how they interact with our service,"

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Programmers Are Frustrated by a Lack of Netflix Metrics

June 29, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

When Breaking Bad scored three Emmy wins last fall, its showrunner, Vince Gilligan , credited Netflix for his show’s longevity and for heightening its popularity. Similarly, program execs in general have been thrilled with how streaming video services have made up for lost DVD revenue. But a little bloom is off the rose. Frustration with Netflix has set in as programmers renegotiate contract renewals (to the tune of more than $7 billion, according to some estimates). “The biggest concerns are about getting sufficient metrics about how their product is being consumed,” said Bruce Lazarus, CEO of Media Audits International (MAI), which helps programmers validate the subscriber information they receive from distribution platforms. “When you want to sell your content to the platforms, what’s the proper pricing model?” “We get a little information about which of our products are being watched on Netflix, but we get no data about who exactly is watching our shows,” noted John Kampfe, CFO of Turner Broadcasting System. Netflix declined to speak with Adweek for this story. “Oftentimes data is limited to stream starts and/or unique users, and neither provide meaningful insight into the value of a programmer’s content,” said Richard Taub, svp of broadcast and digital services at MAI. There’s no standard definition of stream starts; it could mean someone merely hit “play” and watched for either two seconds or two hours.

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First Look: Joan Allen in Netflix’s ‘The Killing’

June 26, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Netflix has released the first image of guest star Joan Allen in the upcoming season of “The Killing.” Allen plays Colonel Margaret Rayne, the headmaster of an all boys’ military academy. In the fourth season, Detective Linden (Mireille Enos) and Detective Holder (Joel Kinnaman) are assigned a new case: a picture-perfect family is murdered, survived... Read more

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The Guild’s Felicia Day Wrote Herself the Role of a Lifetime

June 22, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Felicia Day’s dearly departed Web series The Guild started before anybody was really talking about the medium—it was a year before the world knew that lonelygirl15 was a work of fiction. But Day, the series’ sole writer for all six of its seasons, says the show was a vital outlet for her at a time when her career as an actress wasn’t offering much fulfillment. “There was never a role that I felt really represented me,” she says. “I used to get shunted to the sidelines as the third best friend or the secretary. I have an unusual background and interests that don’t really align with mainstream entertainment, so I wrote myself a central role.” That role, of a lonely gamer girl who goes by the handle Codex, became both a rallying cry for girls who, like Day, felt underrepresented in mainstream entertainment and ostracized by gamer culture (which, though it contains plenty of women and girls, tends to be dominated by men who aren’t very friendly to them). The show migrated to Xbox after a first season funded by fans donating through PayPal (Kickstarter hadn’t yet been launched). The episode recognized here, “End Game,” brought the show to its conclusion. “It was very emotional, I have to say,” recalls Day. “I’m the only writer, and I got to the point where I said, ‘What’s the cliffhanger for this series?’ and I just didn’t have one.” Day has shifted her focus to Geek & Sundry, part of a YouTube 100-channel initiative launched in 2012, where her duties are more concentrated on production and development. The Guild now lives on Netflix and elsewhere. For Day, the Web series remains a high watermark. “We filled rooms at Comic-Con that TV shows usually fill,” she says. “That will always be a huge accomplishment. Talent - Gold The Guild: End Game: Felicia Day Company: Geek & Sundry

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How Chelsea Handler Changes Our Understanding of Netflix

June 21, 2014  |  Variety  |  No Comments

Netflix’s hiring of Chelsea Handler marks the most audacious move the TV industry has seen since “House of Cards” set the benchmark for audacity last year by becoming the first viable premium original series delivered on the Internet. Just in case anyone misinterprets signing Handler as anything less than eye-popping, Netflix made sure to underline... Read more

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Netflix Will Stop Telling Customers Verizon Is Making Their Movies Load Slower

June 9, 2014  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Netflix said Monday it would comply with Verizon's cease-and-desist letter, sent to both the general public and Netflix general counsel David Hyman from Verizon general counsel Randal S. Milch. The letter's complaints against Netflix were that the streaming service was misrepresenting the "many different factors that affect traffic on the Internet," including the controversy over whether or not Verizon is obliged to provide free access to its network based on user preference. In response, Netflix said that as part of a "transparency campaign" to tell users when the network they were using was choking Netflix content, "we started a small scale test in early May that lets consumers know, while they’re watching Netflix, that their experience is degraded due to a lack of capacity into their broadband provider’s network. "We are testing this across the U.S. wherever there is significant and persistent network congestion," the company said in a blog post bylined to communications vp Joris Evers. "This test is scheduled to end on June 16. We will evaluate rolling it out more broadly." While this is sort of a non-denial-denial—we don't admit that what we're doing is wrong but coincidentally, we're going to stop doing it—on the heels of the Verizon C&D letter, it comes with yet another dig at Verizon: a post from the company's ISP speed ranker, a fascinating tool you can check out yourself here . With the new site, which appears to dynamically measure average bandwidth—that's actual bandwidth, not advertised bandwidth—you can see that Netflix's data streams a lot slower from Verizon's DSL service (which is definitely incredibly slow), but you can also see, among other things, that the U.S. has some of the slowest streaming speeds in the developed world, below every European country except Ireland and lagging behind much poorer countries elsewhere in the Americas like Mexico and Brazil.

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