Posts Tagged ‘nbc’

CBS Soars With Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer

November 27, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

There are three certainties to be gleaned from the classic Rankin/Bass holiday special Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer: 1) Bumbles bounce ,

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Seasonal Stumbles for Monday Night’s Hottest Series

November 5, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

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NFL Flex Schedule a Godsend for NBC

November 4, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

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Red Sox Drive Solid World Series Ratings

October 31, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

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Lady Gaga to Host ‘Saturday Night Live’

October 31, 2013  |  Variety  |  No Comments

The rumors are true: Lady Gaga is set to host “Saturday Night Live,” and perform as the musical guest on the latenight program’s Nov. 16 broadcast. Episode will mark Gaga’s third appearance as a musical guest on the NBC show, and first time hosting. Her gig as “SNL’s” host will arrive just days after the... Read more

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NBC Rules the Broadcast Roost, But CBS Has the Most Hit Shows

October 30, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With five weeks of ratings data on the books, NBC remains entrenched as the No. 1 broadcast network, while CBS can lay claim to the lion’s share of the top 20 shows. According to Nielsen live-plus-same-day data for the period spanning Sept. 24-Oct. 27, NBC is lapping the field with an average prime-time rating of 2.8 in the 18-49 demo, up one-tenth of a point versus the year-ago period. Boosted by the World Series, runner-up Fox is flat with a 2.3 rating, while CBS is down two-tenths of a point with a 2.1. Last-place ABC is down a tenth to a 2.0 rating. As was the case a year ago, NBC’s dominance is being fueled by Sunday Night Football, The Voice and the drama that leads out of the latter on Monday nights. The prime-time NFL showcase is the most-watched, highest-rated program on TV, averaging 21.7 million total viewers and an 8.4 in the dollar demo. Season-to-date, Sunday Night Football is up 3 percent in overall deliveries and flat in the demo. (If not for a brutal Oct. 27 Packers-Vikings game that delivered just 16.9 million viewers in head-to-head competition with Game 5 of the World Series, the SNF ratings likely would be up slightly.) CBS’ The Big Bang Theory is the No.

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TV Network Time Slots Where Nothing Seems to Go Right

October 21, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

They’re scattered across the prime-time schedule like missing teeth in a jack-o’-lantern’s crooked grin—dead spots where nothing seems to prosper. Every network has at least one haunted time slot, one tumbledown chunk of real estate that defies development, and the longer they remain unsettled, the harder it is to draw viewers back. ABC is saddled with two of the most pernicious time slots on the broadcast schedule (Sunday nights at 10 p.m. and 8 p.m. Thursdays), while unrelenting pressure from CBS and a string of high-profile failures have made a ghost town of NBC’s once mighty Thursday lineup. While both networks have enjoyed big wins on other nights—ABC’s Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. (3.4) and NBC’s The Blacklist (3.3) are the season’s two highest-rated freshman series—the trouble spots are only getting worse. Because Thursday is the most important night for advertisers (movie studios will pay any price to get fannies in the seats on opening weekends), the underdeliveries have had a destabilizing impact on NBC’s ad sales revenue. Leading off with the unvanquishable The Big Bang Theory, CBS’ two-hour comedy block commands more than twice the average unit cost booked by NBC in the same period ($207,006 versus $85,318). The same applies at 10 p.m., although in that instance, it’s ABC’s Beltway potboiler Scandal that outearns and outdelivers Parenthood by a 2.5-to-1 ratio. Season to date, NBC’s Thursday night roster is averaging a meager 1.3 in the dollar demo, down 13 percent versus the year-ago period. This is particularly disconcerting, given entertainment chairman Bob Greenblatt’s big bet on the broad, family-oriented comedies Welcome to the Family, Sean Saves the World and The Michael J. Fox Show , the latter of which was locked in for a full 22-episode run before the pilot was even shot. While Parenthood has pulled its weight in the night’s final hour, the 10 p.m. slot has been a boneyard since ER closed up shop in 2009. Among the failed dramas that have inhabited the hour are Prime Suspect, which averaged a 1.2 rating; The Firm (0.9); and Do No Harm (0.8). By comparison, Parenthood’s 1.4 rating is electrifying. ABC’s own Thursday night woes include a dog’s breakfast of expensive flops: Charlie’s Angels, Missing, Last Resort, Zero Hour and the new fairy tale drama, Once Upon a Time in Wonderland . A spinoff of the surprise Sunday night hit, Wonderland on Oct. 17 drew a 1.2 in the demo.

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CBS Gives Full-Season Orders to 3 Freshman Comedies

October 18, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

CBS today announced that it has given back-nine orders for its three remaining comedy series: The Millers , The Crazy Ones and Mom.

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CBS Delivers With Thursday Comedy Block

October 18, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

With four weeks of data on the books, CBS’ new two-hour Thursday night comedy block appears to be one of the season’s few unambiguous success stories. Anchored by The Big Bang Theory , the chuckle stack averaged a hearty 3.2 rating in the 18-49 demo, practically trebling NBC’s parallel block (1.1).

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The Big Bang Theory Gets the Highest Ad Rates Outside of the NFL

October 14, 2013  |  Media Week  |  No Comments

Just as in the cosmological model that explains how the universe sprang into existence from an infinitely dense singularity, CBS’ The Big Bang Theory has grown with such explosive force that it appears to be its own ever-expanding universe. According to media buyers surveyed by Adweek, The Big Bang Theory in its seventh season now commands a staggering $326,260 per 30-second spot, topping the likes of NBC’s The Voice ($264,575 for the higher-rated Wednesday night show), ABC’s Modern Family ($257,435) and Fox’s The Simpsons ($256,963). The robust unit cost is a function of Big Bang’s monster ratings—three episodes into the fall season, Chuck Lorre’s sitcom is averaging 19.2 million viewers and a 5.6 rating in the adults 18-49 demo—and its seemingly unstoppable growth. After posting full-season highs two years running, Big Bang’s ratings are currently trending up 12 percent versus the 2012-13 campaign. Check out the comprehensive price list for the 2013-14 broadcast season here. While the NFL commands the highest unit cost of any TV property—Fox’s roster of eight late national NFC games fetches a jaw-dropping $595,000 per :30, while each unit in NBC’s Sunday Night Football franchise is worth around $570,000 a throw—the general entertainment programs enjoy a longer run: 35 weeks when lower-priced repeats are factored in. Among the Big Four broadcast nets, CBS earns the biggest average premiums for its freshman series. The Crazy Ones , the new Tuesday 9 p.m. anchor starring Robin Williams as an idiosyncratic ad agency boss, boasts an average unit cost of $175,200—the highest rate for any new comedy. The defending ratings champ also earns top dollar for Big Bang lead-out The Millers ($122,390), Lorre’s latest multicamera sitcom Mom ($138,575) and the ratings-challenged serialized thriller Hostages ($134,420). ABC’s established reach vehicles (Modern Family, Grey’s Anatomy and, more recently, Scandal) and its popularity with younger, affluent women have allowed it to remain competitive despite ongoing ratings hiccups. But it’s a new male-skewing series that’s really leading the charge this fall, as Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. is pricing at an average rate of $169,730 per :30.

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