Posts Tagged ‘nbc’

Cory Monteith Tribute Lifts Glee, NBC Comedies Sink

October 11, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

A heartfelt tribute to the late Cory Monteith (Finn) helped rally legions of Gleeks, giving the Fox musical drama its highest rating in over a year. “The Quarterback,” an elegy co-written by Glee creators Ryan Murphy and Brad Falchuk, delivered 7.41 million viewers and a 2.8 in the adults 18-49 demo, improving upon last week’s rating (1.6) by 75 percent. The last time Glee put up bigger numbers was on Sept. 20, 2012, when the show delivered 7.46 million viewers and a 2.9 in the demo. Thursday night’s episode is the last before Glee heads off on its annual month-long hiatus. Episode 4 is slated to air on Nov. 7. If the emotional hour left fans scrambling for the Kleenex, the tears really started falling this morning when the overnights came in at NBC. After bowing to inauspicious ratings , newcomers Welcome to the Family, Sean Saves the World and The Michael J. Fox Show suffered staggering losses. Per Nielsen fast national data, Welcome to the Family dropped 27 percent to a 0.8 in the dollar demo, while Sean fell 29 percent to a 1.0. While both shows are in danger of cancelation, the Sony-produced Family will probably be the first to go. (Sean is produced in-house by Universal Television.) At 9:30 p.m., The Michael J. Fox Show fell another 29 percent to a 1.2 rating—a full 43 percent below its Sept. 26 time slot premiere. All told, the two-hour comedy block averaged a 1.1 in the demo, off the year-ago pace by one-half of a ratings point, or 31 percent. Whether it fills the 8:30 or 9 p.m. gap, look for Dan Harmon’s Community to rejoin the Thursday night fold before the leaves turn. ABC this morning was also the recipient of bad news, as its freshman genre exercise

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Hulu Gets Its Second New Boss of the Year

October 11, 2013  |  All Things Digital  |  No Comments

Hulu is under new management, for the second time this year. Andy Forssell, who has been running the video site since last spring as an interim CEO, is out. 21st Century Fox executive Mike Hopkins is headed in. The fact that Forssell is leaving isn’t surprising. After Hulu sales boss JP Colaco left last month , Forssell was the sole high-profile executive left at the site with ties to original CEO Jason Kilar. And if Hulu’s owners — Fox, Disney and Comcast — had wanted him to run the business on a permanent basis, they could have said so anytime in the last six months. Instead, Fox and Disney executives — a deal with federal regulators means that Comcast doesn’t have a say in the site’s management — have been conducting a search for a new site head. Hopkins has run distribution for Fox, so his appointment has some logic to it, if you think of Hulu as a digital hub for its owners’ content. But Disney and Fox could have gone in different directions, by picking an executive with an ad sales background, or one with strong product skills. Both Bloomberg and Reuters reported Hopkins’s appointment late Thursday night. As always with Hulu, the real issue for the video site isn’t its management, but what its owners want to do with it. Fox and Disney executives have gone back and forth over the site’s future for years. In July, when they announced that they wouldn’t sell Hulu, but would instead invest $750 million to help the site compete with Netflix and Amazon , it seemed that they were aligned. But people familiar with both companies say they are at loggerheads again. In a memo announcing his departure, distributed to Hulu employees Thursday, Forssell said Hulu was on track to generate close to $1 billion in revenue this year. In 2012, the company reported $700 million in revenue .

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Ratings: More Slippage on Wednesday Night

October 10, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Erosion continues to plague the Wednesday night broadcast lineup, as new shows and returning veterans once again suffered significant ratings reversals. Per Nielsen fast national data, every network series took a hit last night, although some declines were much more pronounced than others. ABC’s two-hour comedy block got off to a relatively stable start, as The Middle dipped 4 percent to a 2.2 in the adults 18-49 demo, but after that things went downhill. At 8:30 p.m., the freshman comedy Back in the Game dropped two-tenths of a ratings point to a series-low 1.7 rating, while the aging powerhouse Modern Family slumped to a 3.8 in the dollar demo, down 10 percent from a week ago. When compared to last season’s analogous episode, Modern Family was down 21 percent. Leading out of Modern Family at 9:30 p.m., Super Fun Night returned to a 2.5 rating, down 22 percent from its premiere delivery (3.2). That’s a little steeper than the average 15-20 percent erosion that is expected between a debut and the second episode, but still enough to claim bragging rights as the night’s third biggest rating. Super Fun Night also improved on former time slot occupant The Neighbor’s year-ago 2.0 rating by 25 percent. The sudsy sophomore musical drama Nashville closed out the night with a 1.7 rating, down 11 percent versus last week and off 15 percent from its year-ago 2.0. NBC’s Hump Day struggles continued apace, as Revolution fell another tenth to a series-low 1.5, although that was slightly better than last season’s Animal Practice-Guys With Kids battery, which combined for a 1.3 rating. Law & Order: SVU sank 20 percent to a 1.6, and newcomer Ironside wobbled closer to oblivion with a 1.1, down 15 percent from the premiere’s already untenable 1.3 rating . Tying ABC for the lead among adults 18-49 (2.3) and winning the 25-54 demo outright, CBS endured double-digit declines at bookends Survivor (down 11 percent to a 2.4) and CSI (off 10 percent from a 1.9, tying a series low). The meat in the sandwich, Criminal Minds , held up well, dipping only 4 percent to a 2.8. The procedural put up a 3.4 in its target demo, off two-tenths of a point from a week ago. Fox’s The X Factor shed a tenth of a ratings point (2.2), but was down 37 percent versus its year-ago 3.5.

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We Are Dead Men: CBS Kills Off Freshman Comedy

October 10, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

If Jerry O’Connell can’t seem to catch a break on broadcast TV, CBS’ Monday 8:30 p.m. time slot isn’t in much better shape. The network on Wednesday evening elected to shutter O’Connell’s new sitcom We Are Men, marking the actor’s third premature demise since 2008. The $10 million pilot for NBC’s Mockingbird Lane , a dramatic Munsters reboot starring O’Connell as the Frankensteinian patriarch Herman, was burned off last October to little fanfare, while the Fox comedy Do Not Disturb was rubbed out six years ago after just two episodes. Scattered among the likeable actor’s r

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ABC Cancels Lucky 7

October 4, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Lucky 7 has been 86’d. After just two episodes, the low-rated freshman drama has been yanked from ABC’s Tuesday night lineup. Effective Oct. 8, the network will fill the 10 p.m. timeslot with encore presentations of its hit drama Scandal. Ironic title aside, Lucky 7 never really had a chance. The show premiered on Sept. 24 to 4.43 million viewers and a rock-bottom 1.3 in the 18-49 demo , making it the lowest-rated fall drama premiere in ABC history. The subsequent broadcast fared even worse, delivering an unsustainable 2.62 million viewers and a 0.7 rating. Based on the UK series The Syndicate, Lucky 7 documented the lives of a group of Queens, NY, gas station employees who share a winning lottery ticket. Lucky 7 was canceled a year to the day after CBS aired the second (and final) episode of its Friday night drama Made in Jersey . The first cancelation of the 2013-14 broadcast season, Lucky’s demise came just 24 hours after Fox announced it had picked up Sleepy Hollow for a second season. While there’s been no official word from ABC, its new Sunday 10 p.m

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Letterman Re-ups With CBS

October 4, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Jay Leno may be riding into the sunset in a denim tuxedo, but his longtime late night rival David Letterman is staying put, extending his contract with CBS for another year. The additional trip around the sun cements Letterman’s tenure as the longest-running late night chat show host in history—31 years behind the desk, of which the last 20 have been in service of CBS. In a statement, the Late Show host joked that the extra year will give him adequate time to sow salt into the soil. “[CBS Corp. CEO] Les [Moonves] and I had a lengthy discussion, and we both agreed that I needed a little more time to fully run the show into the ground,” Letterman said. Per terms of the new deal, Letterman will remain the host of the Late Show through 2015. His contract was set to expire next fall. While financials were not disclosed, Letterman is believed to pull in around

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NBC’s Thursday Night Comedies Fall Flat

October 4, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Bob Greenblatt’s decision to steer the HMS Funnybones into the mainstream hasn’t prevented NBC’s Thursday night comedy lineup from sinking to the bottom. And while it’s too early to call for a salvage mission, the early numbers are decidedly unpromising. According to Nielsen fast national data, the two-hour comedy block averaged a 1.5 in the dollar demo, falling 12 percent from the year-ago preliminary deliveries. When the 10 p.m. hour is factored in, NBC finished last among the Big Four in total viewers (4.55 million) and the 18-49 demo (1.6), flat versus last year’s rating. Leading off the night, the criminally underappreciated Parks and Recreation tied last week’s premiere (1.3), while Welcome to the Family earned the dubious distinction of posting the lowest rating for a fall comedy debut in NBC history (1.2). This marks the second time the Peacock bottomed out this week—Ironside on Wednesday bowed to an historic low 1.3 rating . NBC’s second Thursday night comedy premiere performed somewhat better, as Sean Saves the World delivered a 1.6 rating.

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Ironside Rolls to a Dead Stop; Super Fun Night Lifts ABC

October 3, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

ABC’s decision to mothball the Super Fun Night pilot seems to have paid off, as the replacement episode performed well on Wednesday night. The series premiere of the Rebel Wilson vehicle delivered 8.21 million viewers and a 3.2 rating among adults 18-49, making it the night’s No. 2 show. Per Nielsen fast national data, lead-in Modern Family won the night with a 4.2 in the dollar demo—flat versus last week’s season premiere. Super Fun Night’s ratings are likely to be downgraded somewhat, as the 9:30 p.m. data stream includes a minute of Modern Family overrun. For the time being, the show now stands as the season’s second highest-rated new comedy premiere, trailing CBS’ The Crazy Ones (3.9) and edging ABC’s The Goldbergs (3.1). ABC pulled the critically derided pilot shortly after the summer TCA press tour. In its place, the network slotted Episode 102, which featured a plot that allowed Wilson to show off her Pitch Perfect pipes.

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Legends of the Fall TV Season

September 30, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Projecting a TV series’ long-term prospects on the basis of a single broadcast is a puzzling seasonal compulsion, a ritual on par with the creation of back-to-school macaroni art. Just as you can’t accurately predict that your kid is going to grow up to be the next Robert Rauschenberg on the basis of his facility with elbow macaroni and Elmer’s Glue, nor can any meaningful conclusions be drawn from Premiere Week ratings. Still, who are we to tamper or dally with tradition? (Besides, what sort of monster begrudges macaroni art?) Here’s what the first week of Nielsen data tells us about the 2013-14 TV season: 1) Broadcast isn’t dead. It’s not even sick. Through Sept. 26, the Big Four were up 5 percent in the 18-49 demo versus the year-ago period. Some of that had to do with healthy sampling of new series— Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (ABC) bowed to a brawny 12.1 million viewers and a 4.7 rating, NBC’s The Blacklist drew 12.6 million viewers and a 3.8 in the demo, and CBS’ The Crazy Ones scared up an insane 15.6 million viewers/4.0 rating—but the returning series were no slouches, either. The CBS warhorse NCIS returned to a whopping 20 million viewers, The Big Bang Theory put up a monster 5.6 rating, and NBC’s The Voice surpassed expectations with 15.0 million viewers and a 5.1 in the dollar demo. 2) Crime pays. Genre slays. Along with the aforementioned NCIS, CBS’ Criminal Minds and NBC’s deathless Law & Order: SVU continued to pack ’em in

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Robin Williams, CBS Win the Retro Battle

September 27, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

They may not go head-to-head in Week 2, but if Thursday night’s numbers are anything to go by, Robin Williams is beating Michael J. Fox in the Comeback Kid ratings battle. According to Nielsen fast national data, the series premiere of Williams’ new CBS comedy The Crazy Ones drew a staggering 15.6 million viewers and a 4.0 in the adults 18-49 demo, making it the biggest sitcom debut since the Tiffany Network introduced 2 Broke Girls in 2011. The beneficiary of a comprehensive marketing campaign and a huge Big Bang Theory lead-in, The Crazy Ones made short work of the first of two episodes of NBC’s The Michael J. Fox Show . The 9 p.m. installment of MJFS drew half the audience of The Crazy Ones, averaging 7.22 million viewers and a 2.1 in the demo. While the preliminary data may seem a bit of a disappointment for Fox fans, there are a few positive elements in play. For one, MJFS more than doubled lead-in Park and Recreation’s deliveries (3.33 million viewers), while improving on the demo by 54 percent. The show also gained steam in its second half hour, adding roughly 130,000 new viewers while maintaining its demo rating. From a marketplace perspective, NBC appears to have anticipated that Michael J. Fox’s new outing would appeal to older viewers.

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